Food Which Cure Stammering

0 Comments

Food Which Cure Stammering
Stammering or stuttering is a type of speech impairment where sounds or syllables are repeated involuntarily or there are unintended gaps in between words when the person is trying to speak. People develop stutters due to genetic flaws, motor functioning defects, coordination problems or due to psychological stressors.

The condition can result in anxiety, depression and withdrawal from verbal communication. How does homeopathy help? A stutter can be practised away or corrected by speech therapy but there is no specific medicine that can be used to cure stammering. Homeopathic medicines can provide relief from the symptoms by fixing flawed nervous functions, improve motor coordination and modify the vocal apparatus.

Different homeopathic treatments can be used depending on the nature of the condition. The following is a list of homeopathic remedies and lifestyle changes that can be used to address the problem: 1. Foods rich in vitamin B6 like nuts, fish, bananas and chicken should be consumed regularly by children who have a stutter to help with motor functions.2.

  1. Adults should avoid caffeine, tobacco and other recreational drugs as they cause hyperstimulation of the nervous system.3.
  2. Stramonium (jimsonweed) can be used when the stammering is violent and the person distorts his facial muscles heavily in order to be able to speak.4.
  3. Lycopodium (club moss) can be useful for stammering as well as depression, memory weakness and sleep problems.

This is especially helpful if the patient struggles with the last few words of a sentence.5. Spigelia is beneficial for a mild stutter at the beginning of a sentence, often followed by undisturbed speech.6. Causticum is prescribed when emotional excitability causes stammering, twitching of the facial muscles or problems in the vocal chords.7.

Staphysagria can aid in reducing social anxiety which often causes stammering i.e. the stammer only appears while interacting with strangers or authority figures.8. Nux vomica (strychnine) is the medicine to use when stammering is a result of extreme stress or overwork.9. Fright or shock often causes speechlessness or stammering.

Aconite can provide immediate relief in such cases.10. Lachesis is an effective homeopathic medicine when the patient stutters over specific letters or syllables.11. Gelsemium is used to treat stuttering after severe viral infections when the patient complains of a heavy tongue and lack of general coordination.

What is the fastest way to cure stammering?

Speaking to someone who stammers – When talking to someone who stammers, try to:

avoid finishing their sentences if they’re struggling to get their words outgive them enough time to finish what they’re saying without interruptingavoid asking them to speak faster or more slowlyshow interest in what they’re saying, not how they’re saying it, and maintain eye contact

Speak slowly and calmly when talking to a young child who stammers. Use short sentences and simple language to reduce the communication demands on the child. Do not overwhelm your child by talking too quickly. Make sure you give them time to understand and process what you’ve said, and work out their response. Page last reviewed: 17 March 2023 Next review due: 17 March 2026

Can stammering be cured naturally?

There is no ‘cure’, no pill or therapy which will make stammering go away. There are therapies and interventions which can help people manage their stammer and learn to speak more easily. This is often not a permanent fix and the struggle will still be there.

Can diet help with stuttering?

Gut Bacteria and Stuttering: A Potentially New Dimension in Stuttering Treatment – There is no direct evidence that supports the claim that diet impacts stuttering. However, we have to consider that stuttering is a multifactorial disorder. A number of neurotransmitters (chemicals) in the brain impact stuttering including dopamine.

A study on the impact of medications that directly affect the dopaminergic and serotonergic mechanisms shows that medication, which downregulates the release of dopamine may help reduce stuttering. This shows that dopamine is one of the key factors that influence childhood-onset fluency disorders like stuttering.

Groundbreaking research by Dinan, Butler and Cryan on gut bacteria highlights their ability to influence the levels of neurotransmitters in the brain. Psychobiotics or the study of micro-organisms with the ability to influence behavior may pave a new path for the treatment of several disorders including stuttering.

  • It is indeed possible to increase or decrease the levels of “good” gut bacteria by controlling the food one consumes.
  • Who knows – following a particular diet to increase the population of helpful bacteria and reduce the secretion of dopamine in the brain may soon be one way to control one’s stuttering.

However, at this moment, the research is still at a nascent phase, and taking control over stuttering via dietary modifications is still a hypothesis, albeit, a highly realistic one.

Does stammering affect the brain?

“G-g-g-g-g-ood morning” or “One b-b-b-bread roll, please” are daily obstacles for people who stutter. However, so far, not much is known about the causes of persistent developmental stuttering, which is the most frequent speech disorder. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and the University Medical Center Göttingen have recently discovered that a hyperactive network in the right frontal part of the brain plays a crucial role in this deficit. It inhibits speech movement planning and execution, thereby interrupting the flow of speech. One per cent of adults and five per cent of children are unable to achieve what most of us take for granted—speaking fluently. © shutterstock” data-picture=”base64;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”> One per cent of adults and five per cent of children are unable to achieve what most of us take for granted—speaking fluently. Instead, they struggle with words, often repeating the beginning of a word, for example “G-g-g-g-g-ood morning” or get stuck with single sounds, such as “Ja” for “January” although they know exactly what they want to say. What processes in the brain cause people to stutter? Previous studies showed imbalanced activity of the two brain hemispheres in people who stutter compared to fluent speakers: A region in the left frontal brain is hypoactive, whereas the corresponding region in the right hemisphere is hyperactive. However, the cause of this imbalance is unclear. Does the less active left hemisphere reflect a dysfunction and causes the right side to compensate for this failure? Or is it the other way around and the hyperactive right hemisphere suppresses activity in the left hemisphere and is therefore the real cause of stuttering? Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig and at the University Medical Center Göttingen have now gained crucial insights: The hyperactivity in regions of the right hemisphere seems to be central for stuttering: “Parts of the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) are particularly active when we stop actions, such as hand or speech movements”, says Nicole Neef, neuroscientist at MPI CBS and first author of the new study. “If this region is overactive, it hinders other brain areas that are involved in the initiation and termination of movements. In people who stutter, the brain regions that are responsible for speech movements are particularly affected.” Typically, the right IFG stops the flow of speech, whereas the left one supports it. In people who stutter, these two areas are conversely activated: The right IFG is overactive and shows tightened connections with the frontal aslant tract (FAT), which is a sign of a strengthened movement inhibition. This interrupts the flow of speech and might inhibit activity in the left IFG. © MPI CBS” data-picture=”base64;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”> Two of these areas are the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), which processes the planning of speech movements, and the left motor cortex, which controls the actual speech movements. “If these two processes are sporadically inhibited, the affected person is unable to speak fluently”, explains Neef. The scientists investigated these relations using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in adults who have stuttered since childhood. In the study, the participants imagined themselves saying the names of the months. They used this method of imaginary speaking to ensure that real speech movements did not interfere with the sensitive MRI signals. The neuroscientists were then able to analyse the brain by scanning for modified fibre tracts in the overactive right hemisphere regions in participants who stutter. Indeed, they found a fibre tract in the hyperactive right network that was much stronger in affected persons than in those without speech disorders. “The stronger the frontal aslant tract (FAT), the more severe the stuttering. From previous studies we know that this fibre tract plays a crucial role in fine-tuning signals that inhibit movements”, the neuroscientist states. “The hyperactivity in this network and its stronger connections could suggest that one cause of stuttering lies in the neural inhibition of speech movements.”

You might be interested:  How To Cure Frozen Shoulder Quickly At Home

What is the root cause of stammering?

Acquired or late-onset stammering – is relatively rare and happens in older children and adults as a result of a head injury, stroke or progressive neurological condition. It can also be caused by certain drugs, medicines, or psychological or emotional trauma.

Does stammering reduce with age?

What Is Stuttering? – Many young kids go through a stage between the ages of 2 and 5 when they stutter. This might make them:

repeat certain syllables, words, or phrases prolong them stop, making no sound for certain sounds and syllables

Stuttering is a form of dysfluency (dis-FLOO-en-see), an interruption in the flow of speech. In many cases, stuttering goes away on its own by age 5. In some kids, it goes on for longer. Effective treatments are available to help a child overcome it.

Is stammering Genetic?

Causes – Researchers continue to study the underlying causes of developmental stuttering. A combination of factors may be involved. Possible causes of developmental stuttering include:

Abnormalities in speech motor control. Some evidence indicates that abnormalities in speech motor control, such as timing, sensory and motor coordination, may be involved. Genetics. Stuttering tends to run in families. It appears that stuttering can result from inherited (genetic) abnormalities.

Does stuttering get worse with age?

The Age Factor in Stuttering Ehud Yairi, Ph.D.University of Illinois Age is among the strongest risk factors for stuttering with several important implications. Although the disorder begins within a wide age-range, current robust evidence indicates that, for a very large proportion of cases, it erupts during the preschool period.

Data obtained at the University of Illinois Stuttering Research Program revealed that for 65% of the child participants, stuttering onset occurred prior to age 3; the figure rose to 85% by 3 1/2 years of age (Yairi & Ambrose, 2005). Leaving room for some sampling errors, children past age 4 face a relatively low risk for stuttering.

From clinical considerations, these statistics call for greater emphasis on preparing clinicians for working with early childhood stuttering. Age brings out other factors. The fact that the critical age for stuttering onset parallels the age span when significant rapid developments occur in the anatomy of the speech system, as well as in complex language and articulatory skills, invites speculations that interferences in these maturational processes contribute to stuttering; hence the possibility of relations among stuttering, language, and articulation.

Although our own data (Watkins, Yairi, & Ambrose, 1999), and those of our colleagues from Germany (Rommel et. al., 1999), show that the language skills of children who stutter, as a group, meet or exceed norms, we suspect that there are differences in the ways in which they process language. One research priority consequent to information about age at onset is experimental manipulation of similarities and/or differences in language processing and production between children who stutter near the onset of the disorder and normally fluent children, particularly in terms of the nature of linguistic knowledge and the time course of knowledge activation.

Varied responses to semantic and phonological distracters, slower reaction time, and/or alternative activation paths may reveal differences in language processing. One of the intriguing questions is: does age at stuttering onset “prior to, or after, a certain point in language development” underlie distinct subtypes of the disorder? Currently, scientists in several laboratories are pursuing such issues.

  1. Brain imaging studies of children should also enhance understanding of this issue.
  2. Our team members, Chang, Erickson, and Ambrose (2005) successfully obtained high resolution structural MRI data from stuttering and control children ages 8-13.
  3. Initial results indicate significant group differences in white and grey matter volume in brain areas involved in integrating sensory and motor aspects of speech.

Testing younger children closer to onset should advance our knowledge. Evidence is also accumulating that age at onset may bear a relation to genetic factors, in particular, it appears there may be a trend for persistent stuttering to have a slightly later onset than recovered stuttering (Yairi & Ambrose, 2005).

  • As the Illinois team continues to uncover possible interactions among different genetic loci (Cox, et al., 2005), the age factor should become more clear.
  • Age is also a risk factor in regard to children’s awareness of disfluent speech.
  • The belief that preschoolers who stutter lack in such awareness played a major role in theories and developmental models of the disorder.

For many years, clinicians’ assumption that awareness would trigger strong emotions (e.g., anxiety) in children was the main reason for shunning direct speech therapy for preschoolers. Whereas some three-year olds are either clearly, or appear to be, aware of stuttering, available experimental data show a very large increase in awareness between ages 4 and 5, including normally fluent children (Ambrose & Yairi, 1994; Ezrati, Platzky, & Yairi, 2001).

This information would seem to justify direct intervention techniques as well as provide clues for the timing of intervention and should be considered in counseling of parents and teachers about reactions of normally fluent children to their stuttering peers. Finally, important information about persistent stuttering may be uncovered by studying upper age groups – people who have stuttered for many years into advanced ages.

Perhaps they exhibit more pronounced characteristics that reveal differences not easily identifiable in the typical child or young adult who stutters. Indeed, our team’s members are currently pursuing structural brain imaging studies of aged people who stutter.

All of the above serve to highlight the role of age in the onset and development of stuttering, in subtype differentiation, and in treatment strategies. Knowledge is accumulating at a rapid pace but much remains to be learned. References Ambrose, N., & Yairi, E. (1994). The development of awareness of stuttering in preschool children.

Journal of Fluency Disorders, 19, 229-245. Chang, S., Erickson, K., & Ambrose, N. (2005). Regional white and grey matter volumetric growth differences in children with persistent versus recovered stuttering: An MRI (VBM) study. Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, 2005, Washington, D.C.

  • Program No.565.5.2005 Abstract Viewer/Itinerary Planner.
  • Online Cox, N., Roe, C., Suresh, R., Cook, E., Lundstrom, C., Garsten, M., Ezrati, R.
  • Ambrose, N., & Yairi, E. (2005).
  • Chromosomal signals for genes underlying stuttering.
  • Presented at the Oxford Disfluency Conference, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
You might be interested:  How To Reduce Skin Inflammation

Ezrati, R., Platzky, R., & Yairi, E. (2001). The young child’s awareness of stuttering-like disfluency. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 44, 368-380. Rommel, D., Hage, A., Kalehne, P., & Johannsen, H. (1999). Developmental, maintenance, and recovery of childhood stuttering: Prospective longitudinal data 3 years after first contact.

  • In K. Baker, L.
  • Rustin, & K.
  • Baker (Eds.), Proceedings of the fifth Oxford disfluency conference (pp.168-182).
  • Chappell Gardner, UK: Windsor, Berkshire.
  • Watkins, R., Yairi, E., & Ambrose, N.G. (1999).
  • Early childhood stuttering III: Initial status of expressive language abilities.
  • Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 42, 1125-1135.

Yairi, E. & Ambrose, N. (2005). Early childhood stuttering. Austin: Pro-Ed, Inc. : The Age Factor in Stuttering

Is it OK to stammer?

Is there any treatment for a stammer? – For most preschool children with a developmental stammer (stutter), the stammer goes away without any treatment. If it is needed, treatment is much more effective for preschool children than for older children and adults. Stammering that persists into school age tends to be harder to treat.

Is stammering a big problem?

What’s the outlook for this condition? – Stuttering isn’t a dangerous condition, and most people recover from it. Treatment — especially speech therapy — can speed up recovery. However, stuttering can seriously affect mental health. Nearly 40% of children between 12 and 17 who stutter also have conditions like anxiety or depression.

Why do I stammer while speaking?

Neurological changes – A disruption in the signals between the brain and speech nerves and muscles may cause stuttering. This may affect children and adults after a stroke or brain injury, The following may cause neurogenic stuttering:

stroke head trauma tumors degenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease meningitis

What vitamins help stuttering?

The Schwartz Study – Dr. Schwartz did a double-blind study Schwartz, M. Thiamin and Stuttering; a preliminary study. http://www.stuttering.com/research.html (accessed 2013 April 24) of 38 adult male stutterers. Half received about 350 milligrams of vitamin B-1 (three 100 mg pills, one with each meal, plus a daily B-complex pill).

The others received placebos. Of the 19 men who received the vitamins, stuttering was “largely eliminated” in six of the men. For the other 13 men no effect was seen. The six men were then followed for seven months and “their speech has remained essentially free of stuttering.” Adult men typically weigh about 190 pounds so these men received more than one milligram per pound of body weight, or more or less twice the dosage that was effective for the younger children in the Hale study.

The study was rejected by Nature because it didn’t follow formal procedures for registering human subjects and because a news release with the results had been released. The study wasn’t rejected for scientific reasons. Dr. Schwartz now recommends taking magnesium with thiamin.

  1. A studySchleier E, Schelhorn P, Groh F.
  2. 1991) Biochemical studies in stuttering in children.
  3. Otolaryngol Pol.1991;45(2):141-4.
  4. Tested minerals in the blood of 53 stuttering children aged 5-12, and a control group of 22 non-stuttering children aged 6-16.
  5. Sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium were tested.

The only significant difference was found in magnesium.47% of the stuttering children were low in magnesium. One of the functions of magnesium is in metabolizing B vitamins.

What vitamin deficiency causes stuttering?

It was also determined that as the severity of stuttering increased, the level of vitamin D decreased. These results suggest that vitamin D deficiency could have a negative effect on cognitive functions and language development.

What stops stuttering?

Treatment – After a comprehensive evaluation by a speech-language pathologist, a decision about the best treatment approach can be made. Several different approaches are available to treat children and adults who stutter. Because of varying individual issues and needs, a method — or combination of methods — that’s helpful for one person may not be as effective for another.

Improve speech fluency Develop effective communication Participate fully in school, work and social activities

A few examples of treatment approaches — in no particular order of effectiveness — include:

Speech therapy. Speech therapy can teach you to slow down your speech and learn to notice when you stutter. You may speak very slowly and deliberately when beginning speech therapy, but over time, you can work up to a more natural speech pattern. Electronic devices. Several electronic devices are available to enhance fluency. Delayed auditory feedback requires you to slow your speech or the speech will sound distorted through the machine. Another method mimics your speech so that it sounds as if you’re talking in unison with someone else. Some small electronic devices are worn during daily activities. Ask a speech-language pathologist for guidance on choosing a device. Cognitive behavioral therapy. This type of psychotherapy can help you learn to identify and change ways of thinking that might make stuttering worse. It can also help you resolve stress, anxiety or self-esteem problems related to stuttering. Parent-child interaction. Parental involvement in practicing techniques at home is a key part of helping a child cope with stuttering, especially with some methods. Follow the guidance of the speech-language pathologist to determine the best approach for your child.

Why do I stutter so much?

3. Stress-Related Stuttering – Serious stress caused by financial problems, loss of a relationship or other unexpected emotional changes can trigger a speech disorder. Things such as a car crash can also be a cause, but the speech disorder could be coming from the stress or an injury to the brain.

Can overthinking cause stuttering?

When overthinking occurs, sentences and word choices may become unclear and a significant stutter can be present. This in turn can result in increased feelings of embarrassment or shame.

Is stuttering caused by anxiety?

The Link Between Anxiety and Stuttering – For many people, verbal communication is an important way to connect with others. Stuttering makes this communication more difficult. This may trigger anxiety, especially abut social relationships. A 2009 study found stuttering increased the odds of being diagnosed with anxiety by six- to seven-fold and increased the likelihood of a diagnosis of social anxiety 16- to 34-fold.

Another 2009 study found that 50% of adults who stutter have social anxiety. Stuttering may change the way people relate to the person who stutters. Children who stutter sometimes experience bullying and isolation, Adults may struggle to feel heard at work or in high-pressure situations, such as speaking publicly at an academic conference.

Negative experiences with others can fuel a person’s anxiety about stuttering, and this anxiety may make stuttering worse. A person who stutters may also have false beliefs about stuttering, such as that stuttering necessarily means others won’t take them seriously or listen to them.

Why is there no cure for stuttering?

The honest truth is that there is no cure to stuttering. By its very nature, stuttering is cyclical – meaning it can (and probably will) come and go. You can learn tricks that might even make it go away for a time, but these tricks take a lot of mental effort.

Does stammering reduce with age?

What Is Stuttering? – Many young kids go through a stage between the ages of 2 and 5 when they stutter. This might make them:

repeat certain syllables, words, or phrases prolong them stop, making no sound for certain sounds and syllables

Stuttering is a form of dysfluency (dis-FLOO-en-see), an interruption in the flow of speech. In many cases, stuttering goes away on its own by age 5. In some kids, it goes on for longer. Effective treatments are available to help a child overcome it.

You might be interested:  Yoga Period Pain

Does stuttering get worse with age?

The Age Factor in Stuttering Ehud Yairi, Ph.D.University of Illinois Age is among the strongest risk factors for stuttering with several important implications. Although the disorder begins within a wide age-range, current robust evidence indicates that, for a very large proportion of cases, it erupts during the preschool period.

  • Data obtained at the University of Illinois Stuttering Research Program revealed that for 65% of the child participants, stuttering onset occurred prior to age 3; the figure rose to 85% by 3 1/2 years of age (Yairi & Ambrose, 2005).
  • Leaving room for some sampling errors, children past age 4 face a relatively low risk for stuttering.

From clinical considerations, these statistics call for greater emphasis on preparing clinicians for working with early childhood stuttering. Age brings out other factors. The fact that the critical age for stuttering onset parallels the age span when significant rapid developments occur in the anatomy of the speech system, as well as in complex language and articulatory skills, invites speculations that interferences in these maturational processes contribute to stuttering; hence the possibility of relations among stuttering, language, and articulation.

  • Although our own data (Watkins, Yairi, & Ambrose, 1999), and those of our colleagues from Germany (Rommel et.
  • Al., 1999), show that the language skills of children who stutter, as a group, meet or exceed norms, we suspect that there are differences in the ways in which they process language.
  • One research priority consequent to information about age at onset is experimental manipulation of similarities and/or differences in language processing and production between children who stutter near the onset of the disorder and normally fluent children, particularly in terms of the nature of linguistic knowledge and the time course of knowledge activation.

Varied responses to semantic and phonological distracters, slower reaction time, and/or alternative activation paths may reveal differences in language processing. One of the intriguing questions is: does age at stuttering onset “prior to, or after, a certain point in language development” underlie distinct subtypes of the disorder? Currently, scientists in several laboratories are pursuing such issues.

Brain imaging studies of children should also enhance understanding of this issue. Our team members, Chang, Erickson, and Ambrose (2005) successfully obtained high resolution structural MRI data from stuttering and control children ages 8-13. Initial results indicate significant group differences in white and grey matter volume in brain areas involved in integrating sensory and motor aspects of speech.

Testing younger children closer to onset should advance our knowledge. Evidence is also accumulating that age at onset may bear a relation to genetic factors, in particular, it appears there may be a trend for persistent stuttering to have a slightly later onset than recovered stuttering (Yairi & Ambrose, 2005).

  1. As the Illinois team continues to uncover possible interactions among different genetic loci (Cox, et al., 2005), the age factor should become more clear.
  2. Age is also a risk factor in regard to children’s awareness of disfluent speech.
  3. The belief that preschoolers who stutter lack in such awareness played a major role in theories and developmental models of the disorder.

For many years, clinicians’ assumption that awareness would trigger strong emotions (e.g., anxiety) in children was the main reason for shunning direct speech therapy for preschoolers. Whereas some three-year olds are either clearly, or appear to be, aware of stuttering, available experimental data show a very large increase in awareness between ages 4 and 5, including normally fluent children (Ambrose & Yairi, 1994; Ezrati, Platzky, & Yairi, 2001).

This information would seem to justify direct intervention techniques as well as provide clues for the timing of intervention and should be considered in counseling of parents and teachers about reactions of normally fluent children to their stuttering peers. Finally, important information about persistent stuttering may be uncovered by studying upper age groups – people who have stuttered for many years into advanced ages.

Perhaps they exhibit more pronounced characteristics that reveal differences not easily identifiable in the typical child or young adult who stutters. Indeed, our team’s members are currently pursuing structural brain imaging studies of aged people who stutter.

  • All of the above serve to highlight the role of age in the onset and development of stuttering, in subtype differentiation, and in treatment strategies.
  • Nowledge is accumulating at a rapid pace but much remains to be learned.
  • References Ambrose, N., & Yairi, E. (1994).
  • The development of awareness of stuttering in preschool children.

Journal of Fluency Disorders, 19, 229-245. Chang, S., Erickson, K., & Ambrose, N. (2005). Regional white and grey matter volumetric growth differences in children with persistent versus recovered stuttering: An MRI (VBM) study. Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, 2005, Washington, D.C.

  • Program No.565.5.2005 Abstract Viewer/Itinerary Planner.
  • Online Cox, N., Roe, C., Suresh, R., Cook, E., Lundstrom, C., Garsten, M., Ezrati, R.
  • Ambrose, N., & Yairi, E. (2005).
  • Chromosomal signals for genes underlying stuttering.
  • Presented at the Oxford Disfluency Conference, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Ezrati, R., Platzky, R., & Yairi, E. (2001). The young child’s awareness of stuttering-like disfluency. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 44, 368-380. Rommel, D., Hage, A., Kalehne, P., & Johannsen, H. (1999). Developmental, maintenance, and recovery of childhood stuttering: Prospective longitudinal data 3 years after first contact.

In K. Baker, L. Rustin, & K. Baker (Eds.), Proceedings of the fifth Oxford disfluency conference (pp.168-182). Chappell Gardner, UK: Windsor, Berkshire. Watkins, R., Yairi, E., & Ambrose, N.G. (1999). Early childhood stuttering III: Initial status of expressive language abilities. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 42, 1125-1135.

Yairi, E. & Ambrose, N. (2005). Early childhood stuttering. Austin: Pro-Ed, Inc. : The Age Factor in Stuttering

Can stuttering be cured by surgery?

Can Stuttering be Cured by Surgery? – Stuttering can be frustrating to many, and surgery to cure this ailment would be an ideal choice for them. There are several options to choose from to fight stuttering speech, such as speech therapy and the use of a stuttering device.

But, a question that most people seek an answer to is whether surgery can cure stuttering. There are three types of stuttering, namely – developmental stuttering, which is common in children in their developmental stages; neurogenic stuttering, which occurs due to signal problems from the brain to the nerves and muscles; and psychogenic stuttering, which is believed to be caused when the area of the brain that directs thought and reasoning is affected.

Surgery for stuttering was performed for the first time in the early 1840s, which was believed to be a success. The tonsils and the uvula were removed, and the procedure claimed to have cured nearly forty stutterers. It was later found that there was an error made and that the surgery had failed to cure stammering.

  1. There was no visible improvement in the patients at all.
  2. Stuttering is a concern that many individuals face.
  3. The underlying cause of developmental stuttering is still unknown, and abnormalities in speech motor control may also cause stuttering.
  4. Additionally, genetics can also result in this disorder, as it is believed that this speech disorder can be inherited.

Many neurosurgeons are determined to find a surgical cure for this disorder, but for now, surgery is not a cure.

Does reading help with stuttering?

Talking and sharing can be incredibly challenging for anyone who stutters. It may feel like waging a war with oneself at all times. If you have a family member or dear friend who stutters, you may want to introduce them to books that talk about speech disfluency in a way that’s uplifting and informative.