How To Cure Asthma Forever By Yoga

0 Comments

How To Cure Asthma Forever By Yoga

Is it possible to cure asthma permanently?

No, asthma cannot be cured. Some children with asthma will outgrow it by adulthood. But, for many, asthma is a lifelong condition. It is possible to live a healthy life despite asthma.

How can I stop getting asthma forever?

3. Adjust treatment according to your asthma action plan – When your lungs aren’t working as well as they should be, you may need to adjust your medications according to the plan you made with your doctor ahead of time. Your written asthma action plan will let you know exactly when and how to make adjustments.

Levels of asthma control in children older than 12 and adults

Well-controlled GREEN ZONE Poorly controlled YELLOW ZONE Very poorly controlled RED ZONE
Symptoms such as coughing, wheezing or shortness of breath Two days a week or fewer More than two days a week Daily and throughout the night
Nighttime awakenings Two times a month or fewer One to three times a week Four times a week or more
Effect on daily activities None Some limits Extremely limiting
Quick-relief inhaler use to control symptoms Two days a week or fewer More than two days a week Several times a day
Lung test readings More than 80% of your predicted personal best 60 to 80% of your predicted personal best Less than 60% of your predicted personal best

There are two main types of medications used to treat asthma:

  • Long-term control medications such as inhaled corticosteroids are the most important medications used to keep asthma under control. These preventive medications treat the airway inflammation that leads to asthma symptoms. Used on a daily basis, these medications can reduce or eliminate asthma flare-ups.
  • Quick-relief inhalers contain a fast-acting medication such as albuterol. These medications are sometimes called rescue inhalers. They’re used as needed to quickly open your airways and make breathing easier. Knowing when to use these medications can help prevent an impending asthma attack.

Long-term control medications are the key to keeping your asthma controlled and in the green zone. If you frequently use a quick-relief inhaler to treat symptoms, your asthma isn’t under control. See your doctor about making treatment changes. Make sure you know how to use your asthma medications properly. They will only keep your asthma under control if you use them correctly.

What can I drink to stop asthma?

– Certain herbal teas may help relieve asthma symptoms. Research suggests that ginger tea, green tea, black tea, eucalyptus tea, fennel tea, and licorice tea may reduce inflammation, relax your respiratory muscles, and boost your breathing, among other benefits. Keep in mind that these teas should be used in tandem with your current asthma medications and shouldn’t be seen as a replacement.

What type of yoga is best for asthma?

The forward bend and other basic yoga poses can help you learn to stay calm and control your breath, possibly reducing the severity of an asthma attack. – Yoga can help increase breath and body awareness, slow your respiratory rate, and promote calm and relieve stress — all of which are beneficial for people who have asthma, says Judi Bar, certified yoga therapist and yoga program manager at Cleveland Clinic Wellness.

  1. While there currently isn’t research that says yoga can definitively control asthma symptoms, studies have shown that yoga can help people with asthma control breathing and reduce stress, which is a common asthma trigger.
  2. A review of 15 studies published in April 2016 in the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews looked at the effect of yoga in patients with asthma, finding that yoga “probably leads to small improvements in quality of life and symptoms in people with asthma.” “There can be outside forces, such as allergens and toxins, that may trigger an asthma attack,” says Bar.

“While we can’t always necessarily avoid some triggers, we can use yoga to try to generally stay calm and have breath and body awareness, and that may be able to at least take a layer off the severity of the attack, if not help prevent it.” Doing yoga routinely can have a cumulative effect, says Bar.

  1. If you begin to feel an asthma attack coming on, you can use breath awareness, says Bar, to slow down and remain calm.
  2. During an asthma attack, Bar adds, we use any muscles we can to try to breathe, and as a result, our muscles get very tight; stretching the shoulders, back, side, and breathing muscles routinely is great conditioning for getting those muscles in the habit of relaxing in the event of an asthma attack.

“You can do a relaxation pose every day and do one or two of the body stretches daily,” says Bar. “It won’t take very long.” And best of all, there are secondary benefits of yoga, such as a feeling of peace, increased mobility, better flexibility, and improved balance, says Bar.

  1. Simply put, yoga may help provide some asthma relief, and can lead to a host of other health benefits.
  2. The key, says Bar, is to find a practice that’s accessible for you and doesn’t cause you anxiety — start slow, and be careful not to push yourself to do anything that is uncomfortable or could lead to strain or injury.

Here are some great yoga poses to try for asthma relief: RELATED: How Yoga Benefits Your Health and Well-Being Tamal Dodge, a yoga instructor in Los Angeles and star of the DVD Element: Hatha & Flow Yoga for Beginners, recommends the savasana pose for asthma relief because of the breath and stress management it provides. How to Do It Lie on your back with your arms at your sides and your feet and palms dropped open. Just like savasana, say Dodge, sukasana is another relaxing pose and its focus on breath and stress control makes it a great exercise to help asthma. How to Do It Start seated, with your legs crossed. If you feel some discomfort in your hips or lower back, roll up a towel and place it under your sit bones for extra support.

Take your right hand and place it on your heart, place the left hand on your belly, and close your eyes. Draw in the stomach and lift the chest for good posture, Let out your breath slowly and hold the pose for five minutes, with slow, even breathing. Modification Sit straight on a chair if you are not able to sit comfortably on the floor, says Bar.

Keep your back against the back of the chair for a seated mountain pose. Start with your arms relaxed at your sides and then reach with your arms over your head and interlace the fingers and hold for 30 seconds to one minute while breathing slowly; lower your arms then repeat several times. Dodge says this bending pose can open up the chest, to possibly ease breathing. This pose stretches the back muscles, helps you breathe more deeply, and is calming, says Bar. How to Do It Stand with your legs hip-width apart, fold your body forward, and put a little bend in the knees to relieve any strain in the lower back. This pose promotes calm and targets your torso, back, and respiratory muscles — the diaphragm, the intercostal muscles, as well as your abdominal and neck muscles. How to Do It While seated on the floor or forward on the seat of a chair, place your right hand on the floor or seat of the chair.

  1. Then slowly bring your left hand to the outside of your right knee and lengthen your spine, gently twisting your torso as you move.
  2. Gently look over your right shoulder.
  3. Breathe in and out slowly, inhaling as you picture your spine lengthening and relaxing.
  4. Hold for a breath or two and return to center.

Repeat on the other side. Modification This pose can also be done while lying on your back on the floor. On your mat, bring your knees up to your chest. Let your knees fall slowly toward the floor to your right as you gently turn your upper body to the left. This pose “opens up” the side of your body and lungs, says Bar. How to Do It Stand with your feet about hip-width apart. Gently pull in your belly for support but make sure it’s relaxed enough so that your diaphragm does the work as you breathe. Put your right hand on your right hip, turn your left palm out, and lift your left arm over your head as you bend slowly to the right. With this pose, you stretch your chest and neck muscles. How to Do It Lie on your front on your mat with your feet pointed behind you and place your hands on either side, palms down on the floor, right beneath your shoulders. As you begin to lift up, slide your elbows under your shoulders and reach your fingers forward; press your shoulders down as you hold in sphinx pose.

  1. If you wish to go further, slowly straighten your arms as you lift your chest up further off the floor.
  2. Breathe in and out as you gaze in front of you, keeping your chin parallel to the ground with a long spine.
  3. Modification Sit on a chair and with your feet flat on the floor, reach behind you and grab the back of the chair with your hands.

Lean forward as much as you feel comfortable while pulling your shoulders back and straightening your elbows. Breathe in and out as you hold the pose and visualize taking your weight off your chest so that your lungs can breathe and move easily. If this doesn’t feel comfortable, you can modify the pose further by standing and looking up slightly as you inhale and exhale several times, stretching the front of your neck.

Can asthma go away with exercise?

Can Exercise Help Asthma? – Exercise benefits your entire body. Exercise cannot cure asthma, but some of its health benefits can help you keep your asthma well-controlled. Some health benefits of exercise that can help your asthma include:

Improved lung functionWeight loss/maintenance – Weight can affect lung volume, blood flow to the airways, and how you respond to medicineStress reduction – Stress and emotions can trigger asthma symptoms

Medical Review : June 2022 by John James, MD

Can I live long with asthma?

With treatment, most people with asthma can live normal lives. There are also some simple ways you can help keep your symptoms under control.

Does asthma go away with age?

No. Asthma is a lifelong disease. Some children may have fewer symptoms in their teens but they still have asthma. The pattern of wheezing seen in young children can make this issue confusing. About two-thirds of children (age six and younger) who wheeze when they have a cold do not have wheezing after age six.

Many of these children may be initially diagnosed with asthma. This does not mean they “outgrew” their asthma-it usually means that they probably didn’t have asthma in the first place. If your child has symptoms (including wheezing, coughing, tightness in the chest or shortness of breath), it is important to talk with your child’s doctor.

If your child has asthma, your doctor will help you develop a treatment plan so your child can lead a healthy, active life. Learn more about managing asthma triggers, or visit NoAttacks.org,

What fruit is good for asthma?

Pomegranates are high in antioxidants, which may help quell the inflammation linked to asthma. – While there’s no magic-bullet food to cure asthma, making some changes in your diet may help reduce or control asthma symptoms, In general, a healthy, varied diet plan is beneficial with asthma, says Holly Prehn, RD, a certified nutrition support clinician at the University of Colorado Hospital in Denver.

According to a review about the role of food in asthma management published in Nutrients, there is suggestion that a traditional Western diet — which is high in refined grains, red meat, processed meat, and sweets — can increase inflammation and worsen asthma symptoms, while a diet filled with more fruits and vegetables can positively impact both asthma risk and control.

“Diets rich in fruits and vegetables, as well as monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (particularly omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid ), and lower in added sugars and processed and red meats tend to be better for asthma management,” says Kelly Jones, RD, CSSD, owner of Kelly Jones Nutrition based in Newtown, Pennsylvania.

  • The Mediterranean diet, one based on eating plenty of healthy fats (like olive oil), fish, whole grains, and fruit, fits the bill, she says.
  • And there is some preliminary evidence to suggest that following this diet may indeed be linked to lower rates of asthma, according to one study,
  • It’s worth noting that certain foods may also worsen your symptoms.

Elizabeth Secord, MD, a pediatrician with a specialty in allergy and immunology at Children’s Hospital of Michigan in Detroit, recommends keeping a food log to better understand the link between your diet and your symptoms. For example, you might notice that spicy foods trigger reflux symptoms similar to asthma symptoms.

  1. RELATED: Your Everyday Guide to Living Well With Asthma Finally, when talking about diet and asthma, being overweight or obese should be part of the conversation, Dr.
  2. Secord says.
  3. Some data, for instance, suggests people who are obese may not respond as well to standard dosing for asthma treatment, according to a review,

Other research has linked obesity to worse asthma outcomes, perhaps because the inflammation caused by obesity contributes to airway restriction. Preliminary evidence suggests that, for people with asthma who are overweight or obese, losing weight might help lessen asthma symptoms.

Research has found moderately and severely obese adults with uncontrolled asthma who lost 10 percent or more of their body weight saw significant improvements in asthma control. And remember, while dietary changes can help you manage asthma symptoms and may lessen the severity of symptoms you have, no diet should substitute for medications or other treatment your doctor has prescribed to help manage your asthma.

Dietary changes alone cannot cure or reverse asthma. So what should you eat? Read on for eight specific foods to include in an asthma-friendly diet. If you’re looking to alleviate asthma symptoms, start by adding more fruit to your diet, Prehn says. Fruit is a good source of beta carotene and vitamins C and E, which can reduce inflammation and swelling in the lungs, according to Mayo Clinic, The Nutrients review noted the reason that fruit has this effect isn’t known, but it seems apples and citrus fruits (including oranges) specifically have been shown to decrease asthma risk and symptoms.

Can you heal lungs with exercise?

Find the right activity for you Exercise enhances your mood and shape, but did you know it can help improve your breathing? Regular physical activity helps your body make use of the oxygen you breathe, often called your lung function. People with lung disease, such as COPD, tend to use more energy to breathe compared to others.

By exercising regularly, they can decrease their symptoms and improve their breathing. Get moving Even though lung disease can limit the amount of air you take in, you can improve how well your body uses the air. When you exercise, your lungs and heart are hard at work. Together, they bring oxygen into the body and deliver it to the muscles being used.

This improves circulation and strengthens the tissue around your lungs, helping them function. Spending 30 minutes a day, five days a week doing some endurance or aerobic activities is great for improving lung function and health. For instance, you could try:

Brisk walking or jogging Yard work (mowing, raking, digging) Dancing Swimming Biking Climbing stairs

Team up with your doctor Before starting any exercise routine, make an appointment to talk with your health care provider. Ask about what workouts you should try, as well as how often you should do them. If you have a registered account on My HealtheVet try recording your exercises in the physical activity journal,

Unusual or increasing shortness of breath Chest pain or discomfort Burning, tightness, heaviness, or pressure in your chest Unusual aching in your arms, shoulder, neck, jaw, or back A racing or skipping heartbeat Feeling much more tired than usual Lightheadedness, dizziness, or nausea Unusual joint pain

Please vote in our unscientific poll. All responses are anonymous.

Is Egg good for asthma?

There’s no asthma diet that will eliminate your symptoms. But these steps may help:

  • Eat to maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight can worsen asthma. Even losing a little weight can improve your symptoms. Learn how to eat right to maintain a healthy weight over the long term.
  • Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. They’re a good source of antioxidants such as beta carotene and vitamins C and E, which may help reduce lung swelling and irritation (inflammation) caused by cell-damaging chemicals known as free radicals.
  • Avoid allergy-triggering foods. Allergic food reactions can cause asthma symptoms. In some people, exercising after eating an allergy-causing food leads to asthma symptoms.
  • Take in vitamin D. People with more-severe asthma may have low vitamin D levels. Milk, eggs and fish such as salmon all contain vitamin D. Even spending a few minutes outdoors in the sun can increase vitamin D levels.
  • Avoid sulfites. Sulfites can trigger asthma symptoms in some people. Used as a preservative, sulfites can be found in wine, dried fruits, pickles, fresh and frozen shrimp, and some other foods.

It’s also possible that eating less salt (sodium) or eating foods rich in oils found in cold-water fish and some nuts and seeds (omega-3 fatty acids) may reduce asthma symptoms. But more research is needed to verify this. Making informed choices about what foods to eat and what foods to avoid won’t cure asthma.

Is Lemon bad for asthma?

How Does Lemon Work for Asthma? –

Lemon is a rich source of vitamin C, which helps in suppressing the secretion of inflammatory particles that lead to inflammation and swelling of airways, resulting in an attack of asthma. Lemon makes the bronchioles less sensitive to histamine. Histamine is responsible for constriction of bronchioles when they become exposed to environmental allergens. It helps in strengthening the immunity of the body, which prevents attacks of asthma caused by exposure to pollen, animal dander, smoke, viruses and dust mite. The antibacterial and antiseptic properties found in juice of lemon help in fighting viruses and bacteria, which trigger attacks of asthma and infections of lung. The citric acid present in fresh juice of lemon carries nutrients that are important for maintaining body’s energy. It strengthens and cleanses the lungs, thereby making the breathing of asthma sufferers easy. Lemons also have antioxidant properties which help in combating allergens that enter the lungs and preventing them from causing an attack of asthma.

Can yoga cure mild asthma?

The forward bend and other basic yoga poses can help you learn to stay calm and control your breath, possibly reducing the severity of an asthma attack. – Yoga can help increase breath and body awareness, slow your respiratory rate, and promote calm and relieve stress — all of which are beneficial for people who have asthma, says Judi Bar, certified yoga therapist and yoga program manager at Cleveland Clinic Wellness.

  1. While there currently isn’t research that says yoga can definitively control asthma symptoms, studies have shown that yoga can help people with asthma control breathing and reduce stress, which is a common asthma trigger.
  2. A review of 15 studies published in April 2016 in the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews looked at the effect of yoga in patients with asthma, finding that yoga “probably leads to small improvements in quality of life and symptoms in people with asthma.” “There can be outside forces, such as allergens and toxins, that may trigger an asthma attack,” says Bar.

“While we can’t always necessarily avoid some triggers, we can use yoga to try to generally stay calm and have breath and body awareness, and that may be able to at least take a layer off the severity of the attack, if not help prevent it.” Doing yoga routinely can have a cumulative effect, says Bar.

If you begin to feel an asthma attack coming on, you can use breath awareness, says Bar, to slow down and remain calm. During an asthma attack, Bar adds, we use any muscles we can to try to breathe, and as a result, our muscles get very tight; stretching the shoulders, back, side, and breathing muscles routinely is great conditioning for getting those muscles in the habit of relaxing in the event of an asthma attack.

“You can do a relaxation pose every day and do one or two of the body stretches daily,” says Bar. “It won’t take very long.” And best of all, there are secondary benefits of yoga, such as a feeling of peace, increased mobility, better flexibility, and improved balance, says Bar.

  • Simply put, yoga may help provide some asthma relief, and can lead to a host of other health benefits.
  • The key, says Bar, is to find a practice that’s accessible for you and doesn’t cause you anxiety — start slow, and be careful not to push yourself to do anything that is uncomfortable or could lead to strain or injury.

Here are some great yoga poses to try for asthma relief: RELATED: How Yoga Benefits Your Health and Well-Being Tamal Dodge, a yoga instructor in Los Angeles and star of the DVD Element: Hatha & Flow Yoga for Beginners, recommends the savasana pose for asthma relief because of the breath and stress management it provides. How to Do It Lie on your back with your arms at your sides and your feet and palms dropped open. Just like savasana, say Dodge, sukasana is another relaxing pose and its focus on breath and stress control makes it a great exercise to help asthma. How to Do It Start seated, with your legs crossed. If you feel some discomfort in your hips or lower back, roll up a towel and place it under your sit bones for extra support.

Take your right hand and place it on your heart, place the left hand on your belly, and close your eyes. Draw in the stomach and lift the chest for good posture, Let out your breath slowly and hold the pose for five minutes, with slow, even breathing. Modification Sit straight on a chair if you are not able to sit comfortably on the floor, says Bar.

Keep your back against the back of the chair for a seated mountain pose. Start with your arms relaxed at your sides and then reach with your arms over your head and interlace the fingers and hold for 30 seconds to one minute while breathing slowly; lower your arms then repeat several times. Dodge says this bending pose can open up the chest, to possibly ease breathing. This pose stretches the back muscles, helps you breathe more deeply, and is calming, says Bar. How to Do It Stand with your legs hip-width apart, fold your body forward, and put a little bend in the knees to relieve any strain in the lower back. This pose promotes calm and targets your torso, back, and respiratory muscles — the diaphragm, the intercostal muscles, as well as your abdominal and neck muscles. How to Do It While seated on the floor or forward on the seat of a chair, place your right hand on the floor or seat of the chair.

Then slowly bring your left hand to the outside of your right knee and lengthen your spine, gently twisting your torso as you move. Gently look over your right shoulder. Breathe in and out slowly, inhaling as you picture your spine lengthening and relaxing. Hold for a breath or two and return to center.

Repeat on the other side. Modification This pose can also be done while lying on your back on the floor. On your mat, bring your knees up to your chest. Let your knees fall slowly toward the floor to your right as you gently turn your upper body to the left. This pose “opens up” the side of your body and lungs, says Bar. How to Do It Stand with your feet about hip-width apart. Gently pull in your belly for support but make sure it’s relaxed enough so that your diaphragm does the work as you breathe. Put your right hand on your right hip, turn your left palm out, and lift your left arm over your head as you bend slowly to the right. With this pose, you stretch your chest and neck muscles. How to Do It Lie on your front on your mat with your feet pointed behind you and place your hands on either side, palms down on the floor, right beneath your shoulders. As you begin to lift up, slide your elbows under your shoulders and reach your fingers forward; press your shoulders down as you hold in sphinx pose.

If you wish to go further, slowly straighten your arms as you lift your chest up further off the floor. Breathe in and out as you gaze in front of you, keeping your chin parallel to the ground with a long spine. Modification Sit on a chair and with your feet flat on the floor, reach behind you and grab the back of the chair with your hands.

Lean forward as much as you feel comfortable while pulling your shoulders back and straightening your elbows. Breathe in and out as you hold the pose and visualize taking your weight off your chest so that your lungs can breathe and move easily. If this doesn’t feel comfortable, you can modify the pose further by standing and looking up slightly as you inhale and exhale several times, stretching the front of your neck.

Can lungs repair themselves from asthma?

Preventing Permanent Damage From Asthma Asthma can cause permanent damage to your lungs if not treated early and well. Here’s why – and what you can do. Medically Reviewed by on November 05, 2005 Is your asthma under control? If you’re like most people, you probably think it is.

You feel OK most of the time, so you usually don’t need medicine. When your flares up, a puff from your trusty emergency inhaler solves the problem – most of the time, at least. But experts say that if you have persistent and you’re only treating it during attacks, you’re not controlling it at all. Anyone who has more than twice a week during the daytime, or more than two nights a month, should talk to their doctors about preventive treatment.

“A lot of people have this attitude that they don’t need to worry about their asthma unless they’re having an attack,” says Timothy Craig, DO, professor of medicine and pediatrics at Penn State University. “The rest of the time, they ignore it.” Asthma is a chronic, incurable disease.

  1. Even when you feel well, your asthma hasn’t gone away.
  2. Even if you can’t feel it, your airways might still be inflamed.
  3. Treating persistent asthma with only occasional puffs from a rescue inhaler is like dealing with a leaky pipe in your basement by mopping up the water on the floor.
  4. You’re only thinking about the symptom and not treating the underlying cause.

Over time, if asthma isn’t well controlled it can damage your airways permanently. Yet while damage to the airways may be irreversible, it is not inevitable. The good news is that there is a lot you can do to prevent serious damage from ever developing.

“When asthma gets correctly diagnosed and treated, most people do very well with the conventional we have available,” says allergist Jonathan A. Bernstein, MD, associate professor of clinical medicine at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. There may not be a, but by sticking to the right treatment – avoiding triggers and taking your medicine – you can regain control and live a full and normal life.

Asthma is a complicated disease, and doctors don’t completely understand its causes. But it has two main components: inflammation and muscle constriction. Asthma affects the airways, the bronchial tubes that carry air into the, In people with asthma, the lining of these airways becomes inflamed.

No one is sure why this first develops. But certain allergy triggers (like or pet dander) or irritants (like perfumes or cigarette smoke) begin to trigger this swelling. If you take long-term control medicines – like inhaled corticosteroids – you can reduce this swelling and keep the airways healthy. But if your asthma goes untreated, problems develop.

Over time, this constant inflammation can destroy the surface layer of the airways, says Hugh H. Windom, MD, associate clinical professor of immunology at the University of South Florida. “The surface layer acts as a kind of filter,” Windom says. “But once it’s gone, all of the pollutants and allergens have direct access into the lungs.” So asthma can cause damage to the airways that, in turn, makes the asthma worse.

Asthma also affects the muscles that surround the airways. During an attack, these muscles tighten and further restrict the amount of air getting into the lungs. Eventually, the constant inflammation and muscle constriction can have irreversible effects. Norman Edelman, MD, a lung specialist and chief medical officer for the American Lung Association, compares it to arthritis.

” causes swelling,” he tells WebMD. “If you don’t treat it, that swelling can permanently deform the joints. Asthma works the same way.” Untreated asthma can permanently change the shape of the airways. The tissue of the bronchial tubes becomes thickened and scarred.

The muscles are permanently enlarged. And a person may wind up with reduced lung function that can never be healed. Asthma is known for its obvious and noisy symptoms: wheezing, gasping, and, But experts say that the typical impression of asthma is not always correct. “Asthma can sometimes be a silent disease,” says Bernstein.

“People can walk around with very serious asthma, with significant blockages of their airways, and not show any symptoms.” Windom agrees. “The severity of really may not reflect the severity of the underlying disease,” he says. Even if you feel fine, your asthma may still be damaging your airways – and you may be closer to a serious attack than you realize.

Even if you do have symptoms, you may not have an accurate impression of how much they affect you. “There’s no question that people with asthma tend to think they have much better control over their condition than they actually do,” Edelman tells WebMD. In a 2005 poll of over 4,500 adults with asthma in the U.S.

sponsored by the Asthma and Foundation, 88% said that their condition was “under control.” But experts question their optimistic judgment. About 48% said that their symptoms disturbed their sleep. And 50% said that asthma has made them give up in the middle of a workout.

  1. Those are severe symptoms for people who supposedly have their condition “under control.” While many adults have trouble assessing their own asthma, it’s a special problem for children.
  2. They may not remember life without symptoms.
  3. It’s very easy for symptoms to be missed in kids,” says Windom.
  4. I see kids who don’t like sports because they can’t compete and get short of breath.

But their parents don’t realize what’s going on. They assume that their children are just lazy couch potatoes, or that they just prefer computers to playing outside.” Craig agrees. “Many kids who have always had asthma don’t know any better,” he tells WebMD.

  • They think that this is just how things are supposed to be.
  • They don’t complain, so no one around them knows about their symptoms.” Doctors used to have a more relaxed attitude to, but experts now agree that it’s crucial to get treatment as soon as possible.
  • I think just about anyone who treats asthma will tell you that aggressive treatment is the way to go,” says Edelman.

“It really works.” There are two basic types of medicines. Quick-relief medications, usually in the form of inhalers, swiftly reduce the muscle tightness around the airways, allowing you to breathe easier. You would use a quick-relief medicine during an,

Long-term control medicines either calm inflammation or help prevent the airways from closing. They are used daily – not just when you have an asthma attack – because they work slowly. They prevent rather than treat symptoms, so they’re not much help once you are already having an attack. Inhaled long-term control medicines are usually preferred, but some long-term medicines are also available as pills.

The other important treatment hinges on your own behavior: You need to stay away from the allergens or irritants that trigger your asthma. By following this treatment approach, the majority of people with asthma can control their symptoms. They can live normal, healthy lives.

  1. If asthma is so treatable, why do 5,000 people in the U.S.
  2. Die from it every year? Why are 70,000 people hospitalized for asthma every year? The simple answer is that while good asthma treatments are available, many people aren’t using them.
  3. Not taking your medicine can have serious consequences.
  4. We think that poor or irregular asthma treatment puts people at greater risk of more serious or irreversible damage,” says Windom.

Part of the fault lies with doctors, Windom tells WebMD. He says that many doctors don’t monitor their asthma patients well enough. Too often, he says, they treat the condition based only on the patient’s impression of their health, which is often incorrect.

He believes that doctors should pay more attention to objective analyses, like breathing tests with meters. “Going by a patient’s impression – instead of getting objective measures – would never be accepted for treating other chronic conditions, like diabetes,” Windom says. But a large part of the problem is that people with asthma are not following their doctor’s recommendations.

Many only treat the flare-ups of asthma and don’t think of it as a chronic disease. “We have data that shows that people tend to use their long-term asthma treatment for two to three months at a time,” says Windom. “But by then they feel better, and they never get the prescription refilled.

The pharmacy records show it.” In fact, one survey conducted by the CDC in 2001 found that less than half of people with asthma said that they had a routine check-up with a doctor in the previous year. Craig says that some patients go through a regular cycle. “It’s very common for people to have a scare, like a trip to the ER, and then become diligent with their asthma treatment for a few months,” he tells WebMD.

“But then their diligence wanes and they stop taking their medication.” Gradually, their condition gets worse until they have a crisis. Then the cycle repeats. If you’re suffering from asthma now, understand that you can feel better. Doctors have treatments that will help.

  1. Of course, many things can get in the way of good treatment.
  2. One of them is the price.
  3. Experts agree that the costs of many have become very high in recent years.
  4. According to the 2005 Health Costs Survey sponsored by the Kaiser Family Foundation, the Harvard School of Public Health, and USA Today, 43% of all people with asthma said that, in the past year, they could not afford their treatment.

If the price is a problem for you, talk honestly with your doctor. See if you can get some free samples. Ask about assistance programs offered by pharmaceutical companies or by your state. Whatever you do, don’t put off getting treatment. Delaying might make your asthma worse.

  1. If you put off treatment with too long, you could wind up with irreversible,” says Craig.
  2. So you need to take charge of your health care and fight for the best treatment you can get.
  3. Don’t settle for a life restricted by symptoms.
  4. Don’t settle for treatment that isn’t helping.
  5. Demand that you get aggressive treatment of your asthma,” says Edelman.

“There is no reason for you to be suffering. You have the right to feel well.” © 2005 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. : Preventing Permanent Damage From Asthma