Acupressure Points For Neck Pain

0 Comments

Acupressure Points For Neck Pain
Zhong Zu (TE3) – The Zhong Zu point is located between the knuckles above your pinky and ring fingers. This pressure point may stimulate different parts of your brain when it’s activated, promoting circulation and tension release. Stimulate this point to relieve neck pain that’s caused by tension or stress.

What pressure point gets rid of neck pain?

How to find it: The acupressure point is in the groove on the back of the hand between the 4th and 5th fingers. The groove is below the knuckles. Directions: Massage and stimulate the area using deep, firm pressure. Repeat on the other hand.

What is the easiest way to relieve neck pain?

Pain Relief – You can use one or more of these methods to help reduce neck pain:

Use over-the-counter pain relievers such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), or acetaminophen (Tylenol).Apply heat or ice to the painful area. Use ice for the first 48 to 72 hours, then use heat. Apply heat using warm showers, hot compresses, or a heating pad.To prevent injuring your skin, do not fall asleep with a heating pad or ice bag in place.Have a partner gently massage the sore or painful areas.Try sleeping on a firm mattress with a pillow that supports your neck. You may want to get a special neck pillow. You can find them at some pharmacies or retail stores.

Ask your health care provider about using a soft neck collar to relieve discomfort.

Only use the collar for 2 to 4 days at most.Using a collar for longer can make your neck muscles weaker. Take it off from time to time to allow the muscles to get stronger.

Acupuncture also may help relieve neck pain.

What is a trigger point in the neck?

A trigger point is a tender spot within your muscle, and they can form in muscles all over your body People often describe them as ‘knots’—a bundle of tense, contracted muscle that twitches and spreads pain when pressed or moved.

What is the best relaxing position for neck pain?

What is the best sleeping position for neck pain? – Two sleeping positions are easiest on the neck: on your side or on your back. If you sleep on your back, choose a rounded to support the natural curve of your neck, with a flatter pillow cushioning your head.

Try using a feather pillow, which easily conforms to the shape of the neck. Feather pillows will collapse over time, however, and should be replaced every year or so. Another option is a traditionally shaped pillow with “memory foam” that conforms to the contour of your head and neck. Some cervical pillows are also made with memory foam. Manufacturers of memory-foam pillows claim they help foster proper spinal alignment. Avoid using too high or stiff a pillow, which keeps the neck flexed overnight and can result in morning pain and stiffness. If you sleep on your side, keep your spine straight by using a pillow that is higher under your neck than your head. When you are riding in a plane, train, or car, or even just reclining to watch TV, a horseshoe-shaped pillow can support your neck and prevent your head from dropping to one side if you doze. If the pillow is too large behind the neck, however, it will force your head forward.

Sleeping on your stomach is tough on your spine, because the back is arched and your neck is turned to the side. Preferred sleeping positions are often set early in life and can be tough to change, not to mention that we don’t often wake up in the same position in which we fell asleep. Still, it’s worth trying to start the night sleeping on your back or side in a well-supported, healthy position.

Why is my neck hurting so bad?

Neck pain is pain that starts in the neck and can be associated with radiating pain down one or both of the arms. Neck pain can come from a number of disorders or diseases that involve any of the tissues in the neck, nerves, bones, joints, ligaments or muscles.

The neck region of the spinal column, the cervical spine, consists of seven bones (C1-C7 vertebrae ), which are separated from one another by intervertebral discs. These discs allow the spine to move freely and act as shock absorbers during activity. Each vertebral bone has an opening forming a continuous hollow longitudinal space, which runs the whole length of the back.

This space, called the spinal canal, is the area through which the spinal cord and nerve bundles pass. The spinal cord is bathed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and surrounded by a protective layer called the dura, a leathery sac. At each vertebral level, a pair of spinal nerves exit through small openings called foramina (one to the left and one to the right).

  • These nerves supply the muscles, skin and tissues of the body and thus provide sensation and movement to all parts of the body.
  • The delicate spinal cord and nerves are protected by suspension in the spinal fluid in the dural sac, then further by the bony vertebrae.
  • The bony vertebrae are further supported by strong ligaments and muscles that bind them and allow for safe movement.

Neck pain may be caused by arthritis, disc degeneration, narrowing of the spinal canal, muscle inflammation, strain or trauma. In rare cases, it may be a sign of cancer or meningitis. For serious neck problems, a primary care physician and often a specialist, such as a neurosurgeon, should be consulted to make an accurate diagnosis and prescribe treatment.

Age, injury, poor posture or diseases such as arthritis can lead to degeneration of the bones or joints of the cervical spine, causing disc herniation or bone spurs to form. Sudden severe injury to the neck may also contribute to disc herniation, whiplash, blood vessel destruction, vertebral injury and in extreme cases may result in permanent paralysis.

Herniated discs or bone spurs may cause a narrowing of the spinal canal, or the small openings through which spinal nerve roots exit, putting pressure on spinal cord or the nerves. Pressure on the spinal cord in the cervical region can be a serious problem, because virtually all of the nerves to the rest of the body have to pass through the neck to reach their final destination (arms, chest, abdomen, legs).

  1. This can potentially compromise the function of many important organs.
  2. Pressure on a nerve can result in numbness, pain or weakness to the area in the arm the nerve supplies.
  3. Cervical stenosis occurs when the spinal canal narrows and compresses the spinal cord and is most frequently caused by degeneration associated with aging.

(See also: AANS Cervical Spine Patient Page ). The discs in the spine that separate and cushion vertebrae may dry out. As a result, the space between the vertebrae shrinks and the discs lose their ability to act as shock absorbers. At the same time, the bones and ligaments that make up the spine become less pliable and thicken.

  • These changes result in a narrowing of the spinal canal.
  • In addition, the degenerative changes associated with cervical stenosis can affect the vertebrae by contributing to the growth of bone spurs that compress the nerve roots.
  • Mild stenosis can be treated conservatively for extended periods of time as long as the symptoms are restricted to neck pain.

Severe stenosis may impinge the spinal cord causing injury and requires referral to a neurosurgeon. Neck injury symptoms include neck stiffness, shoulder or arm pain, headache, facial pain and dizziness. Pain from a motor vehicle injury may be caused by tears in muscles or injuries to the joints between vertebrae.

You might be interested:  Pain In Sitting Bone

Pain in the arm Numbness or weakness in the arm or forearm Tingling in the fingers or hand Difficulty with balance and walking Weakness in the arms or legs

Those with neck pain may be referred to a neurosurgeon because of pain in the neck, shoulder or tingling and numbness in the arms or weakness. Neurosurgeons should be consulted for neck pain if:

It occurs after an injury or blow to the head Fever or headache accompanies the neck pain Stiff neck prevents the patient from touching chin to chest Pain shoots down one arm There is tingling, numbness or weakness in the arms or hands Neck symptoms associated with leg weakness or loss of coordination in arms or legs The pain does not respond to over-the-counter pain medication Pain does not improve after a week

Diagnosis is made by a neurosurgeon based on patient history, symptoms, a physical examination and results of diagnostic studies, if necessary. Some patients may be treated conservatively and then undergo imaging studies if medication and physical therapy are ineffective. These tests may include:

Computed Tomography Scan (CT or CAT scan) Discography Electromyography (EMG) Nerve Conduction Studies (NCS) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Myelogram Selective Nerve Root Block X-rays

Most causes of neck pain are not life threatening and resolve with time and conservative medical treatment. Determining a treatment strategy depends mainly on identifying the location and cause of the pain. Although neck pain can be quite debilitating and painful, nonsurgical management can alleviate many symptoms.

  • The doctor may prescribe medications to reduce the pain or inflammation and muscle relaxants to allow time for healing to occur.
  • Reducing physical activities or wearing a cervical collar may help provide support for the spine, reduce mobility and decrease pain and irritation.
  • Trigger point injection, including corticosteroids, can temporarily relieve pain.

Occasionally, epidural steroids may be recommended. Conservative treatment options may continue for six to eight weeks. If the patient is experiencing any weakness or numbness in the arms or legs, seek medical attention immediately. If the patient has had any trauma and is now experiencing neck pain with weakness or numbness, urgent consultation with a neurosurgeon is recommended.

Conservative therapy is not helping The patient experiences a decrease in function due to persistent pain The patient experiences progressive neurological symptoms involving the arms and legs The patient experiences difficulty with balance or walking The patient is in otherwise good health

There are several different surgical procedures which can be utilized, the choice is influenced by the specifics of each case. Also, there are options for approaches from the front of the neck or the back of the neck. In many cases, spinal fusion is performed, though in some cases, simple decompression or artificial disc replacement may be employed.

  1. Spinal fusion is an operation that creates a solid union between two or more vertebrae.
  2. Various devices (like screws or plates) may be used to enhance fusion and support unstable areas of the cervical spine.
  3. This procedure may assist in strengthening and stabilizing the spine and may thereby help to alleviate severe and chronic neck pain.

Factors that help determine the type of surgical treatment include the specifics of the disc disease and the presence or absence of pressure on the spinal cord or spinal nerve roots. Other factors include age, how long the patient has had the disorder, other medical conditions and if there has been previous cervical spine surgery.

  • If the patient smokes, he or she should try to quit.
  • Smoking damages the structures and architecture of the spine and slows down the healing process.
  • If overweight, the patient should try to lose weight.
  • Both smoking and obesity have been shown to have a negative impact on spinal fusion surgery outcome.

The benefits of surgery should always be weighed carefully against its risks. Although a large percentage of neck pain patients report significant pain relief after surgery, there is no guarantee that surgery will help every individual. If neck pain resolves with non-surgical, conservative treatment, follow-up will likely be on an as-needed basis or if symptoms return.

  • If a patient undergoes surgery, follow-up is specific to each type of procedure.
  • AANS Patient Pages are authored by neurosurgical professionals, with the goal of providing useful information to the public. Alex P.
  • Michael, MD Important The AANS does not endorse any treatments, procedures, products or physicians referenced in these patient fact sheets.

This information provided is an educational service and is not intended to serve as medical advice. Anyone seeking specific neurosurgical advice or assistance should consult his or her neurosurgeon, or locate one in your area through the AANS’ Find a Board-certified Neurosurgeon online tool.

Why won’t the knot in my neck go away?

A muscle knot, also called a trigger point, is an area of tense muscle. It develops when muscle fibers tighten and contract, even when the muscle isn’t moving. Your neck is especially prone to muscle knots. That’s because many daily activities, like texting on a phone or working on a computer, can take a toll on the muscles in your neck.

Knots in your neck can also form due to physical inactivity and emotional stress. Because muscle knots often hurt, it may feel uncomfortable to move your neck. Fortunately, simple self-care measures, like massages and stretching, may help you find relief. Here’s a look at seven easy ways to help relieve a painful knot in your neck.

And, if you want to know what causes these pesky knots and when you should see a doctor about them, we’ve got that covered, too. While muscle knots can form anywhere in your body, your neck is one of the most common spots. A knot can affect most parts of your neck, including the:

  • base of your skull
  • back of your neck
  • side of your neck

If you have a knot in your neck, it means some of the muscle fibers in your neck are continually contracting. This can cause neck pain that feels dull, achy, or sharp. The pain might occur at the knot or in a nearby area, like your shoulder or arm. Other symptoms of a knot in your neck often include:

  • a hard, sensitive bump
  • tenderness
  • tightness
  • headaches

The good news is that with the right self-care treatments, you may be able to relieve a knot in your neck, along with the pain and tension that comes with it. Here are seven simple ways to get the upper hand with a painful neck knot. To loosen a muscle knot, do a trigger point self-massage. This involves pressing the knot to relax tight muscle fibers. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Place your fingers on the knot.
  2. Apply firm pressure for 5 to 10 seconds. Release.
  3. Repeat for 3 to 5 minutes, up to 6 times a day. Repeat daily.

Applying heat or ice may ease the muscle pain a knot causes. Ice can help reduce inflammation in and around the knot. Heat may help soothe and relax the muscles. Use whichever treatment brings the most relief, or try alternating between the two. When using this remedy, make sure you wrap the heat or ice pack in a towel or cloth to protect your skin.

  • heating pad
  • hot water bottle
  • warm or cold compress
  • ice pack

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (known as NSAIDs for short), are pain-relieving medicines that are available over the counter (OTC). They work by reducing inflammation, which controls pain and swelling. Examples of NSAIDs include:

  • aspirin
  • ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
  • naproxen (Aleve)

Though NSAIDs can manage muscle knot pain, the relief is temporary. They work best in combination with trigger point massage and stretching. The shoulder shrug is an exercise that targets your neck, shoulders, and spine. It involves gentle shoulder movements, which relax the surrounding muscles. To do this exercise:

  1. Sit or stand up straight.
  2. Inhale. Move your shoulders up and toward your ears. Pause.
  3. Exhale. Drop your shoulders back to the starting position.
  4. Repeat 2 to 3 sets of 10 repetitions.

This stretch relieves neck tension by lengthening the muscles in your neck. It also loosens your chest and biceps, making it a great upper body stretch. To do this stretch:

  1. Sit in a chair or in a cross-legged position on the floor. Straighten your back.
  2. Move your left ear to your left shoulder. Simultaneously raise your right arm up alongside your body to shoulder height. Point your thumb upward and spread your fingers.
  3. Put your left hand on your head, with your fingers spread downward toward your right ear. Apply light pressure as you gently move your left ear closer to your left shoulder.
  4. Pause for a few moments, then switch sides and repeat.
You might be interested:  Left Side Chest Pain Gas

Cat-Cow is a classic yoga pose that stretches the neck and back muscles. It involves flexing and extending your spine, which helps posture and mobility. To do this stretch:

  1. Begin on all fours. Place your hands under your shoulders and your knees under your hips.
  2. Inhale. Drop your stomach down, lifting your chin to the ceiling.
  3. Exhale. Round your back, moving your chin toward your chest.
  4. Repeat for 1 minute.

Like Cat-Cow, Cobra Pose helps with improving posture. It works by opening the chest muscles, which counteracts slouched shoulders. The lengthening motion of this move also helps relieve back and neck pain. To do this stretch:

  1. Lie down on your stomach. Place your hands under your shoulders, fingers facing forward.
  2. Gently squeeze your glutes. Push up from the ground, slowly raising your chest upward. Make sure to keep your pelvis pressed into the floor throughout the movement.
  3. Hold for 10 seconds. Relax and return to the starting position.

There are many possible causes of knots in your neck muscles. Some of the most common causes include:

  • Poor posture. If your neck and back are constantly rounded, it may cause the surrounding muscles to tense up.
  • Stress. When you’re mentally or emotionally stressed, your muscles are more likely to tense up and tighten. When you’re stressed, your breathing also tends to be more shallow. This can reduce the amount of oxygen that gets to your muscles.
  • Physical inactivity. Lack of exercise may contribute to poor posture, It also increases your risk for muscle injury.
  • Overuse, Repetitive movements during sports, work, or physically demanding activities may cause muscle knots. Repetitive heavy lifting may also increase the risk of a knot.
  • Injury. Injuries like muscle strains or tears may contribute to knots.
  • Prolonged sitting or lying. You can develop a knot after sitting or lying down for an extended period of time. It’s also common to develop a knot after sleeping in an awkward position.

If the knot in your neck doesn’t go away or gets worse, make an appointment to see your doctor. If you don’t already have a primary care provider, you can browse doctors in your area through the Healthline FindCare tool, Also seek medical attention if you have a knot in your neck and:

  • numbness or tingling in your limbs
  • poor motor control
  • pain that makes it hard to sleep
  • persistent headaches
  • blurry vision
  • dizziness
  • difficulty swallowing
  • trouble breathing
  • high fever with neck stiffness

Depending on your symptoms, your doctor will likely prescribe physical therapy. A physical therapist can provide various treatments, including:

  • therapeutic massage
  • stretching exercises
  • electrostimulation, also known as e-stim
  • trigger point mobilization
  • dry needling
  • ultrasound therapy
  • posture education

Your doctor might also have you visit a massage therapist, chiropractor, or pain specialist. If you have a knot in your neck, try massaging the area with your fingers and applying heat or ice. Do therapeutic neck exercises, like shoulder shrugs, or stretches, like head-to-hand release and Cat-Cow.

What does it feel like when a trigger point is released?

How Does Myofascial Release Work? – Myofascial Release Therapy works by reducing pain and easing tightness and tension. At the start of a session, your practitioner will examine your body to look for areas of restricted, stiffened tissue and movement. These are the unrecognized source of breakdowns and pains in your body.

  1. Many people mistakenly believe that “myofascial release” is just relaxing trigger points with a massage.
  2. But we work on a much deeper scope of what is happening in the body than trigger points.
  3. Truthfully, trigger points are superficial causes of pain and mislead people into thinking their problem has been resolved when that trigger point is released.

Only they’re disappointed when the trigger point and pain keep coming back. In contrast to loosening muscles and treating trigger points, releasing fascia can take time because it only responds to slow and gentle manipulations. Chronic and stubborn tightness often needs a bit more persuasion and patience.

Sore Muscles: Aches and pains are common for around 24 hours after your treatment as the body flushes out the toxins that release. Some people feel a similar sensation in their muscles as the one felt after a heavy workout at the gym. Just take it easy and remember that it’s only temporary – it’s likely to pass in 24 hours or less. We recommend you drink lots of water to keep your body hydrated. This extra water also helps prevent post-session headaches. Unusual Sensations: As MFR therapy sessions relax and unwind chronically tight muscles and connective tissue. You might feel some unique sensations in your body following a session. These can include muscle twitches and tremors, pulsating, or heat as blood flows back into chronically starved regions. Again, this is normal, and all symptoms should pass within 24-48 hours. If any of these unusual sensations continue longer than one or two days, consult with your practitioner.

What about the emotional impact of Myofascial release?

Emotions: In the same way as your dreams are your body letting go of stored-up emotions, you may also feel extra emotional in the days following your treatment as these emotions release from your body. This process is all quite normal. We encourage you to allow them to flow through you freely and remember that this is a sign that your body is healing. This healing time after a session is a great time to indulge in self-care rituals. For example, try an Epsom Salt bath with relaxing essential oils to soothe your soul as well as your muscles.

Vivid Dreams: Some people report having unusually vivid dreams following a session. When your body is in repair mode, you may have a more extended period of REM or “dream sleep.” It may also be your body releasing stored up emotions and processing old memories.

As we mentioned regarding emotions and unusual dreams, because we harbor feelings in our fascia, releasing the fascia can bring up painful emotions from old trauma(s). This release of emotions temporarily occurs as the body releases and starts to go through the healing process.

  • It’s important to remember that this is a temporary thing and nothing to worry about.
  • This increase in emotion is not a sign that the treatment has worsened your symptoms, and the treatment hasn’t made things worse.
  • However, this increase in emotions is a vital sign that you are moving through old traumas and healing them.

This process occurs when the body repairs dysfunctional tissues from old injuries, accidents, and illnesses. Aside from the emotional impact after myofascial release, you may also have what we refer to as a “healing crisis” after myofascial release. For example, you may feel like you have cold or flu-like symptoms or what feels like an intensification of your original symptoms.

Fatigue Headaches Feeling spaced out Bruising Fever Nausea Joint pain Insomnia Drowsiness Intense emotions Depression/ anxiety Irritability Muscle cramps Sinus Congestion

What areas of the neck should not be massaged?

Another area of endangerment is the posterior triangle of the neck, also known as the back of the neck or the nape of the neck. This area is where the cervical vertebrae are. Massage therapists should also avoid putting pressure on the suprasternal notch, or the top part of the sternum.

Which part of the neck should not be massaged?

Avoiding Vulnerable Massage Areas,”articleState”:,”data”:,”slug”:”body-mind-spirit”,”categoryId”:34038},,”slug”:”physical-health-well-being”,”categoryId”:34095},,”slug”:”massage”,”categoryId”:34185}],”title”:”Avoiding Vulnerable Massage Areas”,”strippedTitle”:”avoiding vulnerable massage areas”,”slug”:”avoiding-vulnerable-massage-areas”,”canonicalUrl”:””,”seo”:,”content”:” Some vulnerable areas of the body are exposed during a massage.

\n Front of the neck/throat: You’ve heard of the expression, “Go for the jugular,” right? Well, this spot is where you find it. Steer clear of this area that also contains the carotid artery and major nerves. \n \n Side of the neck: It’s not quite as sensitive as the front of the neck, but you should still treat it gingerly. \n \n The ear notch: The little notch just behind your jawbone and beneath your ear contains a sensitive facial nerve, so don’t go shoving a finger into it. \n \n The eyeball: This one seems like common sense, but don’t poke your fingers directly into your massage partner’s eyes. \n \n The axilla: The axilla is the armpit, which is ticklish for many people. This sensitive area is full of nerves, arteries, and lymph glands. \n \n The upper inner arm: Just down from the armpit, along the inside of the upper arm, is a sensitive, nerve-filled area along the length of the arm bone. Pressing too firmly here creates that yucky-nervy feeling. \n \n The ulnar notch of the elbow: Otherwise known as the funny bone, this spot contains the ulnar nerve; if you touch it too hard, your partner may curse at you in several languages. \n \n The abdomen: This area is filled with many squishy important bits known as organs. Be especially gentle around the upper abdomen along the ribs, the area home to the liver, gallbladder, and spleen. \n \n The lower back: Don’t press too hard on the kidneys, found just to both sides of the spine and below the ribs. \n \n The femoral triangle: This area is often referred to as the groin. It’s the inner part of the line in front where your leg meets your body. Pressing too hard here can actually cut off circulation to the leg. \n \n Popliteal area: Popularly known as the back of the knee, this spot is sensitive to pressure. \n \n

You might be interested:  Cure For Itchy Scalp

“,”description”:” Some vulnerable areas of the body are exposed during a massage. Highly trained massage therapists can actually work in these areas, but if you’re not a massage professional yourself, you should stay away from these areas. \n Avoid the following spots of vulnerability: \n

\n Front of the neck/throat: You’ve heard of the expression, “Go for the jugular,” right? Well, this spot is where you find it. Steer clear of this area that also contains the carotid artery and major nerves. \n \n Side of the neck: It’s not quite as sensitive as the front of the neck, but you should still treat it gingerly. \n \n The ear notch: The little notch just behind your jawbone and beneath your ear contains a sensitive facial nerve, so don’t go shoving a finger into it. \n \n The eyeball: This one seems like common sense, but don’t poke your fingers directly into your massage partner’s eyes. \n \n The axilla: The axilla is the armpit, which is ticklish for many people. This sensitive area is full of nerves, arteries, and lymph glands. \n \n The upper inner arm: Just down from the armpit, along the inside of the upper arm, is a sensitive, nerve-filled area along the length of the arm bone. Pressing too firmly here creates that yucky-nervy feeling. \n \n The ulnar notch of the elbow: Otherwise known as the funny bone, this spot contains the ulnar nerve; if you touch it too hard, your partner may curse at you in several languages. \n \n The abdomen: This area is filled with many squishy important bits known as organs. Be especially gentle around the upper abdomen along the ribs, the area home to the liver, gallbladder, and spleen. \n \n The lower back: Don’t press too hard on the kidneys, found just to both sides of the spine and below the ribs. \n \n The femoral triangle: This area is often referred to as the groin. It’s the inner part of the line in front where your leg meets your body. Pressing too hard here can actually cut off circulation to the leg. \n \n Popliteal area: Popularly known as the back of the knee, this spot is sensitive to pressure. \n \n

“,”blurb”:””,”authors”:,”primaryCategoryTaxonomy”: },”secondaryCategoryTaxonomy”:,”tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy”:,”trendingArticles”:null,”inThisArticle”:,”relatedArticles”: }, }, }, }],”fromCategory”:},”hasRelatedBookFromSearch”:false,”relatedBook”:,”image”:,”title”:”Massage For Dummies”,”testBankPinActivationLink”:””,”bookOutOfPrint”:false,”authorsInfo”:” Steve Capellini, LMT, is a licensed massage therapist, trainer, and consultant. He has authored several books and has appeared on TV and in magazines. Michel Van Welden, PT, NT, received his training at the Physical Therapy Institute of Paris, specializing in orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation. “,”authors”:,”_links”: },”collections”:,”articleAds”:, ]\” id=\”du-slot-632218ffd2a47\”> “,”rightAd”:” “},”articleType”: },”sponsorship”:,”brandingLine”:””,”brandingLink”:””,”brandingLogo”:,”sponsorAd”:””,”sponsorEbookTitle”:””,”sponsorEbookLink”:””,”sponsorEbookImage”: },”primaryLearningPath”:”Explore”,”lifeExpectancy”:null,”lifeExpectancySetFrom”:null,”dummiesForKids”:”no”,”sponsoredContent”:”no”,”adInfo”:””,”adPairKey”:},”status”:”publish”,”visibility”:”public”,”articleId”:192808},”articleLoadedStatus”:”success”},”listState”:,”objectTitle”:””,”status”:”initial”,”pageType”:null,”objectId”:null,”page”:1,”sortField”:”time”,”sortOrder”:1,”categoriesIds”:,”articleTypes”:,”filterData”:,”filterDataLoadedStatus”:”initial”,”pageSize”:10},”adsState”:,”adsId”:0,”data”:, );(function() )(); \r\n”,”enabled”:true}, return null};\r\nthis.set=function(a,c) ;\r\nthis.check=function() return!0};\r\nthis.go=function() };\r\nthis.start=function(),!1):window.attachEvent&&window.attachEvent(\”onload\”,function() ):t.go()};};\r\ntry catch(i) })();\r\n \r\n”,”enabled”:false}, ;\r\n h._hjSettings= ;\r\n a=o.getElementsByTagName(‘head’);\r\n r=o.createElement(‘script’);r.async=1;\r\n r.src=t+h._hjSettings.hjid+j+h._hjSettings.hjsv;\r\n a.appendChild(r);\r\n })(window,document,’https://static.hotjar.com/c/hotjar-‘,’.js?sv=’);\r\n “,”enabled”:false},,, ]}},”pageScriptsLoadedStatus”:”success”},”navigationState”:,,,,,,,,, ],”navigationCollectionsLoadedStatus”:”success”,”navigationCategories”:,,,, ],”breadcrumbs”:,”categoryTitle”:”Level 0 Category”,”mainCategoryUrl”:”/category/books/level-0-category-0″}},”articles”:,,,, ],”breadcrumbs”:,”categoryTitle”:”Level 0 Category”,”mainCategoryUrl”:”/category/articles/level-0-category-0″}}},”navigationCategoriesLoadedStatus”:”success”},”searchState”:,”routeState”:,”params”:,”fullPath”:”/article/body-mind-spirit/physical-health-well-being/massage/avoiding-vulnerable-massage-areas-192808/”,”meta”:,”prerenderWithAsyncData”:true},”from”:,”params”:,”fullPath”:”/”,”meta”: }},”dropsState”:,”sfmcState”:,”profileState”:,”userOptions”:,”status”:”success”}} Some vulnerable areas of the body are exposed during a massage.

Front of the neck/throat: You’ve heard of the expression, “Go for the jugular,” right? Well, this spot is where you find it. Steer clear of this area that also contains the carotid artery and major nerves. Side of the neck: It’s not quite as sensitive as the front of the neck, but you should still treat it gingerly. The ear notch: The little notch just behind your jawbone and beneath your ear contains a sensitive facial nerve, so don’t go shoving a finger into it. The eyeball: This one seems like common sense, but don’t poke your fingers directly into your massage partner’s eyes. The axilla: The axilla is the armpit, which is ticklish for many people. This sensitive area is full of nerves, arteries, and lymph glands. The upper inner arm: Just down from the armpit, along the inside of the upper arm, is a sensitive, nerve-filled area along the length of the arm bone. Pressing too firmly here creates that yucky-nervy feeling. The ulnar notch of the elbow: Otherwise known as the funny bone, this spot contains the ulnar nerve; if you touch it too hard, your partner may curse at you in several languages. The abdomen: This area is filled with many squishy important bits known as organs. Be especially gentle around the upper abdomen along the ribs, the area home to the liver, gallbladder, and spleen. The lower back: Don’t press too hard on the kidneys, found just to both sides of the spine and below the ribs. The femoral triangle: This area is often referred to as the groin. It’s the inner part of the line in front where your leg meets your body. Pressing too hard here can actually cut off circulation to the leg. Popliteal area: Popularly known as the back of the knee, this spot is sensitive to pressure.

: Avoiding Vulnerable Massage Areas

Should I rub my neck if it hurts?

HOW TO RELIEVE NECK PAIN: MASSAGE ENVY CAN HELP – Regular massage therapy helps keep your entire body free of pain, and that’s the goal of Massage Envy’s professional therapists. When you’re suffering from neck pain in particular, the massage will focus first on your shoulders and upper back.

Is it better to sleep without pillow for neck pain?

Designed to promote healthy alignment of the head, neck, and spine, most people consider pillows to be an essential part of their sleep routine. However, some people claim that sleeping without a pillow may prevent wrinkles, improve hair texture, and even cure neck pain.

While research is still limited, some studies suggest that sleeping without a pillow does have its merits. Before you eliminate the pillow from your sleep routine, it’s important to note that not everyone benefits from sleeping without a pillow. Certain positions are better suited to pillowless sleep than others, and it’s best to consult with a healthcare professional before making major changes to your sleep setup.

We’ll discuss who stands to gain the most advantages from sleeping without a pillow, and share advice for transitioning to a flat surface when appropriate. Customize Your Comfort Our fully personalized shredded memory foam pillow perfectly blends support and pressure relief. Shop Now While research is limited, anecdotal reports show that sleeping without a pillow can help reduce neck and back pain for some sleepers. Stomach sleepers are generally best suited for going pillowless, because the lower angle of the neck encourages better spinal alignment in this position.

Should I sleep on the side where my neck hurts?

Research shows that sleeping on your back or side may ease neck pain. A medium-firm mattress and a supportive pillow can help keep your neck in a neutral position, preventing new or worsening pain.

Should I rest or stretch neck pain?

How to prevent neck pain – To ward off neck pain, it is helpful to take inventory of your posture or daily habits that could trigger neck pain, like sitting for extended periods in positions that strain the neck during reading, TV watching, computer work, or sleeping. Attending to the cause may stop some flare-ups of neck pain at the source.