How To Treat Cut On Tongue

0 Comments

How To Treat Cut On Tongue
How can I relieve pain from a mouth or tongue cut? – You can rinse your mouth with warm salt water to relieve pain and reduce the chance of infection. To make a saltwater rinse, dissolve half a teaspoon of salt in a cup of lukewarm water. You can also apply an ice pack or cold compress to reduce swelling and relieve pain. Simple pain relievers such as paracetamol can also be helpful.

How long does a cut on tongue take to heal?

Tongue biting usually happens accidentally and can cause pain, soreness, and bleeding. Tongue-biting injuries are common and often minor, especially in children. They’re usually more severe in adults. You may bite your tongue:

  • while eating
  • after dental anesthesia
  • during sleep
  • due to stress
  • during a seizure
  • in the course of a traumatic event, such as a bike or car accident or during a fall
  • while playing sports

Healing time for a tongue bite depends on the severity of the injury. Less severe tongue injuries heal on their own within a week. More severe tongue injuries require medical attention, such as stitches and medication. It may take several weeks or months to fully heal.

  • bleeds excessively
  • bleeds for a second time after the original bleeding has stopped
  • appears red or swollen
  • feels warm
  • has red streaks or pus
  • is very painful
  • is accompanied by a fever
  • is visibly deformed

When you bite your tongue, it’s also possible to bite your lips or the inside of your mouth. Treatment for these areas of the mouth is similar to treatment for the tongue. If the tongue bite is minor, you can treat it at home. Follow these steps to minimize pain and ensure the injury heals properly:

  1. Wash your hands with soap and water, or wear latex gloves.
  2. Rinse your mouth with water so you can better see the injury.
  3. Apply gauze or cloth with pressure to the site of the injury to stop the bleeding.
  4. Place ice or a cold pack wrapped in a thin cloth to the outside of the lips or mouth if there’s any swelling.
  5. Call a doctor if bleeding doesn’t stop or if you notice a visible deformity, signs of infection, or new bleeding.

If the injury is severe, be sure to follow a doctor’s instructions in addition to the following home treatment:

  • Eat foods that are soft and easy to swallow.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil) to reduce pain and swelling.
  • Apply a cold compress to the injured area for five minutes a few times a day. You can also suck on a piece of ice or fruit-flavored ice pop.
  • Rinse your mouth with a saltwater solution after eating to ease pain and keep the wound clean. To make a saltwater solution, mix 1 teaspoon of non-iodized salt in 1 cup of warm water.

Call your doctor for a tongue bite that doesn’t stop bleeding or shows signs of infection, new bleeding, or deformity. In adults, a good rule of thumb is to get medical attention when the edges of a tongue injury don’t come together when the tongue is still. Seek immediate medical care for a child if you notice:

  • a gaping cut on their tongue, lips, or inside of their mouth
  • intense pain that doesn’t improve within two hours of taking over-the-counter pain medication
  • difficulty swallowing liquids or spitting
  • inability to fully open or close the mouth
  • signs of infection and fever

Check all tongue injuries daily for changes in appearance or feel. Wounds in the mouth that are clean and healthy may appear light pink to white. Contact your doctor right away if you notice any signs of infection, such as:

  • pus
  • fever
  • pain that’s getting worse instead of better

Call 911 or your local emergency services for any major mouth bleeding that can’t be stopped or if you have trouble breathing. These may be signs of a life-threatening emergency. If you choose to see your doctor, they’ll first try to stop any bleeding and visually examine the area to determine the right treatment for you.

  • stitches to close a wound
  • antibiotics to treat or prevent infection
  • reattachment to connect part of the tongue that was bitten off (very uncommon)

If you’re prescribed antibiotics for a tongue or mouth injury, be sure to take them as directed. Don’t stop a course of antibiotics even if you’re feeling better. You can expect a small laceration on the tongue, lips, or inside of the mouth to heal in three to four days.

Do tongue wounds heal faster?

Does the Mouth Really Heal Faster Than the Rest of the Body? | Aesthetic Dentistry San Diego, CA Most of us are no stranger to mouth injuries. Whether it’s a canker sore, a bitten tongue or cheek, or even a burnt tongue from hot coffee, our mouths are subject to some pretty harsh conditions at times.

But what you may also have noticed is that mouth injuries of any kind seem to heal a lot faster than injuries elsewhere on the body. Have you ever wondered why they heal so quickly? If so, you’re not alone. In fact, a team of researchers from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland, asked the same question, and what they found may surprise you.

The institute’s study involved 30 individuals in good health who agreed to be injured for the project. Researchers took two one-eighth-inch punches of skin from each subject. One punch came from the inner cheek (inside the mouth) and the other from the underside of the subject’s arm.

  1. Researchers then monitored the healing process of each injury and found that, as hypothesized, the injuries in the mouth healed much quicker – within a few days – while the injuries on the underarms took upwards of two weeks to heal.
  2. But why? Well, researchers theorize that several conditions are at play when it comes to wound healing.

For starters, with oral wounds they noted that the body’s natural wound-repair genes kick into action in the mouth much faster than outside the mouth. They also found that the oral bacteria present in the mouth helped reduce inflammation of the wound, helping it to heal faster.

Furthermore, two proteins called “master healing proteins” are present in the mouth, also ushering along the healing process. The researchers plan to use this information to develop a means for external wounds to heal faster, which could be especially beneficial for higher-risk groups like the elderly and those with illnesses that slow healing, such as diabetes.

This study not only sheds some light on the inner workings of the body, but it also goes to show us yet again why keeping the mouth clean and healthy is a good idea. After all, the healthier the mouth, the more good bacteria are present to help reduce that inflammation.

Can a bitten tongue get infected?

In rare cases an untreated bite in the tongue may lead to infection. If you experience any of the following signs of an infection, seek medical attention right away: Fever. Excessive swelling or throbbing at site of injury.

You might be interested:  Icd 10 Code For Left Hip Pain

Why do tongue cuts heal so fast?

Mouth Tissue Is Different Than Skin Tissue – Another reason why your mouth bounces back from harm so quickly is that most of the tissue inside it is mucous tissue instead of regular skin, and the mucous membrane contains oodles and oodles of blood vessels.

Can you eat with a cut tongue?

Proper Diet — Avoid eating foods that could deepen the cut. Instead, opt for soft foods. Saltwater Solution — Rinse your mouth with a saltwater solution to prevent bacterial infection. Apply Ice — If the cut is deep enough to bleed, ice the wounded area to keep it from swelling.

Does saliva heal tongue wounds?

Abstract – Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing.

In addition, saliva contains several proteins which play a role in the different stages of wound healing. Saliva contains substantial amounts of tissue factor, which dramatically accelerates blood clotting. Subsequently, epidermal growth factor in saliva promotes the proliferation of epithelial cells.

Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor inhibits the tissue-degrading activity of enzymes like elastase and trypsin. Absence of this protease inhibitor delays oral wound healing. Salivary histatins in vitro promote wound closure by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration, but do not stimulate cell proliferation.

Do tongues grow back?

Abstract – Various abnormalities of the tongue, including cancers, commonly require surgical removal to sequester growth and metastasis. However, even minor resections can affect functional outcomes such as speech and swallowing, thereby reducing quality of life.

  • Surgical resections alone create volumetric muscle loss whereby muscle tissue cannot self-regenerate within the tongue.
  • In these cases, the tongue is reconstructed typically in the form of autologous skin flaps.
  • However, flap reconstruction has many limitations and unfortunately is the primary option for oral and reconstructive surgeons to treat tongue defects.

The alternative, but yet undeveloped, strategy for tongue reconstruction is regenerative medicine, which widely focuses on building new organs with stem cells. Regenerative medicine has successfully treated many tissues, but research has inadequately addressed the tongue as a vital organ in need of tissue engineering.

  • In this review, we address the current standard for tongue reconstruction, the cellular mechanisms of muscle cell development, and the stem cell studies that have attempted muscle engineering within the tongue.
  • Until now, no review has focused on engineering the tongue with regenerative medicine, which could guide innovative strategies for tongue reconstruction.

Impact statement Unlike other bodily organs, the current literature has inadequately addressed the tongue as a vital organ in need of tissue engineering. Therefore, this review seeks to highlight the clinical challenges of tongue reconstruction, alternative tissue engineering strategies, and to summarize the studies involving muscle regeneration within the tongue.

Do cuts in mouth heal on their own?

First aid for shallow cuts and wounds – To take care of cuts and wounds:

Calm your child and let him or her know you can help. Apply pressure with a clean cloth or bandage for several minutes to stop bleeding. Wash your hands well. If the wound is on the lips or outside area of the mouth, wash it well with soap and water once it has stopped bleeding. Do not scrub the wound. Remove any dirt particles from the area and let the water from the faucet run over it for several minutes. A dirty cut or scrape that is not well cleaned can cause scarring. Then:

Apply an antiseptic lotion or cream. Give your child an ice pop or ice cube to suck on to help reduce bleeding and swelling. Check the area each day and keep it clean and dry. Don’t blow on the wound, as this can cause germs to grow. Use a sunscreen (sun protection factor, or SPF, at least 15 or greater) on healed cuts and wounds to help prevent scarring.

If the wound is inside the mouth, rinse the area well with cool water for several minutes. Remove any dirt particles from the area. Then:

Give your child an ice pop or ice cube to suck on to help reduce bleeding and swelling. Check the area each day and keep it clean.

Even small cuts on the lips may cause a visible difference in the border or outline of the lips. These wounds may need stitches to keep the borders even and reduce the possibility of scars. Cuts that happen in the corner of the mouth where the upper and lower lips come together can have very severe bleeding. Cuts inside the mouth, even if they appear large, often heal on their own without the need for stitches. Bruises, blisters, or swelling on the lips caused by injury may be treated by sucking on ice pops or ice cubes or by applying a cold pack to the area every 1 to 2 hours for 10 to 15 minutes for the first 24 hours.

Why is the cut in my mouth white?

Gum color – At first, a cut on the gums can cause redness and swelling. As the wound heals, the affected areas may temporarily become white in color, It’s not uncommon for wounds inside the mouth to turn white, This is a standard response to trauma and should clear up within a few days.

What can I eat with a cut in my mouth?

Choose soft, bland foods. o Softer foods will be easier to chew and swallow. o Soups and stews are good options, as long as meats are soft and tender. o Try breakfast foods like instant oatmeal, grits, pancakes, waffles, and cold cereal that has been softened in milk. o Pick side dishes like cottage or ricotta cheese,

How do I know if my tongue is infected?

What are the symptoms of tongue problems? – Common symptoms that may affect your tongue include:

An enlarged or swollen tongue. Trouble moving your tongue. Complete or partial loss of taste. Change in your tongue color (white, yellow, dark red, purple, brown or black). Change in your tongue’s texture (smooth, covered in raised patches or hair-like growths). Pain, soreness or a burning sensation throughout your tongue or in certain parts.

Can a sore tongue heal itself?

Cancer treatments – Treatment for oral cancer usually consists of surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. If you notice changes in your tongue (like changes in color, bumps, or sores), that last for more than two weeks, visit a doctor or dentist. You should see a doctor sooner if you have the following symptoms alongside a sore tongue:

feverrashfatiguebleeding gumswhite patches in the mouthdiarrheainability to eat or drinkblisters or sores on other parts of the body

A doctor can find out if your tongue soreness is caused by an underlying condition, or if you simply need to make some changes to your oral hygiene routine. They can also test to rule out less-common causes of tongue soreness, like burning mouth syndrome and oral cancer.

Tongue issues caused by infections, like oral thrush, or syphilis, will likely require a prescription to get rid of the infection, so don’t delay making an appointment. If you need help finding a primary care doctor or dentist, you can browse doctors in your area through the Healthline FindCare tool,

Most causes of a sore tongue are temporary and aren’t serious. The most common causes of tongue soreness include:

injury, like biting or burning the tongueirritation from braces or dentures, brushing teeth too hard, or grinding your teeth at nightswollen taste buds (enlarged papillae), also called lie bumps canker sores oral thrush (yeast infection of the mouth)infections, like syphilis, hand, foot, and mouth disease, HPV, and scarlet fever menopause food sensitivities or allergies smoking and chewing tobaccoacid reflux dry mouth (xerostomia)medications

Less common causes for a sore tongue include:

You might be interested:  Muscle Pain Remedies At Home

vitamin deficiencies, such as vitamin B-12, iron, folate, niacin, or zincoral mucositis caused by chemotherapy and radiotherapy burning mouth syndrome neuralgia lichen planus Behcet’s disease Moeller’s glossitis pemphigus vulgaris Sjögren syndrome celiac disease oral cancer

A sore tongue usually isn’t serious, and may even resolve on its own within two weeks. In the meantime, you can try a few home remedies to ease the pain as you heal. Home remedies can also help with the symptoms of more serious medical conditions, like oral thrush and vitamin deficiencies, as part of the medical treatment plan recommended by a doctor.

How do you know if a cut on your tongue is infected?

The signs of an infection include: fever. swelling or throbbing. clear or white discharge.

What happens when your tongue has cuts?

Dehydration & your Tongue – While dehydration alone isn’t the cause of tongue cracks, it may be a factor. Dehydration may cause your tongue to become rough and dry. A dry tongue may be more prone to cracks and irritation. Dehydration can also weaken your immune system, increasing the risk of tongue fissures and making it harder to heal from them.

Dehydration can contribute to tongue issues like fissures and geographic tongue in other ways, or it can cause complications with these issues. A dry tongue is a symptom of dry mouth, If you have dry mouth, you are not producing enough saliva. Saliva production is key to oral health, as it helps to combat harmful bacteria (including plaque) and neutralizes the enamel-damaging acids created by bacteria.

Keeping your mouth and tongue hydrated will help improve your oral health and may help to prevent tongue fissures. If you already have a fissured or geographic tongue, it’s important to ensure that you’re not dehydrated and don’t have a dry tongue. The grooves caused by a fissured tongue can become hotspots for bacteria and food particles to hide.

What is the reason of cuts on tongue?

A non-fissured tongue is relatively flat across its length. A fissured tongue is marked by a deep, prominent groove in the middle. Some people with the condition report discomfort and sensitivities. Fissured tongue is a benign condition affecting the top surface of the tongue,

  • There may also be small furrows or fissures across the surface, causing the tongue to have a wrinkled appearance.
  • There may be one or more fissures of varying sizes and depths.
  • Fissured tongue occurs in approximately 5 percent of Americans.
  • It may be evident at birth or develop during childhood.
  • The exact cause of fissured tongue isn’t known.

However, it may sometimes occur in association with an underlying syndrome or condition, such as malnutrition or Down syndrome. A fissured tongue can make it appear as though the tongue were split in half lengthwise. Sometimes there are multiple fissures as well.

  • Your tongue may also appear cracked.
  • The deep groove in the tongue is usually very visible.
  • This makes it easy for your doctors and dentists to diagnose the condition.
  • The middle section of the tongue is most often affected, but there may also be fissures on other areas of the tongue.
  • You may experience another harmless tongue abnormality along with a fissured tongue, known as geographic tongue,

A normal tongue is covered with tiny, pinkish-white bumps called papillae. People with geographic tongue are missing papillae in different areas of the tongue. The spots without papillae are smooth and red and often have slightly raised borders. Neither fissured tongue nor geographic tongue is a contagious or harmful condition, nor does either condition usually cause any symptoms.

However, some people report some discomfort and increased sensitivity to certain substances. Researchers haven’t yet pinpointed the precise cause of fissured tongue. The condition may be genetic, as it’s often seen in higher concentrations within families. Fissured tongue may also be caused by a different underlying condition.

However, fissured tongue is thought by many to be a variation of a normal tongue. Signs of fissured tongue may be present during childhood, but the appearance tends to become more severe and prominent as you age. Men may be slightly more likely to have fissured tongue than women, and older adults with dry mouth tend to have more severe symptoms.

Fissured tongue is sometimes associated with certain syndromes, particularly Down syndrome and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. Down syndrome, also called trisomy 21, is a genetic condition that can cause a variety of physical and mental impairments. Those with Down syndrome have three copies of chromosome 21 instead of two.

Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is a neurological condition characterized by a fissured tongue, swelling of the face and upper lip, and Bell’s palsy, which is a form of facial paralysis. In rare cases, fissured tongue is also associated with certain conditions, including:

malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies psoriasis orofacial granulomatosis, a rare condition that causes swelling in the lips, mouth, and area around the mouth

Fissured tongue generally doesn’t require treatment. However, it’s important to maintain proper oral and dental care, such as brushing the top surface of the tongue to remove food debris and clean the tongue. Bacteria and plaque can collect in the fissures, leading to bad breath and an increased potential for tooth decay.

Can you kiss someone with a cut on your tongue?

We are committed to continuously improving access to our goods and services by individuals with disabilities. This website is currently being updated to enhance the usability and experience for persons with disabilities. If you are unable to use any aspect of this website because of a disability, please call 7742341043 and we will provide you with prompt personalized assistance. Kissing has its hazards and its helps, yet romantic implications aside, how is our oral health affected? First, the bad news: Kissing, like any physical interaction, can spread viruses or germs if one party is infected. If you have blisters such as cold sores, open cuts, bleeding gums, or any other open wounds in or near your mouth, spare your partner and take a break from kissing.

  • Any highly contagious virus or disease can be easily spread through contact with the mouth.
  • But the oh-so-good news: The production of saliva increases during kissing, which adds to the ranks of enzymes that protect our teeth from bacteria, viruses, and serve to strengthen our tooth enamel.
  • The natural wash of water in our mouths also rinses our teeth from residues and helps break down plaque.

Your face is also working hard while kissing. As your facial muscles are exercised, any tightness in your jaw or other areas near your mouth can loosen up and lessen discomfort or lingering soreness. Increased blood circulation and levels of oxytocin help relieve stress, aches and pains.

  • Those suffering from TMJ issues can particularly benefit from a healthy bout of kissing.
  • Although we do not recommend kissing as a replacement for any part of your oral health regimen, we advocate considering your oral health throughout your daily activities and interactions.
  • Iss responsibly.
  • Source Posted by: Terms and Conditions Here at Central New England Dental Associates, we work diligently to protect our patient’s rights and privacy.

Requesting an appointment via our Internet portal is considered part of what HIPAA has identified as electronically protected information (ePHI). Unfortunately, despite the best efforts we make or take, there are people or entities that may attempt to intercept the data you transmit to us.

By checking the box, and electronically making an appointment, you understand that you are making an appointment over the internet and that Central New England Dental Associates will keep this information confidential but cannot guarantee that others, outside of our practice, may not illegally intercept this communication.

As a result of continuing, you are sending this transmission and accepting the inherent risk(s) associated with making this request for an appointment. As an alternative, you are always welcome to contact our office via telephone to schedule your appointment.

Does saliva heal tongue wounds?

Abstract – Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing.

  • In addition, saliva contains several proteins which play a role in the different stages of wound healing.
  • Saliva contains substantial amounts of tissue factor, which dramatically accelerates blood clotting.
  • Subsequently, epidermal growth factor in saliva promotes the proliferation of epithelial cells.
You might be interested:  Yoga Poses To Reduce Period Pain

Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor inhibits the tissue-degrading activity of enzymes like elastase and trypsin. Absence of this protease inhibitor delays oral wound healing. Salivary histatins in vitro promote wound closure by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration, but do not stimulate cell proliferation.

What does a cracked tongue look like?

Other health issues – Cracked tongue may also have links to:

geographic tongue, which causes smooth, often raised patches to form on the tongue psoriasis Sjogren’s syndrome, an immune disorderCowden syndrome, which causes the formation of noncancerous tumorsacromegaly, a hormonal disorderorofacial granulomatosis, a rare inflammatory disorder Down syndrome Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, a rare neurological disorder

If a person has cracked tongue and geographic tongue, any pain may stem from the latter issue, which can cause burning pain and a loss of taste. Cracked tongue is characterized by one or more grooves running along the tongue’s surface. The number and depth of the grooves, or fissures, varies.

If the fissures are very deep, the tongue may seem to have distinct sections. In most cases of cracked tongue, a single groove runs down the tongue’s center. Beyond the appearance, cracked tongue usually causes no symptoms. People sometimes experience a burning sensation, especially when they consume acidic foods or drinks.

Research suggests that cracked tongue is more common — and the fissures more severe — in older people. Also, it is more prevalent in males than in females. Cracked tongue does not usually require treatment. People typically have no symptoms, other than the tongue’s characteristic appearance.

However, it is crucial to remove any debris, such as food, that can get stuck in the tongue’s grooves. Doing so can prevent infections and issues with oral hygiene. When a person has cracked tongue, bacteria or fungi, such as Candida albicans, can proliferate in the tongue’s grooves, leading to an infection,

In the case of a Candida, or yeast, infection, a doctor can prescribe a topical antifungal medication. This type of infection is more common in people who also have geographic tongue and in people who do not brush or otherwise clean their tongues. For anyone with cracked tongue, it is important to have good oral hygiene, including regular visits to the dentist.

  • Prevent food debris from collecting in the grooves of the tongue is key.
  • To do this, a person might use a tongue brush or scraper as part of their oral hygiene routine.
  • One 2013 study found that tongue brushing and scraping alongside regular tooth brushing not only keeps the tongue clean but also reduces plaque.

Learn more about tongue scraping here. If the grooves of a cracked tongue trap food, it can cause bacteria or yeast to proliferate, leading to an infection or other oral health issues. Anyone with a cracked tongue who experiences symptoms of an oral health problem should receive professional attention.

Is tongue bleeding serious?

How to Stop Bleeding on the Tongue – What happens when a bite or injury results in a bleeding tongue? If it’s a small cut, it will likely stop on its own after a few minutes. A deeper cut with more blood will require more attention. Here are a few tips on how to make a tongue stop bleeding.

Use a dry cloth: Take a dry cloth and apply pressure on the wound for a couple of minutes to slow or stop the bleeding. Keep pressure on the wound until the bleeding stops. Use an ice cube: If the bleeding doesn’t stop with just the cloth, wrap a piece of ice in the cloth and use it to apply pressure to the wound. The cold will slow or stop the bleeding. Rinse your mouth: You can use 1 part hydrogen peroxide and 1 part water to rinse the wound and stop the bleeding. Do not swallow the mixture. Instead, just swish it over the wound and spit it out.

If these methods don’t stop the bleeding from the tongue, contact your doctor right away. You may need to visit an emergency clinic if the bleeding does not subside. Also, if the bleeding does stop but the injury shows signs of infection after a couple of days, such as severe pain, pus, or fever, then visit your doctor right away.

Why is my tongue cracked?

A non-fissured tongue is relatively flat across its length. A fissured tongue is marked by a deep, prominent groove in the middle. Some people with the condition report discomfort and sensitivities. Fissured tongue is a benign condition affecting the top surface of the tongue,

  1. There may also be small furrows or fissures across the surface, causing the tongue to have a wrinkled appearance.
  2. There may be one or more fissures of varying sizes and depths.
  3. Fissured tongue occurs in approximately 5 percent of Americans.
  4. It may be evident at birth or develop during childhood.
  5. The exact cause of fissured tongue isn’t known.

However, it may sometimes occur in association with an underlying syndrome or condition, such as malnutrition or Down syndrome. A fissured tongue can make it appear as though the tongue were split in half lengthwise. Sometimes there are multiple fissures as well.

Your tongue may also appear cracked. The deep groove in the tongue is usually very visible. This makes it easy for your doctors and dentists to diagnose the condition. The middle section of the tongue is most often affected, but there may also be fissures on other areas of the tongue. You may experience another harmless tongue abnormality along with a fissured tongue, known as geographic tongue,

A normal tongue is covered with tiny, pinkish-white bumps called papillae. People with geographic tongue are missing papillae in different areas of the tongue. The spots without papillae are smooth and red and often have slightly raised borders. Neither fissured tongue nor geographic tongue is a contagious or harmful condition, nor does either condition usually cause any symptoms.

  • However, some people report some discomfort and increased sensitivity to certain substances.
  • Researchers haven’t yet pinpointed the precise cause of fissured tongue.
  • The condition may be genetic, as it’s often seen in higher concentrations within families.
  • Fissured tongue may also be caused by a different underlying condition.

However, fissured tongue is thought by many to be a variation of a normal tongue. Signs of fissured tongue may be present during childhood, but the appearance tends to become more severe and prominent as you age. Men may be slightly more likely to have fissured tongue than women, and older adults with dry mouth tend to have more severe symptoms.

  1. Fissured tongue is sometimes associated with certain syndromes, particularly Down syndrome and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome.
  2. Down syndrome, also called trisomy 21, is a genetic condition that can cause a variety of physical and mental impairments.
  3. Those with Down syndrome have three copies of chromosome 21 instead of two.

Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is a neurological condition characterized by a fissured tongue, swelling of the face and upper lip, and Bell’s palsy, which is a form of facial paralysis. In rare cases, fissured tongue is also associated with certain conditions, including:

malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies psoriasis orofacial granulomatosis, a rare condition that causes swelling in the lips, mouth, and area around the mouth

Fissured tongue generally doesn’t require treatment. However, it’s important to maintain proper oral and dental care, such as brushing the top surface of the tongue to remove food debris and clean the tongue. Bacteria and plaque can collect in the fissures, leading to bad breath and an increased potential for tooth decay.