Dental Light Cure

0 Comments

Dental Light Cure
A dental curing light is a piece of dental equipment that is used for polymerization of light- cure cure Curing is a chemical process employed in polymer chemistry and process engineering that produces the toughening or hardening of a polymer material by cross-linking of polymer chains. https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Curing_(chemistry)

Curing (chemistry) – Wikipedia

resin-based composites. It can be used on several different dental materials that are curable by light. The light used falls under the visible blue light spectrum.
Exposure Time – Some authors have found that when increasing the thickness of the samples, the exposure time should also increase to achieve a higher DOC.22,30,33,36-38 In general, the materials studied showed that the exposure time had a greater effect on the DOC of 4-mm samples compared to 2-mm samples ( Table 3 ). FSU was used as the control in this study. The manufacturers recommend light curing “body” (B) shades in 2-mm increments for 20 seconds. In the present study, 2-mm increments of A1B shade reached an adequate DOC when light cured for 20 seconds (0.89). This outcome was comparable to the results of the study done by Ilie and others, 1 who suggested that a minimum of 20 seconds of light-curing exposure time should be applied to a 2-mm increment of material light cured with an LED LCU. According to the present study, 2-mm samples of A3B shade required a higher exposure time (40 seconds) to obtain a B/T ratio higher than 0.80 (0.88). SF samples of 2-mm-thickness shade A1 had a higher DOC when cured for 20 seconds (0.90) compared to 40 seconds (0.84). The statistical difference between these groups was significant ( p =0.003, which is very close to the Bonferroni correction value of p <0.004). If the sample size would have been larger, there is a possibility of not finding any difference between light curing for 20 or 40 seconds for 2-mm-thick light shade samples. In 4-mm-thick samples, increasing the light exposure time increased the DOC of samples evaluated (0.82 to 0.88), as has been stated in other studies.22,30,33,36-38 The effect of time exposure on DOC of TBF was similar to FSU. Two-millimeter samples of either IVA or IVB shade showed an adequate DOC when light cured for 20 seconds. When thickness was increased to 4 mm, samples exposed to a 40-second light cure showed significantly higher DOC than samples cured for 20 seconds, but only the light shade had a value above 0.80 (0.83).

Is dental curing light safe?

Dental staff safety – For dental staff, the eyes are particularly at risk. Exposure to high levels of blue light can immediately burn the retina, while prolonged absorption of low levels of blue light can contribute to macular degeneration. As curing lights increase in intensity, ocular tissues can become overexposed in less than 10 curing cycles.

Which types of curing lights can be used in dentistry?

Dental Light-Curing Units – Dental light-curing units are handheld devices that are used for the polymerization of visible light–activated dental materials. The four types of light-curing units that are currently available include quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH), light-emitting diode (LED), plasma arc curing (PAC), and Argon laser units.

  1. QTH light-curing units are the most widely used and are made of a quartz bulb containing a tungsten filament in a halogen environment.
  2. QTH units emit ultraviolet irradiation and visible light (broad-spectrum), which is filtered to limit the wavelength output to between 400 and 500 nm while also minimizing heat.

The intensity of light emitted by a QTH bulb ranges from 400 to 1200 mW/cm 2 and can decrease with use. The use of a radiometer is recommended for the routine monitoring of the light intensity, and permitting the built-in fan to cool the QTH bulb is recommended to facilitate optimal function of the unit.

  1. LED light-curing units emit light in the blue part of the visible spectrum, typically between 440 and 490 nm, and do not emit heat.
  2. Therefore LED units do not require filters.
  3. They can be powered by rechargeable batteries because they require low wattage, and they are quieter than QTH units because they do not need a cooling fan.

Initial versions of LED units emitted a lower intensity of light, whereas newer versions incorporate multiple LEDs with a variety of ranges of wavelengths to broaden the spectrum of the emitted light and increase the overall intensity in order to adequately polymerize all visible-light activated dental materials.

  1. PAC light-curing units contain a xenon gas that is ionized to produce plasma.
  2. The high-intensity white light emitted is filtered to minimize heat and to limit the output to the violet-blue part of the visible spectrum (400–500 nm).
  3. Argon laser units emit the highest intensity and emit light at a single wavelength (approximately 490 nm).

The higher costs associated with the use and maintenance of the PAC and Argon laser units has limited their widespread use in dentistry. Visible light-activated dental materials contain an initiator such as camphorquinone (CQ) that absorbs light at the appropriate wavelength (approximately 470 nm for CQ).

The free radicals necessary for the initiation of polymerization are generated when the initiator combines with an organic amine such as dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). The wavelength, intensity, and duration of exposure to light determine the number of photons absorbed by the initiator and therefore impact optimal polymerization.

Factors such as light-curing unit intensity, angle of illumination, diameter of the tip of the light source, distance from the light source, and duration of exposure can significantly affect the number of free radicals formed, thereby making this system highly technique sensitive.

  1. Initiators other than CQ are also used in visible light-activated materials.
  2. Because they absorb light at different wavelengths than CQ, it is critical that the light-curing unit used emits light at the requisite wavelength for that particular initiator.
  3. Newer light-curing units have higher intensities, typically greater than 1000 mW/cm 2, which permit either shorter durations of cure for a given depth of cure or increased depth of cure for a given duration of cure.

The use of these higher intensity lights can, however, produce higher shrinkage stresses within the restoration. It is important to remember that the type of light-curing unit and curing mode used impact the polymerization kinetics, polymerization shrinkage, and associated stresses, microhardness, depth of cure, degree of conversion, color change, and microleakage in visible-light activated restorations.

Lastly, precautions such as protective eyewear and light shields are critical for the safety of the patient and clinic personnel when using dental light-curing units. In attempts to reduce polymerization shrinkage, resin molecules longer than Bis-GMA have been placed in resin-based composites. An example would be EMA-6, which can be found in Filtek Z250 ( Fig.21.9 ; 3M ESPE Dental Products, St.

Paul, MN).39 Problems that may be associated with light-activated resin-based composites include polymerization toward the light source, sensitivity of composite to ambient light, and variability in the depth of polymerization due to the intensity of light penetration.

Polymerization toward the light source may cause the resin-based composite to pull away from the walls of the preparation. Sensitivity of resin-based composite to ambient light may cause initial polymerization before placement of the material into the preparation. Variability in the depth of light penetration, differences in curing light intensity, diameter of the tip of the light source, and time of light exposure can result in variations of polymerization.

The benefits of light-activated resin composites include ease of manipulation, control of polymerization, and lack of need for mixing. Since mixing is not required with light-activated composites, it is less likely that air will be incorporated and form voids in the mixture.

You might be interested:  Ulcerative Proctitis Cure

What are the side effects of dental light cure?

Over exposure to blue light cure without protective measurements can induce apoptosis to the cornea, increased ocular inflammation and dryness of the eye. The short term risks associated with dental Lights cure is particularly low if safety measures are used.

How long do you cure with a UV LED light?

How long to cure gel nails with LED light? To cure gel nails, you’re going to need a UV LED curing lamp, typically the curing time for gel nails is around 30 seconds. However, some products and brands may need a bit longer. If you’re looking for a new UV LED lamp to cure your clients’ nails manicures, then we recommend the by Bio Sculpture.

What is the advantage of light cure?

Advantages of LED Light Curing vs. Broad-Spectrum As interest in LED technology grows, it is becoming an ideal alternative for conventional broad-spectrum light-curing that has been the industry standard for several decades. LEDs offer many advantages over mercury-arc bulbs.

LEDs cure cooler for better thermal management and offer very stable intensity which translates into more consistent process control. LED light-curing systems start up instantly, provide immediate light energy, and have an expected useful LED life of over 20,000 hours, which results in significantly reduced downtime and lower light replacement costs when compared to conventional lamp systems.

LED curing technology offers many benefits over traditional broad-spectrum UV light curing such as lower operating costs and “green” attributes that eliminate mercury and ozone safety risks. Cooler Temperatures LED systems operate at lower temperatures than conventional broad-spectrum lamps. The cooler curing enables better thermal management, and their narrow wavelength spectrum emission minimizes thermal rise. Because some substrates are sensitive to higher temperatures, curing light-curable materials fully without damaging the substrate can require multiple passes under a broad-spectrum lamp at lower intensity levels.

  1. Those extra steps can be made unnecessary by switching to the cooler LED units.
  2. An additional advantage of LED systems’ cooler temperatures is that they do not need the same level of heat extraction (exhaust), eliminating the expensive costs for installation and operation.
  3. Longer Life Another benefit of LED curing sources is that they last longer.

Although LEDs also degrade in intensity output over time, a typical broad-spectrum spot-cure lamp might last about 2,000 hours before intensity output levels degrade to about 50% of initial levels. Conversely, LED curing units can often provide over 50% of their original intensity output much longer.

  • More Uniform Cures LEDs provide a more uniform distribution of light across the cure area for more consistent results.
  • Instant On LEDs power up instantly and do not require any warm-up time.
  • This allows production to start immediately increasing throughput.
  • More Energy Efficient & Environmentally Friendly LED systems are much more electrically efficient and more environmentally friendly than mercury-arc curing lamps.

The LEDs run at lower voltages and require no warm-up period, cutting electrical costs. They are also not listed as an electrical hazard the way that conventional mercury-arc lamps are., because of their unique design, achieve uniform frequency and intensity output for consistent cures that facilitate better process control and increased manufacturing throughput.

Compact equipment that reduces size and cost of the light-curing systemFlexible light-delivery configurationVery stable lamp intensity for consistent process controlLong service life eliminates bulb replacement and reduces maintenance costs compared to conventional curing systemsHigh electrical efficiency and instant on/off capability lowers operational costs and increases speed of automated assembly

Get our to learn more about Dymax LED light-curing systems. : Advantages of LED Light Curing vs. Broad-Spectrum

How strong should a dental curing light be?

Introduction – Over three decades have passed since the beginning of the extensive use of composite resins in dentistry, and the demand for using esthetic restorative materials is still on the increase ( 1 ). Resins must begin polymerization in order to perform operation.

  1. During this process, monomer units bond with each other to build long and heavy polymers.
  2. Due to the increased use of optical composites, the importance of polymerization has become more prominent.
  3. The strength of these restorations depends on the degree of polymerization of composite resins.
  4. Incomplete polymerization produces adverse biological effects, increasing water absorption, composite solubility, and reducing hardness.

Various factors contribute to the polymerization of the composites, and they include the wavelength and intensity of the output of light curing units, duration of radiation, dimensions and location of the dental cavity, direction and distance of the tip of the device (related to the composite), the composition of the composite, the wavelength and bandwidth of the curing light, the intensity of the curing light, the irradiation time, and color and thickness of the composite ( 2, 3 ).

  1. In composite resins, camphorquinone is the light-sensitive component, which responds to irradiation by creating free radicals and initiates the polymerization process ( 4 ).
  2. An appropriate intensity of light with the maximum absorption wavelength range of camphorquinone is the main factor in the polymerization of these resins.

If the light output intensity decreases, it will adversely influence the clinical and cosmetic performance. The light intensity of curing devices is defined by the International Organization for Standardization as the ISO 4049 standard, which recommends an intensity of 300 mW/cm2 with a wavelength bandwidth of 400-515 nm on the tip of the light curing device.

At this standard wavelength, the minimum depth of cure is assumed to be 1.5 mm, which is 50% of the length of the composite specimen ( 3 ). The reduction in the light intensity of the device can affect the success rate of the restorative methods via reducing the degree of convergence of composites, which leads to an increase in microleakage and recurrent caries ( 5 ).

The light source for polymerization of composite resins are available in four types: quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH), light-emitting diode (LED), plasma arc curing (PAC), and argon laser. Halogen-based curing lamps have several limitations. One of the main disadvantages of these lamps is the high energy consumption.

Only 1% of the consumed energy by these devices turns into light and almost all the remaining energy is converted into heat. The heat generated by these lamps should be eliminated, and this requires expensive thermal filters. Cooling fans are also loud and bulky. Also, the longevity of halogen lamps is short (between 40 and 100 hours) ( 6 ).

In 1995, Mills and colleagues presented solid-state LED technology for the polymerization of dental materials capable of being activated with light. In LEDs, instead of hot strands as used in halogen lamps, semiconductor connections are employed to produce light.

These lamps have a very long shelf life of about 1,000 hours and can withstand mechanical shocks and vibrations with very low error rates ( 7 ). LEDs are also capable of producing blue light at a wavelength of 440-480 nm. LEDs can be cordless and are almost silent while being operated ( 7 ). In QTH and LED light curing devices, the main factors affecting the intensity of light output are: inappropriate performance of the lamp and filter, breakage and pollution of the device tip, the blurring of the bulb, the failure of electrical components, and defect in light transmitting fibers ( 6, 7 ).

In these devices, if maintenance is not carried out routinely, after a while, there will be some problems with the lamp, fan, or power supply ( 8 ). There are two main problems with the quality of cured resin composite in the office: 1) Composite surface hardness is not a reliable guide because even at a low light intensity, the surface can sufficiently harden while the depth of the cure is not adequate.

Moreover, it is impossible for the dentist to distinguish completely-cured composite resin from the one incompletely cured using a device with a low light intensity ( 9 ).2) The output light of the device decreases as the device is used more, but this is not detectable by the unarmed eye because sometimes a seemingly bright light is not suitable for wavelengths.

Furthermore, insufficient radiation intensity is not always compensated for by prolonging exposure time ( 10 ). Therefore, a digital radiometer is needed to measure the intensity of the curing light of the units to determine when the device needs to repaired or replaced ( 11 ).

The aims of the present study were four-fold: 1) measuring the light intensity of light curing units used in the offices, 2) comparing the light intensity of LED and QTH units, 3) determining the relationship between the clinical age of these devices and their light intensity, and 4) exploring the reasons for and the frequency of repairing these units.

The findings of this study underscore the importance of timely fixing or replacing defective light curing devices, which can consequently ensure the continued quality of restorative treatments. This improvement can increase public health in the long run.

You might be interested:  Knock Knees Cure Exercise

What is the disadvantage of light cure?

The disadvantages of UV light-activated systems include: (1) Curing units require a 5-minute warm-up period. (2) Depth of light penetration is 1 to 2 mm at best. (3) Maintaining the light at 100% efficiency is difficult, and (4) UV radiation can cause corneal burns.

Is too much UV light bad for teeth?

In addition, UV lighting comes with short and long-term risk factors that are important to make note of. Short-term risk factors include burns and bleeding of the gums, tooth sensitivity and even sunburn to the skin, while long-term risk factors may lead to wear on the teeth’s enamel and even oral cancer.

Do dentists use UV resin?

When you’re getting ready to visit the dentist to get a tooth filling, you may be presented with several options. Although your dentist will help you decide which is best, you also get to have a say in the matter and should be able to make an informed decision.

When the choice is between a composite material and metal, there are three materials to consider: composite resin, silver amalgam, and gold. As you’ll see, there are advantages and disadvantages to each of these. Keep reading to find out more about these tooth filling options and to decide which is best for you.

Composite Resin Also known as tooth-colored fillings, these are one of the most popular cavity-filling materials today. This is primarily because they’re the most aesthetically pleasing option. Composite resin is a mixture of plastic and glass or quartz.

It’s applied in layers which are cured using a UV light. They’re used for filling cavities and repairing chipped or cracked teeth. Here are some of the benefits of composite resin: ●Can be matched to the exact color of teeth ●Are used both in front teeth and back teeth ●Chemically bond to the tooth for more structural support ●Less of the actual tooth needs to be removed ●Cheaper than gold Some of the drawbacks are: ●Not ideal for large cavities ●More expensive than silver amalgam ●Not always covered by insurance ●Can only withstand moderate chewing pressure ●Long application time (up to 20 minutes longer than metal fillings) ●Only last around 5 years ●Can chip off teeth depending on its location As you can see, there are plenty of reasons to choose composite resin, as well as some to choose something else.

A small crack or cavity in the front of your mouth is best for composite resin. Silver Amalgam One of the metal options for tooth fillings is silver amalgam. This is the most popular type of tooth filling because it’s durable and affordable. However, it’s also considered unsightly which is why many people prefer the other options.

  1. Silver amalgam is made up of a mixture of silver, copper, mercury, and tin.
  2. Rest assured that when mercury is mixed with these other materials, it is completely safe, even when used in your mouth.
  3. Reasons why you may choose silver amalgam include: ●Cheapest tooth filling option ●Can last up to 15 years ●Strong enough to withstand chewing forces ●Can be used to fill large cavities ●Fast application time Some reasons to pick another type of filling are: ●Don’t match natural teeth ●Can discolor other nearby teeth ●Expanding and contracting in the presence of hot and cold foods can cause teeth to crack ●Requires more of the actual tooth to be removed ●Around 1% of people are allergic to mercury Overall, silver amalgam is the best option for those who can’t afford composite or gold fillings and who has a medium or large cavity in the back of the mouth where the filling won’t be easily seen.

Gold Tooth Fillings Having been part of dentistry for over 2500 years, gold fillings are here to stay. While they’re up to ten times more expensive than silver amalgam, there are also a lot of benefits that make them ideal. Gold inlay tooth fillings are actually made up of an alloy of gold, copper, and other metals.

  1. Gold foil is another type of filling used for small cracks and cavities which is applied directly on the tooth.
  2. Here are some advantages to having cast gold fillings put in: ●Can last up to 30 years ●Doesn’t corrode ●Strong enough to withstand chewing forces ●Considered more aesthetically-pleasing than silver amalgam ●Can be sold as scrap gold after removal Some disadvantages include: ●More expensive than other options ●Require several visits to the dentist ●If placed next to silver amalgam, can cause galvanic shock to occur ●Doesn’t match natural tooth color If you have large cavities in the back of your mouth and want a filler that’s going to last for many years, gold should be your material of choice.

Even though it is more expensive to place, its longevity may make it worth it. How to Choose a Filler Material There are several things to consider when deciding between composite resin and a metal tooth filler. Not every material will be best for every situation.

Different dentists may also have more skill and knowledge of certain materials. Next, we’ll look at some of the things you need to consider. Location of Tooth Most people would agree that the teeth at the front of the mouth are best filled with composite resin. This allows the repairs to blend perfectly with your natural tooth color, hiding the damage.

Teeth in the back of the mouth, on the other hand, don’t need to be as carefully colored. For this reason, it’s common to have silver amalgam and gold fillings in the back of the mouth. Type of Damage There are many types of damage a tooth can sustain, including cracks, fractures, cavities, and chips.

  1. Each type requires a specific type of repair which may not work with every material.
  2. Size of Cavity When it’s a cavity that needs to be repaired, the size has to be considered when looking at fill material options.
  3. For example, composite material can’t be used in larger cavities because it’s not as strong as metal fillings.

Cost The final thing you’ll have to consider is the cost of the filling. Even if you have dental insurance, not every type of filling will be covered in every circumstance. Composite resin is often not covered if being chosen strictly for cosmetic reasons.

While gold is the most expensive tooth filler, some other things to keep in mind are that it can last twice as long as silver fillings and six times as long as composite resin, plus can be sold after it’s been removed. Where to Get a Tooth Filling With a better understanding of the tooth filling options you have, you’re ready to make an informed decision next time you need one.

If you’re ready to schedule an appointment to have a cavity filled, then contact us today. One of our staff members will be more than happy to assist you in fixing your smile.

Can light therapy heal gums?

Journal List Germs v.3(4); 2013 Dec PMC3882849

As a library, NLM provides access to scientific literature. Inclusion in an NLM database does not imply endorsement of, or agreement with, the contents by NLM or the National Institutes of Health. Learn more about our disclaimer. Germs.2013 Dec; 3(4): 126–127.

Besides their role in the periodontal attachment loss and subsequent loss of teeth, periodontal pathogens such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans have been associated with systemic diseases.1 Some recently published data 2 brings to our attention an interesting approach to treating periodontal disease – the dental halogen or LED curing lamp.

The authors showed that strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis cultivated in vitro in planktonic state were almost completely killed after exposure to “blue light” for a duration of 15 ( P.

  • Gingivalis ) to 60 ( F.
  • Nucleatum ) seconds.
  • However, the same study showed that only P.
  • Gingivalis strains were susceptible to this phototoxicity while in biofilm state.
  • The authors’ conclusion was that the dental halogen curing light was “effective in reducing periodontal pathogens in planktonic state” 2 and that this method could be used for the treatment of periodontal disease.
You might be interested:  Exercise For Coccyx Pain

These results could be very encouraging, if it weren’t for the fact that the periodontal pathogens mainly organize themselves in vivo in the form of biofilm – the main reason why systemic antibiotherapy alone is ineffective in the treatment of periodontal disease.

  1. As a recent literature review article 3 pointed out, systemic administration of amoxicillin and metronidazole combined with scaling and root planning (SRP) of the teeth yielded better results than SRP alone.
  2. However, there isn’t a clear opinion on whether the better outcomes for combined SRP and amoxicillin treatment are due to the antimicrobial effects of amoxicillin, or to its role in upregulating cytokine expression, as another study 4 has pointed out.

To support the theory of Song et al., 2 it would be interesting to determine how many patients undergoing yearly in-office dental bleaching procedures accelerated with LED lamps later develop periodontal disease. The study hypothesis that Song et al.2 propose is very interesting and may be worth pursuing.

In my opinion, there is need for further randomized controlled studies to assess the efficacy of this method combined with SRP and systemic antibiotherapy. However, caution is advised. A recent study 5 by Yoshida et al. showed that blue light emitted by LED light sources induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), which could have adverse effects on human gingival fibroblasts.

In the light of this information, one might question whether exposing the gingival sulcus after SRP – a minimally invasive, but nonetheless invasive procedure – to a light source capable of inducing ROS is a good therapeutic choice or not.

Can a dental curing light burn your lip?

Light curing generates heat.52-55 In 2012, three clinical cases were reported where one brand of LED curing light may have caused burns to the lips.56 The authors recommended that no soft tissue should be near the tip of the curing light.

Is blue LED light bad for your teeth?

Does Blue Light Work for Teeth Whitening? – Another use for blue light in recent years has been for teeth whitening. You may wonder why blue light is used for teeth whitening, similar to how it’s used for light curing. Blue light itself cannot whiten the teeth.

  • Instead, blue light is used to activate a chemical reaction.
  • You’ll apply a specialized whitening gel to the patient’s teeth containing either carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide.
  • The blue light activates the compounds in the gel and helps break it apart faster.
  • It’s this chemical reaction that removes strains from the surface of the teeth.

Both in-office and home whitening kits work the same way. Research into the effectiveness of using blue light to whiten the teeth is mixed, with some studies claiming using light as an accelerant was ineffective. In contrast, other studies said it did seem to be effective.

Which cures faster LED or UV?

Curing Time – LED nail lamps cure gel polish faster than UV lamps. LED lamps take 30-60 seconds to cure each coat, while UV lamps take 2-3 minutes per coat. An LED nail lamp is the better option if you want a quick and efficient curing time.

What is better UV or LED lamp?

UV vs. LED Nail Lamps: Which One to Choose? – Overall, both UV and LED nail lamps offer many benefits for at-home nail care, They speed up the drying time of your polish, make your manicure last longer, and create a more professional-looking finish. While UV lamps emit more UV radiation than LED lamps, they are generally considered safe when used in moderation.

What is the difference between UV light and UV LED?

LED UV technology works in the spectral range between 365 nm and 405 nm. UV lamps, on the other hand, cure in a wavelength range up to 450 nm.

How long to use UV light on teeth?

Common Ways To Whiten Your Teeth –

Receiving a professional whitening treatment is the fastest, safest, and most effective way to whiten your teeth. The procedure can take anywhere from 60-90 minutes and patients leave with 2-3 shades lighter teeth. The most popular teeth whitening method right now is a UV light paired with gel. The gel is normally peroxide-based and is used alongside the UV light. The light activates the peroxide and expedites the whitening process. If used every day, you can see results within 10-14 days. Another method that is popular and often drawn to is whitening strips. But these aren’t great for sensitive teeth. They also require a commitment to wearing them for 1-2 hours every day for 2-3 weeks. You can go to any drugstore now and find a whitening toothpaste. The toothpaste contains enzymes that eliminate stains with a toothbrush. If this is done twice a day, results can range anywhere from two to six weeks. Whitening rinses are known to take the longest when it comes to seeing results. Try using a rinse for a few minutes each day for the best results.

How long do you have to use blue light on your gums?

Using it inside the mouth for 30 seconds daily might help prevent much periodontal disease.

Can light therapy heal gums?

Journal List Germs v.3(4); 2013 Dec PMC3882849

As a library, NLM provides access to scientific literature. Inclusion in an NLM database does not imply endorsement of, or agreement with, the contents by NLM or the National Institutes of Health. Learn more about our disclaimer. Germs.2013 Dec; 3(4): 126–127.

Besides their role in the periodontal attachment loss and subsequent loss of teeth, periodontal pathogens such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans have been associated with systemic diseases.1 Some recently published data 2 brings to our attention an interesting approach to treating periodontal disease – the dental halogen or LED curing lamp.

The authors showed that strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis cultivated in vitro in planktonic state were almost completely killed after exposure to “blue light” for a duration of 15 ( P.

  1. Gingivalis ) to 60 ( F.
  2. Nucleatum ) seconds.
  3. However, the same study showed that only P.
  4. Gingivalis strains were susceptible to this phototoxicity while in biofilm state.
  5. The authors’ conclusion was that the dental halogen curing light was “effective in reducing periodontal pathogens in planktonic state” 2 and that this method could be used for the treatment of periodontal disease.

These results could be very encouraging, if it weren’t for the fact that the periodontal pathogens mainly organize themselves in vivo in the form of biofilm – the main reason why systemic antibiotherapy alone is ineffective in the treatment of periodontal disease.

As a recent literature review article 3 pointed out, systemic administration of amoxicillin and metronidazole combined with scaling and root planning (SRP) of the teeth yielded better results than SRP alone. However, there isn’t a clear opinion on whether the better outcomes for combined SRP and amoxicillin treatment are due to the antimicrobial effects of amoxicillin, or to its role in upregulating cytokine expression, as another study 4 has pointed out.

To support the theory of Song et al., 2 it would be interesting to determine how many patients undergoing yearly in-office dental bleaching procedures accelerated with LED lamps later develop periodontal disease. The study hypothesis that Song et al.2 propose is very interesting and may be worth pursuing.

In my opinion, there is need for further randomized controlled studies to assess the efficacy of this method combined with SRP and systemic antibiotherapy. However, caution is advised. A recent study 5 by Yoshida et al. showed that blue light emitted by LED light sources induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), which could have adverse effects on human gingival fibroblasts.

In the light of this information, one might question whether exposing the gingival sulcus after SRP – a minimally invasive, but nonetheless invasive procedure – to a light source capable of inducing ROS is a good therapeutic choice or not.

Which is the appropriate curing time for light cured dental sealants?

The sealant material will be completely cured 60 seconds after mixing. Immediately after the material has cured the sealant should be evaluated for retention, flaws, and occlusion.