Chair For Back Pain

0 Comments

Chair For Back Pain
The Best Office Chair For Lower Back Pain List

  • Ergohuman LE9ERG Office Chair – 82/100 Rating.
  • Eurotech Vera Mesh Chair – 81/100 Rating.
  • Humanscale Diffrient Smart Chair – 80/100 Rating.
  • Steelcase Leap v2 Ergonomic Chair – 80/100 Rating.
  • Humanscale Freedom Ergonomic Chair – 79/100 Rating.

Item lainnya

What type of chair is best for back pain?

Sitting All Day? You Need To Pay Closer Attention To Your Office Chair To be blunt: Humans were not built to, Our ancestors were constantly in motion—a far cry from the singular seat many of us spend eight or more hours in each day. While standing desks and foldable treadmills can, if you’re going to sit, the best office chairs for back pain will help keep your body healthy.

  1. Even if you live an active lifestyle outside of work, meeting your fitness goals and moving your body often, sitting for prolonged periods can have significant effects on your physical and mental well-being.
  2. Research shows that too much sitting can,
  3. And if you’re sitting in the wrong chair, it can lead to acute or chronic back pain.

To better understand what to look for in a comfortable and supportive office chair, we spoke with physical therapists and evaluated a ton of options. Keep reading to learn more about how to find the right one for you and to see our pick for the best office chairs for back pain of 2023.

Sitting is such a simple activity, and yet it can cause us and even pain. Why? Well, according to Lalitha McSorley, lead physical therapist at, many of the chairs we use are not designed with our spines in mind. “When you’re not sitting up straight, your muscles have to work harder to keep you in that position, which can lead to fatigue and pain,” McSorley says.

“Sitting puts your spine in a C-shape, which is not ideal. Your head weighs as much as a bowling ball, and sitting with your neck at a 45-degree angle exerts around 55 pounds of force on shoulders and back muscles.” That’s why when patients come to McSorley complaining about lower-back pain, one of the first things she recommends is that they experiment with the settings on their office chair, to find a position that feels better.

While she doesn’t consider ergonomic chairs to be a cure-all, McSorley says they can and alleviate back pain. “Office chairs designed with ergonomics in mind distribute pressure more evenly,” she explains. “And adjustable features such as height and lumbar support can help to create a more comfortable seating position.” The internet is flooded with fancy office gear that promises to make your work setup more comfortable than you could ever imagine—so how do you separate the best from the rest? As physical therapist puts it, “The more adjustments the chair has, the better.” That way, you can find the best angle for your body and make micro-adjustments as needed.

“At minimum, their chair should have adjustable height, adjustable recline, and adjustable armrests,” Candy advises. “The amount of ‘lumbar support’ needed varies among individuals, but in general, it should fill the gap behind the lower back without pushing the lower back into more of an arch than it would be naturally.” We considered expert advice on what to look for in an office chair and prioritize those with multiple adjustment settings.

Lumbar support is critical when it comes to a chair you spend prolonged periods of time in. Each of these picks is supportive and helps keep your body aligned. Customer feedback is important, so we considered the good and bad reviews for each option, prioritizing those with the most positive feedback.

Again, you spend a lot of time in your office chair—so this is an investment in your health. That said, we included options for a variety of budgets, without sacrificing quality.

Multiple adjustment settingsUp to 135 degrees of tiltLumbar support that conforms to your body

ExpensiveDifficult assembly

Arrives in a box, but expert assembly is available Armrest Headrest Back tilt Height Being able to adjust (and readjust) your seat to best align with your posture is critical for maintaining, This chair allows for just that, offering an adjustable headrest and armrests, with customizable height and tilt tension.

Plus, the 3D lumbar support responds to the precise amount of pressure you exert, providing just the right level of cushioning for your back. This chair has nearly 4,000 five-star ratings on Amazon, plus, People say it’s “insanely easy to put together,” high-quality, sturdy, and a “total game-changer for anyone who spends a lot of time sitting at a computer.” Being able to adjust (and readjust) your seat to best align with your posture is critical for maintaining,

This chair allows for just that, offering an adjustable headrest and armrests, with customizable height and tilt tension. Plus, the 3D lumbar support responds to the precise amount of pressure you exert, providing just the right level of cushioning for your back.

Lumbar support pillow includedMultiple color optionsAffordably priced

Difficult assemblyArmrests not adjustable

Blue Grey Cyan Dark Black Green Pink Purple Red White Arrives in a box, with no expert assembly available Steel Carbon fiber style leather Height Tilt 360-degree swivel Beloved by many gamers for its sturdy yet comfortable lumbar cushion and headrest pillow, this Amazon bestselling chair was made with all-day comfort in mind.

You can even tilt it as far back as 150 degrees for a nice, quick stretch (extremely beneficial during a long workday). The wheels make it easy to move throughout your office space or home, but it’s built with a sturdy, high-quality steel that’s meant to hold up over time. It has nearly 50,000 perfect five-star ratings, with to boot.

While flimsy packaging was an issue for other models we considered, reviewers say the chair arrives in pristine condition and is easy to set up within 20 to 30 minutes. Even people who spend 10+ hours sitting say they would “10/10 highly recommend” this chair.

  1. Beloved by many gamers for its sturdy yet comfortable lumbar cushion and headrest pillow, this Amazon bestselling chair was made with all-day comfort in mind.
  2. You can even tilt it as far back as 150 degrees for a nice, quick stretch (extremely beneficial during a long workday).
  3. The wheels make it easy to move throughout your office space or home, but it’s built with a sturdy, high-quality steel that’s meant to hold up over time.

This ad is displayed using third party content and we do not control its accessibility features.

Great lumbar supportComfortable padded seat cushion

Limited adjustmentsSeat height may not work for taller people

Black Blue Grey Green Pink Red White Orange Arrives in a box, with no expert assembly available This budget-friendly option streamlines your seating needs with a thick seating cushion, solid lumbar support, and some simple adjustments. It even has a curved backrest to best fit the contours of your spine.

  • You won’t get all the bells and whistles of a more expensive chair, but you will get a comfortable and supportive seat that costs less than $50.
  • Just note, this chair is not designed for heavier people.
  • It supports up to 250 pounds, but reviews suggest that it’s best for petite adults or children.
  • There are and a ton of positive reviews, with multiple people mentioning that their back felt great after long hours in this chair.

This budget-friendly option streamlines your seating needs with a thick seating cushion, solid lumbar support, and some simple adjustments. It even has a curved backrest to best fit the contours of your spine. You won’t get all the bells and whistles of a more expensive chair, but you will get a comfortable and supportive seat that costs less than $50.

Extendable footrestLumbar support pillows

Blue Grey Green Purple Red Camo Arrives in a box, with no expert assembly available Yes, technically this is a gaming chair. But it has features that work great for an office chair, too. The chair is fully loaded with an adjustable headrest, lumbar support pillows, and even an extendable footrest—talk about comfort.

It has a 130-degree tilt recline, with fixed, padded armrests and a padded leather seat. You can choose from several colorways, along with a few different models. While you can pay an additional $60 for assembly, reviewers say this chair is extremely easy to set up on your own. and thousands of reviews speak to how well-loved the chair is by gamers and home-office workers alike.

Yes, technically this is a gaming chair. But it has features that work great for an office chair, too. The chair is fully loaded with an adjustable headrest, lumbar support pillows, and even an extendable footrest—talk about comfort. It has a 130-degree tilt recline, with fixed, padded armrests and a padded leather seat.

You might be interested:  Can A Pregnant Woman Use Clove To Treat Infection

Armless designBreathable mesh material

Limited adjustmentsMay need more lumbar support for lower-back pain

Arrives in a box, with no expert assembly available If you tend to feel confined by armrests, this chair is a great choice. The best news? You don’t have to sacrifice lumbar support to get a breathable, armless design. This chair has a contoured mesh back to align and support your spine, plus adjustable seat height and an extra thick, nontoxic foam seat cushion.

You’ll have plenty of room to stretch while staying supported and comfortable throughout each day. Even better, it costs less than $100. There is a lot of positive feedback for this chair on Amazon, which can primarily be summed up by : “Comfortable, supportive and so easy to assemble! I have lower back issues that now cause pain in my leg and this chair has really helped eliminate some of the pain.

I also LOVE that it’s armless.” If you tend to feel confined by armrests, this chair is a great choice. The best news? You don’t have to sacrifice lumbar support to get a breathable, armless design. This chair has a contoured mesh back to align and support your spine, plus adjustable seat height and an extra thick, nontoxic foam seat cushion.

Foldable designFlip-up armrests

Limited adjustmentsNot ideal for taller people

Arrives in a box, with no expert assembly available Short on space? This chair comes with all the spine-supporting features we love, plus it folds up for easy storage. It swivels, has a secure seat lock, adjustable height, and flip-up armrests. The ergonomic backrest supports the natural curve of your lower back, which helps alleviate tension and pain.

You can also tilt the chair with a simple push of its lever. Customers love how easy it is to assemble and store, with plenty of rave reviews about comfort and durability. Short on space? This chair comes with all the spine-supporting features we love, plus it folds up for easy storage. It swivels, has a secure seat lock, adjustable height, and flip-up armrests.

The ergonomic backrest supports the natural curve of your lower back, which helps alleviate tension and pain. You can also tilt the chair with a simple push of its lever. This ad is displayed using third party content and we do not control its accessibility features.

Eight points of adjustmentDesigned for 8+ hours of work

Some reviews mention wiggly arms

Arrives in a box, but white glove installation only available for teams of 10 or more Lumbar support Back tilt Height Armrests width Armrest positioning Seat depth Tilt tension Headrest (which is an add-on) Our editor has (and loves) the and has been eyeing this ergonomic chair for some time.

Its simplistic design comes in three colorways for the seat and two for the frame. You can customize a whopping eight points of adjustment (including unheard-of features like armrest width, lumbar support, and seat depth) to best fit your body. This innovative piece is great for keeping your spine aligned, reducing pressure points, and maintaining good posture.

The chair has a 4.6 overall rating on the brand’s website, with, One reviewer who says she and her husband fight over this chair writes, “We’ll definitely be purchasing another Branch chair soon so we no longer have to duke it out. We both have bad backs (my husband has had 3 lumbar surgeries and he’s barely 30 years old) and this chair relieves so much tension; my own posture is better and I love how customizable it can get.” Our editor has (and loves) the and has been eyeing this ergonomic chair for some time.

Adjustable lumbar supportBreathable mesh material

Difficult assemblySome complained about the stiff seat

Arrives in a box, but expert assembly is available Lumbar support Armrest Headrest Back tilt Constantly feeling pressure on your lumbar? This ergonomic office chair is an ideal choice for, thanks to its adjustable lumbar support. With just a turn of its dial, you can shift your support 1.9 inches up or down and 1.2 inches forward or back.

Plus, the W-type cushion evenly distributes your hip pressure—another bonus for your lower back. While the reviews are primarily positive (highlighting the adjustable features and durability), many people do suggest that the chair could be a bit softer, with some suggesting that you use a pillow for additional comfort.

Constantly feeling pressure on your lumbar? This ergonomic office chair is an ideal choice for, thanks to its adjustable lumbar support. With just a turn of its dial, you can shift your support 1.9 inches up or down and 1.2 inches forward or back. Plus, the W-type cushion evenly distributes your hip pressure—another bonus for your lower back.

  • This ad is displayed using third party content and we do not control its accessibility features.
  • Ergonomic office chairs are best for back pain.
  • Experts suggest looking for a model with adjustable height, recline, armrests, and lumbar support.
  • Soft chairs with too much cushioning can encourage you to slouch, which can lead to back pain.

Hard chairs offer more support and can help keep your spine aligned. It depends on your height, but ideally, you want to be able to sit with your feet flat, without elevating your knees too high. If you’re experiencing constant aches and pains at the end of the workday, it may be time to invest in an ergonomic office chair.

  1. The best office chairs for back pain offer adjustable features, such as height and lumbar support, that make it easier to find a comfortable position.
  2. Taking a few minutes to customize your chair can pay off in the long run, with less pain and improved posture.
  3. And if your back has been bothering you,,, and will make a big difference, too.

© 2009 – 2023 mindbodygreen LLC. All rights reserved. : Sitting All Day? You Need To Pay Closer Attention To Your Office Chair

Can a chair help back pain?

If you suffer with back pain, a good ergonomic chair is essential for improvement. If you have an office chair that doesn’t correctly support your body, it can lead to worsened pain and result in more injury. Why is having the right office chair essential for those who suffer with back pain? It’s important to have a good office chair.

  • Your back needs to be well supported when sitting in an office chair, if you find your current office chair isn’t supporting your back, it’s best to ditch it and look for a new ergonomic chair.
  • An adjustable chair allows you to alter the chair to support your body and keep the aches and pains away.
  • The height should be adjustable, your feet always need to be firmly placed on the floor or footrest, if your feet are dangling or your legs are bent into uncomfortable positions, it means your chair height isn’t correct.

This can put a lot of pressure on your lower back. Choosing an ergonomic chair isn’t always straight forward. To make it easier, we’ve put together five of the best office chairs for back pain. The following chairs have been hand-picked by one of our expert assessors, Pete James, who’s personally tried and tested them to help you find the best office chair for back pain.

  1. Originally the product of an NHS brief for an accessibly-priced back care solution, the Orthopaedica family of chairs offers a range of optional adaptations, to tailor the base chair to the individual user’s needs.
  2. In addition to the essential adjustments for seat height, depth and overall chair pitch, it features a tall, height adjustable, sculpted backrest, with optional lumbar and thoracic air cells that allow the user to add – or remove – additional shaping to better match the curve of their back.

The chair has a generously proportioned seat pad, that can be upgraded with an ‘Airtech’ cushion which allows the user to add so shaping to the seat to better support the thighs, as well as a coccyx comfort zone to ease resistance against the tailbone.

For users of more petite body metrics, the 90-version of the chair is a slightly smaller option and when combined with a reduced-depth seat pad, offers a good solution for people of 5’3″ or under. The standard seat pad suits people of an average height. If armrests are needed on the chair, we recommend the ‘multi-adjustable’ arms, which can be set for height, front-to-back depth and width.

There is also the option of a headrest, although this is very much intended for use in the same manner as a cars neck support – it’s there if you absolutely need it, but lacks the adjustability to comfortably enable full-time contact if required. Reliable and adjustable orthopedic office chairs: The Orthopaedica 100 series chair review – YouTube Posture People 112 subscribers Reliable and adjustable orthopedic office chairs: The Orthopaedica 100 series chair review Posture People Watch later Share Copy link Info Shopping Tap to unmute If playback doesn’t begin shortly, try restarting your device.

You might be interested:  Pain In Limb

How should I sit with lower back pain?

What can I do if I have acute low back pain? – The following advice will benefit a majority of people with back pain. If any of the following guidelines causes an increase of pain or spreading of pain to the legs, do not continue the activity and seek the advice of a physician or physical therapist.

Sit as little as possible, and only for short periods of time (10 to 15 minutes). Sit with a back support (such as a rolled-up towel) at the curve of your back. Keep your hips and knees at a right angle. (Use a foot rest or stool if necessary.) Your legs should not be crossed and your feet should be flat on the floor.

Here’s how to find a good sitting position when you’re not using a back support or lumbar roll: Correct sitting position without lumbar support. Correct sitting position with lumbar support.

Sit at the end of your chair and slouch completely. Draw yourself up and accentuate the curve of your back as far as possible. Hold for a few seconds. Release the position slightly (about 10 degrees). This is a good sitting posture. Sit in a high-back, firm chair with arm rests. Sitting in a soft couch or chair will tend to make you round your back and won’t support the curve of your back. At work, adjust your chair height and work station so you can sit up close to your work and tilt it up at you. Rest your elbows and arms on your chair or desk, keeping your shoulders relaxed. When sitting in a chair that rolls and pivots, don’t twist at the waist while sitting. Instead, turn your whole body. When standing up from a sitting position, move to the front of the seat of your chair. Stand up by straightening your legs. Avoid bending forward at your waist. Immediately stretch your back by doing 10 standing backbends.

Driving

Use a back support (lumbar roll) at the curve of your back. Your knees should be at the same level or higher than your hips. Move the seat close to the steering wheel to support the curve of your back. The seat should be close enough to allow your knees to bend and your feet to reach the pedals.

Standing

Stand with your head up, shoulders straight, chest forward, weight balanced evenly on both feet, and your hips tucked in. Avoid standing in the same position for a long time. If possible, adjust the height of the work table to a comfortable level. When standing, try to elevate one foot by resting it on a stool or box. After several minutes, switch your foot position. While working in the kitchen, open the cabinet under the sink and rest one foot on the inside of the cabinet. Change feet every five to 15 minutes.

Stooping, squatting, and kneeling Decide which position to use. Kneel when you have to go down as far as a squat but need to stay that way for awhile. For each of these positions, face the object, keep your feet apart, tighten your stomach muscles, and lower yourself using your legs. Lifting objects

Try to avoid lifting objects if at all possible. If you must lift objects, do not try to lift objects that are awkward or are heavier than 30 pounds. Before you lift a heavy object, make sure you have firm footing. To pick up an object that is lower than the level of your waist, keep your back straight and bend at your knees and hips. Do not bend forward at the waist with your knees straight.

Stand with a wide stance close to the object you are trying to pick up and keep your feet firmly on the ground. Tighten your stomach muscles and lift the object using your leg muscles. Straighten your knees in a steady motion. Don’t jerk the object up to your body. Stand completely upright without twisting. Always move your feet forward when lifting an object. If you are lifting an object from a table, slide it to the edge to the table so that you can hold it close to your body. Bend your knees so that you are close to the object. Use your legs to lift the object and come to a standing position. Avoid lifting heavy objects above waist level. Hold packages close to your body with your arms bent. Keep your stomach muscles tight. Take small steps and go slowly. To lower the object, place your feet as you did to lift, tighten stomach muscles, and bend your hips and knees.

Reaching overhead

Use a foot stool or chair to bring yourself up to the level of what you are reaching. Get your body as close as possible to the object you need. Make sure you have a good idea of how heavy the object is you are going to lift. Use two hands to lift.

Sleeping and lying down

Select a firm mattress and box spring set that does not sag. If necessary, place a board under your mattress. You can also place the mattress on the floor temporarily if necessary. If you’ve always slept on a soft surface, it might be more painful to change to a hard surface. Try to do what’s most comfortable for you. Use a back support (lumbar support) at night to make you more comfortable. A rolled sheet or towel tied around your waist might be helpful. Try to sleep in a position that helps you maintain the curve in your back (such as on your back with a lumbar roll or on your side with your knees slightly bent). Do not sleep on your side with your knees drawn up to your chest. When standing up from a lying position, turn on your side, draw up both knees, and swing your legs on the side of the bed. Sit up by pushing yourself up with your hands. Avoid bending forward at your waist.

Other helpful tips

Avoid activities that require bending forward at the waist or stooping. When coughing or sneezing, try to stand up and bend slightly backward to increase the curve in your spine. Sleep on your side with your knees bent. You can also put a pillow between your knees. Try not to sleep on your stomach.

If you sleep on your back, put pillows under your knees and a small pillow under the small of your back. Get useful, helpful and relevant health + wellness information

How do I choose a chair for my back?

Ideally, a chair back should reach the height of your shoulders as you sit upright. If you are sitting with the correct pelvis and lumbar spine posture, your thoracic spine/rib cage will be over your centre of gravity and, therefore, your upper body will need less muscular support.

Are stiff chairs better for your back?

Home – Health – Is a Hard Chair Better for Your Back? Feeling comfortable entails sinking into a super-plush cushion, but what if it’s actually bad for you? Getting comfortable on a soft chair only lasts for so long. As the hour’s pass, you will begin to feel the aches and pains.

Is it OK to sit on a chair all day?

Summary. Sitting or lying down for too long increases your risk of chronic health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. Too much sitting can also be bad for your mental health.

Is sitting on a chair for 8 hours bad?

When you sit, you use less energy than you do when you stand or move. Research has linked sitting for long periods of time with a number of health concerns. They include obesity and a cluster of conditions — increased blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess body fat around the waist and unhealthy cholesterol levels — that make up metabolic syndrome.

Too much sitting overall and prolonged periods of sitting also seem to increase the risk of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer. Any extended sitting — such as at a desk, behind a wheel or in front of a screen — can be harmful. Researchers analyzed 13 studies of sitting time and activity levels.

They found that those who sat for more than eight hours a day with no physical activity had a risk of dying similar to that posed by obesity and smoking. However, unlike some other studies, this analysis of data from more than 1 million people found that 60 to 75 minutes of moderately intense physical activity a day countered the effects of too much sitting.

  1. Other studies have found that for people who are most active sitting time contributes little to their risk of death.
  2. Overall, research seems to point to the fact that less sitting and more moving contribute to better health.
  3. You might start by simply standing rather than sitting when you have the chance.

Or find ways to walk while you work. For example:

  • Take a break from sitting every 30 minutes.
  • Stand while talking on the phone or watching television.
  • If you work at a desk, try a standing desk — or improvise with a high table or counter.
  • Walk with your colleagues for meetings rather than sitting in a conference room.
  • Position your work surface above a treadmill — with a computer screen and keyboard on a stand or a specialized treadmill-ready vertical desk — so that you can be in motion throughout the day.
You might be interested:  Pain Relief Spray

The impact of movement — even leisurely movement — can be profound. For starters, you’ll burn more calories. This might lead to weight loss and increased energy. Also, physical activity helps maintain muscle tone, your ability to move and your mental well-being, especially as you age.

Is it better to lay in bed or sit in a chair?

Bed Rest & Seating = 24 hour Approach to Care – Best results are achieved when proper therapeutic chairs are used in conjunction with pressure relieving beds and mattresses to manage pressure care and postural needs over a 24 hour period. Overall health and well-being improves when sitting opposed to laying – digestion, elimination, respiration, as well as cognitive health and well-being and motivation for activities such as feeding, communicating, socialising and personal care are all positively impacted.

Can the wrong chair cause back pain?

So, Can A Bad Office Chair Cause Back Pain ? – You now understand what makes a bad office chair. It’s time to address the main question at hand today – c an a bad office chair cause back pain ? Yes. A bad office chair can most definitely cause back pain.

One of the reasons for that is when you’re sitting in an uncomfortable chair, you tend to lean forward, and that puts added pressure on your back. Slouching can lead to strained discs and ligaments, which can, in rare cases, even lead to permanent hunchback. However, sometimes it’s not just the chair’s fault that you have back pain, but also your poor posture that causes further strain.

With that said, let’s take a look at what the medical professionals have to say on the matter.

Why is my chair giving me lower back pain?

Slouching or slumping can stress your back, neck, and shoulders. This postural stress may stretch the ligaments in your spine and cause back pain. Desk chair and computer height: Sitting in a chair without lumbar or lower back support can also contribute to lower back pain.

Is lying down better than sitting for lower back pain?

How to relieve the pain – If you’re experiencing back pain when sitting, your impulse may be to lie down and then try to slowly progress back to sitting, says Dr. Atlas. But this is the wrong approach. You should lie down to relieve the pain, but the goal should be not to return to sitting, but rather to regain your ability to stand and move.

Which position puts least pressure on back?

Lower back pain and body position — Pearson Family Chiropractic Your Palm Coast Chiropractor in Palm Coast, FL USA Your body’s position greatly effects the amount of pressure on your lower back. Laying on your back creates the least amount of pressure.

Just by standing straight you put 4 times the amount of pressure on your lower back as compared to laying on your back. And bending forward while standing will increase the pressure on your lower back by another 50% as compared to standing straight. (Perhaps this is why so many patients’ lower back pain starts just by bending forward.) Your lower back pressure is significantly increased when you bend forward while holding a weight (like bending over to pick up a child or a box) and the heavier the weight the more the pressure.

Now you would think sitting would lower the pressure on your lower back, but the opposite is actually true. Sitting applies almost the same amount of pressure as standing and bending forward. This is why prolonged sitting is so bad for you lower back.

Now if you sit and have poor posture, you increase the pressure on the lower back as well. But the highest amount of pressure is created when you sit and lean forward with weights in your hands. Chiropractic and decompression help to decrease the pressure on you lower back. Call today for an appointment.

: Lower back pain and body position — Pearson Family Chiropractic Your Palm Coast Chiropractor in Palm Coast, FL USA

Should my back be touching my chair?

Again, this puts extra pressure on the lower back and neck. So, to complete the full correct sitting posture, try sitting upright without your back touching the chair back.

Do I really need an ergonomic chair?

Why You Need an Ergonomic Office Chair – I’ve already hinted at the reasons why an ergonomic office chair is worth incorporating into an ergonomic home office (and corporate offices, too). Let’s dig a little deeper into the specifics:

Using ergonomic office chairs leads to great health benefits. Among the top reasons why you should get an ergonomic office chair are the health benefits that come with its regular use. Ergonomic chairs can help ease lower back pain, give support to the spine, keep joints in a neutral position, and alleviate neck and shoulder pains. Using ergonomic office products can also reduce the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders that damage the neck and back. Ergonomic chairs provide more comfort. You spend a third of your day in your office chair. It’s hard to sustain a good work ethic for that long if it’s not comfortable. An ergonomic chair can be adjusted to the body’s natural form (and let’s face it, not everyone is built the same way) so that you’re more comfortable while carrying out necessary work tasks. Ergonomic office products improve productivity. According to a study from Kelton Global, 92% of respondents said that an inadequate workplace would negatively affect their mental health and productivity. Ergonomic furniture increases employee engagement. According to the same Kelton Global study, more than half of American workers believe that having an uncomfortable workspace would cause them displeasure at work. Ergonomic office setups provide cost savings over the long-term. Compared to other types of chairs, ergonomic chairs are more expensive from the onset. But they pay off in the long run because they help employees stay healthy. Worker’s compensation is expensive — health is definitely wealth!

Does high or low chair cause back pain?

Risks When Your Chair Is Too Low – If your knees are higher than your hips, your chair is probably too low. In this case, your hip joints will have an extreme degree of flexion. Most people’s backs can’t handle this well because their hip muscles aren’t flexible enough.

De Carvalho D, Grondin D, Callaghan J. The impact of office chair features on lumbar lordosis, intervertebral joint and sacral tilt angles: a radiographic assessment, Ergonomics,2017;60(10):1393-1404. doi:10.1080/00140139.2016.1265670 Rohlmann A, Zander T, Graichen F, Dreischarf M, Bergmann G. Measured loads on a vertebral body replacement during sitting, Spine J,2011;11(9):870-5. doi:10.1016/j.spinee.2011.06.017 United States Department of Labor. Computer workstations eTool, Kiat P, Jee, Siong K, Lim, Yee S. Development of ergonomics guidelines for improved sitting postures in the classroom among Malaysian university students, American Journal of Applied Sciences,2016;13(8):907-912. doi:10.3844/ajassp.2016.907.912

By Anne Asher, CPT Anne Asher, ACE-certified personal trainer, health coach, and orthopedic exercise specialist, is a back and neck pain expert. Thanks for your feedback!

Can a bad chair cause back pain?

So, Can A Bad Office Chair Cause Back Pain ? – You now understand what makes a bad office chair. It’s time to address the main question at hand today – c an a bad office chair cause back pain ? Yes. A bad office chair can most definitely cause back pain.

One of the reasons for that is when you’re sitting in an uncomfortable chair, you tend to lean forward, and that puts added pressure on your back. Slouching can lead to strained discs and ligaments, which can, in rare cases, even lead to permanent hunchback. However, sometimes it’s not just the chair’s fault that you have back pain, but also your poor posture that causes further strain.

With that said, let’s take a look at what the medical professionals have to say on the matter.

What is the best chair position for posture?

1. PROPER DESK CHAIR POSTURE. – Poor posture (e.g., slumped shoulders, protruding neck and curved spine) is the culprit of physical pain that many office workers experience. It’s crucial to be mindful of the importance of good posture throughout the workday.

Adjust the chair height so your feet are flat on the floor and your knees are in line (or slightly lower) with your hips.Sit up straight and keep your hips far back in the chair.The back of the chair should be somewhat reclined at a 100- to 110-degree angle.Ensure the keyboard is close and directly in front of you.To help your neck stay relaxed and in a neutral position, the monitor should be directly in front of you, a few inches above eye level.Sit at least 20 inches (or an arm’s length) away from the computer screen.Relax the shoulders and be aware of them rising toward your ears or rounding forward throughout the workday.