How To Treat Ear Pain Due To Cold

0 Comments

How To Treat Ear Pain Due To Cold
The dull, sharp, or burning earache will go away with the cold. Since colds are caused by viruses, the best you can do is treat the cold symptoms and wait out the infection. Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Advil or Motrin (ibuprofen) can help ease your earache.

Why your ears hurt when you have a cold?

When Earaches Mean a Cold – While it’s not commonly thought of, the common cold can actually cause ear pain. During a cold, fluid in the middle ear can accumulate, which puts pressure on the eardrum, causing inflammation and pain. If the ear pain is caused by a cold, it should go away as the sinuses drain and pressure on the eardrum disappears.

Can paracetamol cure ear pain?

How can I treat earache at home? You can ask your pharmacist about using over-the-counter painkillers such as paracetamol or ibuprofen to treat the pain. Children under the age of 16 should not take aspirin. Placing a warm flannel against the affected ear may also help relieve the pain.

How do you sleep with an earache?

Sleep position – How you sleep can affect ear pain. Rest with your head on two or more pillows, so your affected ear is higher than the rest of your body. Or if your left ear has an infection, sleep on your right side. Less pressure equals less ear pain. It could be effective, though a few inches may not make a big difference in pressure measurement. But if it makes you feel better, go for it.

How long does a cold in the ear last?

Treating middle ear infections – Most middle ear infections (otitis media) clear up within three to five days and don’t need any specific treatment. You can relieve any pain and a high temperature using over the counter painkillers such as paracetamol and ibuprofen,

Will ear pain from a cold go away?

The dull, sharp, or burning earache will go away with the cold. Since colds are caused by viruses, the best you can do is treat the cold symptoms and wait out the infection. Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Advil or Motrin (ibuprofen) can help ease your earache.

Why is ear pain worse at night?

Find out what factors contribute to kids’ illness symptoms worsening at night. KIDS’ COUGHS SEEM TO BECOME HORRIBLE AT NIGHT. WHY IS THAT? Young children may, several times a year, have a virus that triggers swelling of the vocal cords, arrives swiftly, typically in the middle of the night, and results in a child who is acutely short of breath, and scared! The respiratory tract around the airways and vocal cords has a rich blood supply. When inflammation strikes, that supply amps up, and when a child lies down, the area around the vocal cords is literally engorged with increased blood flow and swelling. Rather than breathing through an air column the size of a pencil, your child is breathing through one the size of a skinny straw. When a child lies down, the area around the vocal cords is engorged with increased blood flow WHAT CAN WE DO TO HELP ? We want to get the child upright, cool and humidify the air. To some, that might mean steaming in the shower for 10-15 minutes, hovering over a vaporizer, or simply bundling up and going outside in the cool air (or in the summer, to a room cooled by the AC, or opening the freezer door and hovering there for a few minutes). Typically this will ease the bark and you can put your child back to sleep, typically with a dose of pain relief so the cough doesn’t hurt him and scare him more) WHEN IS IT TIME TO SEE A DOCTOR? If the bark is only there with crying, but silences with rest you are good to wait until the next morning for a visit. However if the bark (called stridor) is there at rest, persists, and your child is struggling for breath, off to the ER! LET’S DISCUSS EARACHES. WHY ARE THEY SO PAINFUL AT BEDTIME? Having had them myself, and experiencing them many times with my son, it is so true that nights are really tough. Earaches typically arise when there is either an internal infection (otitis media) typically during or after a cold, or swimmer’s ear (or otitis externa), occurring after moisture breaks down the protective coating of the ear canal and painful inflammation occurs. Pain is worse at night, again because of low cortisol levels. Lying down also backs up drainage into the middle ear, causing pressure on the eardrum and pain. With swimmer’s ear, even the ear touching a pillow can cause excruciating discomfort, and pain is always worse without daytime distractions. HOW CAN WE HELP ALLEVIATE THE PAIN? Alleviate pain with oral pain relief. If your child has had a cold, and develops an earache, you can put some warm olive oil into the ears and plug with cotton (if there are no PETubes or drainage). The oil coats the eardrum and can soothe pain to get you through the night until you can see your doc the next day. Sleeping on a warm compress helps as well. For kids with ear pain, no colds, and a history of being at the pool, the beach, submerged, oral pain relief overnight is the name of the game, as you don’t want to put anything into that ear except medication – otherwise there may be more pain. For prevention of swimmer’s ear, routinely dry the ears and instill 3-5 drops of white vinegar or rubbing alcohol in each ear after swimming, shake it out, and dry gently with a blow dryer on cool. This changes the environment of the ear canal and can prevent those painful episodes. ASTHMA/ALLERGIES: Children with asthma often are up at night, short of breath, coughing, or in distress. WHY IT HAPPENS: Cortisol provides a protective cushion during the day for a child with asthma – decreasing swelling of the inside of the airways, and holding back histamine release. At night, especially if a child has been triggered by smoke, a viral illness, or even a day in the park, cortisol isn’t there to protect and as a result airway linings swell, and histamine elevations cause excessive mucous production in the bronchi, leading to coughing, spasm, and asthma. For an allergic child, lower cortisol and increased histamine release, coupled with the possibility that dust mites and pet dander are typically highly concentrated around the bed, an allergic child may get worse just by being in his/her bedroom. HOW TO HELP: For children allergic to dustmites, dust or pet danders, keeping the bedroom door closed to prevent animal visitors should be the rule. A hypoallergenic dust cover for the mattress, box spring and pillow often is helpful. Talk to your allergist about substituting synthetic material in pillows and comforters if your child is allergic to feathers. And get rid of miniblinds, dust ruffles, and canopies – they are dust catchers. Vacuum often, or better yet, take carpeting out of the room. For your asthmatic child, make sure that not only are your emergency inhaled medications (bronchodilators) up to date and in the house, but that your child’s controller medications (inhaled steroids) are being regularly given, especially during cold and flu season. WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOC: If your child has 2 or more asthma attacks each week, the asthma is poorly controlled, and a new action plan needs to be developed with your doctor. If bronchodilators given fail to control symptoms of asthma, or if shortness of breath or cough worsens despite medication, a call to your doc, and/or a trip to the ER is indicated! EARACHES Having had them myself, and experiencing them many times with my son, it is so true that nights are really tough. Earaches typically arise when there is either an internal infection (otitis media) typically during or after a cold, or swimmer’s ear (or otitis externa), occurring after moisture breaks down the protective coating of the ear canal and painful inflammation occurs. WHY IT HAPPENS: Pain is worse at night because of low cortisol levels. Laying down also backs up drainage into the middle ear, causing pressure on the eardrum and pain. With swimmer’s ear, even the ear touching a pillow can cause excrutiating discomfort, and pain is always worse without daytime distractions. WHAT TO DO: Alleviate pain with oral pain relief. If your child has had a cold, and develops an earache, you can put some warm olive oil into the ears and plug with cotton (if there are no PETubes or drainage). The oil coats the eardrum and can soothe pain to get you through the night until you can see your doc the next day. Sleeping on a warm compress helps as well. For kids with ear pain, no colds, and a history of being at the pool, the beach, submerged, oral pain relief overnight is the name of the game, as you don’t want to put anything into that ear except medication – otherwise there may be more pain. For prevention of swimmer’s ear, routinely dry the ears and instill 3-5 drops of white vinegar or rubbing alcohol in each ear after swimming, shake it out, and dry gently with a blow dryer on cool. This changes the environment of the ear canal and can prevent those painful episodes. WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOC: If pain persists into the morning, if pus or drainage from the ears, or just a miserable child, see your doctor. CROUP If you wake up and hear barking in your house, it may not be your dog. Young children may, several times a year, have a virus that triggers swelling of the vocal cords, arrives swiftly, typically in the middle of the night, and results in a child who is acutely short of breath, and scared! WHY IT HAPPENS: The respiratory tract around the airways and vocal cords has a rich blood supply. When inflammation strikes, that supply amps up, and when a child lies down, the area around the vocal cords is literally engorged with increased blood flow and swelling. Rather than breathing through an air column the size of a pencil, your child is breathing through one the size of a skinny straw. WHAT TO DO: We want to get the child upright, cool and humidify the air. To some, that might mean steaming in the shower for 10-15 minutes, hovering over a vaporizer, or simply bundling up and going outside in the cool air (or in the summer, to a room cooled by the AC, or opening the freezer door and hovering there for a few minutes). Typically this will ease the bark and you can put your child back to sleep, typically with a dose of pain relief so the cough doesn’t hurt him and scare him more. WHEN TO SEE A DOC: If the bark is only there with crying, but silences with rest you are good to wait until the next morning for a visit. However if the bark (called stridor) is there at rest, persists, and your child is struggling for breath, off to the ER! Why Illness Gets Worse At Night – Home & Family Return to Episode Guide >> Board certified pediatrician Dr. JJ Levenstein, MD, FAAP Take parenting classes instructed by Dr. Levenstein online by visiting www.momassembly.com. To learn more about parents’ concerns with kids go to her Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CallingDoctorJJ,

You might be interested:  Will Homeopathy Cure Thyroid

How long does ear pain last?

Check if it’s an ear infection – The symptoms of an ear infection usually start quickly and include:

  • pain inside the ear
  • a high temperature
  • being sick
  • a lack of energy
  • difficulty hearing
  • discharge running out of the ear
  • a feeling of pressure or fullness inside the ear
  • itching and irritation in and around the ear
  • scaly skin in and around the ear

Young children and babies with an ear infection may also:

  • rub or pull their ear
  • not react to some sounds
  • be irritable or restless
  • be off their food
  • keep losing their balance

Most ear infections clear up within 3 days, although sometimes symptoms can last up to a week. If you, or your child, have a high temperature or you do not feel well enough to do your normal activities, try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people until you feel better. Differences between inner, middle and outer ear infections

Differences between middle and outer ear infections

Inner ear infection Middle ear infection (otitis media) Outer ear infection (otitis externa)
Can affect both children and adults Usually affects children Usually affects adults aged 45 to 75
Caused by viral or bacterial infections Caused by viruses like colds and flu Caused by something irritating the ear canal, such as eczema, water or wearing earplugs
Affects parts of the inner ear like the labyrinth and vestibular system, and can lead to labyrinthitis Affects the eustachian tube, which connects the middle ear (area behind the eardrum) to the back of the nose Affects the ear canal (the tube between the outer ear and the eardrum)

Does ibuprofen help with ear pain?

Managing pain – Your doctor will advise you on treatments to lessen pain from an ear infection. These may include the following:

Pain medication. Your doctor may advise the use of over-the-counter acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) to relieve pain. Use the drugs as directed on the label. Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin because aspirin has been linked with Reye’s syndrome. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns. Anesthetic drops. These may be used to relieve pain if the eardrum doesn’t have a hole or tear in it.

What drinks help earache?

Gargling with Salt Water – An earache is sometimes associated with a sore throat, and gargling with salt water can help ease your symptoms. Simply mix a 1 to 5 ratio of salt to warm water, then gargle, spit out, and repeat. If you have a sore throat, warm liquids like honey and lemon tea or a broth soup can provide some relief.

Why put warm olive oil in ear?

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission Here’s our process, Medical News Today only shows you brands and products that we stand behind. Our team thoroughly researches and evaluates the recommendations we make on our site. To establish that the product manufacturers addressed safety and efficacy standards, we:

Evaluate ingredients and composition: Do they have the potential to cause harm? Fact-check all health claims: Do they align with the current body of scientific evidence? Assess the brand: Does it operate with integrity and adhere to industry best practices?

We do the research so you can find trusted products for your health and wellness. Using olive oil to break up earwax is a home remedy some people use to remove earwax plugs from the ear. But does olive oil work, and is it safe? Earwax is a thick substance that helps moisturize and protect the ears.

It also helps remove dirt and dead skin cells in the ear. Though many people feel the need to clean their ears and remove the excess wax, there is no medical or hygiene need to do so. The ear is completely self-cleaning, and earwax plays an essential role in this process. People produce different amounts of earwax, and this is unrelated to hygiene.

In particular, older people and those with lots of hair in their ears are more likely to have larger amounts of earwax. Read on for the answers to some common questions about using olive oil in the ears. People can use warm olive oil to help break up earwax that has hardened and become stuck in the ear canal.

The oil helps to soften the earwax, making it easier for it to move out of the canal. In addition, some people suggest that placing a few drops of warmed olive oil into the ear of someone with an ear infection can be soothing and comforting. While it is unlikely to cause harm, there is no research to show that this remedy is effective.

Though most people are aware of the risk of using cotton swabs to clean their ears, many still admit that they use them to remove excess earwax. By using cotton swabs, there is a risk of accidentally sticking the swab too deep into the ear and damaging the eardrum.

Also, cotton swabs can push earwax deeper into the ear canal where it can harden and become a plug. Olive oil may be a safe alternative. The authors of a 2013 study looked at people who placed drops of olive oil in their ear every night to see if the oil altered the amount of earwax. They found that, contrary to their hypothesis, the earwax actually increased in the ears of people who used olive oil drops regularly, and the oil did not help it come out naturally.

However, they also found that the wax was more easily removable when people sprayed olive oil into their ear just prior to a doctor’s irrigation. Some practitioners caution on the use of olive oil as the wax expands and can increase pain. A 2010 study suggested that olive oil was more effective than no treatment but less effective than triethanolamine polypeptide, a type of eardrop that a doctor may use.

  1. The researchers found that wet irrigation, such as with water or olive oil, is better than dry irrigation.
  2. They also found that adverse events from at-home irrigation were minor, so using olive oil might be a safe option.
  3. Talk to your doctor to find out if olive oil is right for you.
  4. To put olive oil in the ear, lie down on one side with the affected ear facing upward.

Then gently pull the upper ear up and back. This method opens the ear canal and helps the oil go straight into the canal. Use an eyedropper to drop 2–3 drops of oil into the ear. Some people prefer to dip a cotton swab into the oil and allow the oil to drip into the ear.

Take care not to put the eyedropper or cotton swab directly into the ear canal. Gently rub the skin in front of the ear, near the jaw, to help the oil settle down into the canal. Remain lying down to let the ear absorb the oil. Oil may run out of the ear upon standing. If this happens, use a tissue to wipe it up.

Some people chose to warm the oil before putting it in their ear. Make sure to place a few drops of the oil on the inside of the wrist to test the temperature. Do not place the oil in the ear if it is too hot. If a person does not get relief from the oil, it is best to see a doctor.

Olive oil is generally safe to use in small quantities in the ear. However, people with a ruptured eardrum should never put olive oil or other substances in the ear. Irrigating the ear with olive oil can cause side effects such as itching, outer ear infections, dizziness, and skin irritation. Anyone with an allergy to olives or olive oil should not try this remedy.

It is also vital to be cautious when using this home remedy with children. Do not use hot olive oil, as it may burn the child. If someone has ear pain that does not go away after a few days of home remedies, it is best to see a doctor. Also, anyone who suspects that they might have a ruptured eardrum or symptoms of an ear infection, such as pain and swelling, should contact their doctor.

  1. Though using olive oil in the ear may have some benefits, there is not sufficient research to conclude that it is more effective than medical remedies.
  2. Some research suggests it may make an earwax buildup worse.
  3. However, it is usually safe to try this home remedy as long as a person takes a few precautions, such as using a small amount and not overheating it.

Anyone who wishes to try using olive oil for an earwax buildup or ear pain should consult a doctor if their symptoms do not improve. People can purchase olive oil in their local grocery store or online,

What is the best painkiller for earache?

How can I treat earache? – How you treat your earache depends on what is causing your pain. If your pain is coming from a build-up of wax, you may need ear drops to soften the wax. You might need to have your ear canal cleaned by a health professional.

If your earache is caused by a middle ear infection, it’s likely to get better on its own within 7 days and usually won’t need antibiotics, Until the pain gets better, you can use simple pain relief medicines like paracetamol or ibuprofen. If your earache is caused by an outer ear infection, you may need a prescription for antibiotic ear drops to treat it.

The drops may contain other medicines such as steroids. Never try to remove something stuck inside your ear by yourself — ask your doctor for help.

Why won’t my ear pain go away?

If you experience ear pain that doesn’t go away or gets worse within 24 to 48 hours you should call your doctor’s office. Also call your doctor if you have severe pain that suddenly stops. This could be a sign that your eardrum has ruptured.

Should I sleep on the ear that hurts?

How to sleep with an ear infection – Certain sleeping positions can either make earache symptoms worse or better. If you are experiencing an ear pain, you should not sleep on the side where you have the pain. Instead, try to sleep with the affected ear raised or elevated – these two positions should reduce the pain and not aggravate your ear infection any further.

Does drinking water help an ear infection?

There are several things you can do to help relieve your symptoms related to a middle ear infection. Increasing your water intake is one important step you can take to assist your body with clearing the infection. You should drink plenty of water to help flush bacteria and viruses out of the body.

What is the best position to drain your ear?

These Tips Will Help Get Rid of Water in Your Ears – Water in your ears can cause a plugged-up sensation and make sounds appear muffled. You might experience ear pain,, and loss of balance and coordination, a runny nose or a sore throat. When water accumulates in the ear and doesn’t drain properly, you risk developing, surfer’s ear or another type of infection that can cause hearing loss if left untreated.

The Gravity/Jiggling Technique. Lie on the ground with your affected ear parallel to the floor, tilt your head and jiggle your earlobe. Gravity will take care of the rest! You can use a cotton swab to remove any water remaining in your ears. The Valsalva Maneuver. Scuba divers and airline travelers are familiar with this trick. It involves plugging your nose and blowing it using modest force; this helps to normalize the pressure in your ears and should allow water to drain. The Vacuum Technique. Placing the palm of your hand over your plugged-up ear and pressing gently for a few seconds will create a suction effect that should help dislodge water from the canals. Repeat until it is all gone. The Hairdryer Technique. Using a hairdryer on its lowest heat setting and aiming it at your ear (don’t get too close) will help the water to evaporate and dry out your ear canals. Don’t worry, if you don’t get rid of it all at first, the rest should drain on its own. The Pulling Technique. Reach around the back of your head and tug gently on the outer portion of your ear with your opposing hand. This will straighten out the ear canal and allow water to drain out. The Chew and Yawn Technique. Moving your mouth and jaw help equalize pressure in the Eustachian tubes. Try chewing gum and yawning to encourage built-up water to drain out. Shaking your head afterwards provides an extra assist if you can’t quite get it all. The Chemical Technique. If none of these natural techniques help, there are a number of over-the-counter alcohol-based ear drops designed to remove moisture from the ear canals.

Your recommends wearing or a swim cap whenever you are going to be exposed to water in order to prevent it from entering your ears, and to dry them thoroughly afterwards. If you have water trapped in your ears and can’t get it out using these techniques, make an appointment as soon as possible. Call LeMay Hearing & Balance at for more information or to schedule an appointment. : Foolproof Techniques for Removing Water from Your Ears | LeMay Hearing & Balance | Blog

How quickly can a cold turn into an ear infection?

What causes an ear infection? – Ear infections start when fluid containing bacteria or viruses get trapped in your ear. Over time, these trapped germs can grow into an ear infection. These germs often come from other illnesses that cause swelling and congestion in your nasal passages and throat.

How do you know when a cold turns into an ear infection?

It’s not just kids who get ear infections — adults can have them, too. Here’s how to reduce your risk. – If you feel pain or fullness in your ear, notice fluid leaking out or are having trouble you might have an ear infection. Although more common in children, adults can get them, as well — especially in the, when colds and flu lead to secondary infections.

  1. Ear infections occur when your middle ear gets clogged and air can’t get through, creating a moist breeding ground for bacteria.
  2. Simple acute ear infections can occur if the Eustachian tube, which connects the nose to the middle ear space, gets blocked and fluid builds up,” says an at and chair and professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

“Children are more likely to get ear infections, because their Eustachian tubes are shorter and more horizontal, so they don’t drain as well.” You can take measures to reduce your risk of infection, especially in the colder months when they are more common:

Why do colds get worse at night?

Research shows that the immune system follows a circadian rhythm and that the cells involved in healing and inflammation tend to rev up in the evening. Some evidence suggests that more white blood cells (WBCs) are sent to your tissues to fight off infection during the night compared to the day.

Will ear pain from a cold go away?

The dull, sharp, or burning earache will go away with the cold. Since colds are caused by viruses, the best you can do is treat the cold symptoms and wait out the infection. Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Advil or Motrin (ibuprofen) can help ease your earache.

How long does ear pain last?

Check if it’s an ear infection – The symptoms of an ear infection usually start quickly and include:

  • pain inside the ear
  • a high temperature
  • being sick
  • a lack of energy
  • difficulty hearing
  • discharge running out of the ear
  • a feeling of pressure or fullness inside the ear
  • itching and irritation in and around the ear
  • scaly skin in and around the ear

Young children and babies with an ear infection may also:

  • rub or pull their ear
  • not react to some sounds
  • be irritable or restless
  • be off their food
  • keep losing their balance

Most ear infections clear up within 3 days, although sometimes symptoms can last up to a week. If you, or your child, have a high temperature or you do not feel well enough to do your normal activities, try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people until you feel better. Differences between inner, middle and outer ear infections

Differences between middle and outer ear infections

Inner ear infection Middle ear infection (otitis media) Outer ear infection (otitis externa)
Can affect both children and adults Usually affects children Usually affects adults aged 45 to 75
Caused by viral or bacterial infections Caused by viruses like colds and flu Caused by something irritating the ear canal, such as eczema, water or wearing earplugs
Affects parts of the inner ear like the labyrinth and vestibular system, and can lead to labyrinthitis Affects the eustachian tube, which connects the middle ear (area behind the eardrum) to the back of the nose Affects the ear canal (the tube between the outer ear and the eardrum)

Why is ear pain worse at night?

Find out what factors contribute to kids’ illness symptoms worsening at night. KIDS’ COUGHS SEEM TO BECOME HORRIBLE AT NIGHT. WHY IS THAT? Young children may, several times a year, have a virus that triggers swelling of the vocal cords, arrives swiftly, typically in the middle of the night, and results in a child who is acutely short of breath, and scared! The respiratory tract around the airways and vocal cords has a rich blood supply. When inflammation strikes, that supply amps up, and when a child lies down, the area around the vocal cords is literally engorged with increased blood flow and swelling. Rather than breathing through an air column the size of a pencil, your child is breathing through one the size of a skinny straw. When a child lies down, the area around the vocal cords is engorged with increased blood flow WHAT CAN WE DO TO HELP ? We want to get the child upright, cool and humidify the air. To some, that might mean steaming in the shower for 10-15 minutes, hovering over a vaporizer, or simply bundling up and going outside in the cool air (or in the summer, to a room cooled by the AC, or opening the freezer door and hovering there for a few minutes). Typically this will ease the bark and you can put your child back to sleep, typically with a dose of pain relief so the cough doesn’t hurt him and scare him more) WHEN IS IT TIME TO SEE A DOCTOR? If the bark is only there with crying, but silences with rest you are good to wait until the next morning for a visit. However if the bark (called stridor) is there at rest, persists, and your child is struggling for breath, off to the ER! LET’S DISCUSS EARACHES. WHY ARE THEY SO PAINFUL AT BEDTIME? Having had them myself, and experiencing them many times with my son, it is so true that nights are really tough. Earaches typically arise when there is either an internal infection (otitis media) typically during or after a cold, or swimmer’s ear (or otitis externa), occurring after moisture breaks down the protective coating of the ear canal and painful inflammation occurs. Pain is worse at night, again because of low cortisol levels. Lying down also backs up drainage into the middle ear, causing pressure on the eardrum and pain. With swimmer’s ear, even the ear touching a pillow can cause excruciating discomfort, and pain is always worse without daytime distractions. HOW CAN WE HELP ALLEVIATE THE PAIN? Alleviate pain with oral pain relief. If your child has had a cold, and develops an earache, you can put some warm olive oil into the ears and plug with cotton (if there are no PETubes or drainage). The oil coats the eardrum and can soothe pain to get you through the night until you can see your doc the next day. Sleeping on a warm compress helps as well. For kids with ear pain, no colds, and a history of being at the pool, the beach, submerged, oral pain relief overnight is the name of the game, as you don’t want to put anything into that ear except medication – otherwise there may be more pain. For prevention of swimmer’s ear, routinely dry the ears and instill 3-5 drops of white vinegar or rubbing alcohol in each ear after swimming, shake it out, and dry gently with a blow dryer on cool. This changes the environment of the ear canal and can prevent those painful episodes. ASTHMA/ALLERGIES: Children with asthma often are up at night, short of breath, coughing, or in distress. WHY IT HAPPENS: Cortisol provides a protective cushion during the day for a child with asthma – decreasing swelling of the inside of the airways, and holding back histamine release. At night, especially if a child has been triggered by smoke, a viral illness, or even a day in the park, cortisol isn’t there to protect and as a result airway linings swell, and histamine elevations cause excessive mucous production in the bronchi, leading to coughing, spasm, and asthma. For an allergic child, lower cortisol and increased histamine release, coupled with the possibility that dust mites and pet dander are typically highly concentrated around the bed, an allergic child may get worse just by being in his/her bedroom. HOW TO HELP: For children allergic to dustmites, dust or pet danders, keeping the bedroom door closed to prevent animal visitors should be the rule. A hypoallergenic dust cover for the mattress, box spring and pillow often is helpful. Talk to your allergist about substituting synthetic material in pillows and comforters if your child is allergic to feathers. And get rid of miniblinds, dust ruffles, and canopies – they are dust catchers. Vacuum often, or better yet, take carpeting out of the room. For your asthmatic child, make sure that not only are your emergency inhaled medications (bronchodilators) up to date and in the house, but that your child’s controller medications (inhaled steroids) are being regularly given, especially during cold and flu season. WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOC: If your child has 2 or more asthma attacks each week, the asthma is poorly controlled, and a new action plan needs to be developed with your doctor. If bronchodilators given fail to control symptoms of asthma, or if shortness of breath or cough worsens despite medication, a call to your doc, and/or a trip to the ER is indicated! EARACHES Having had them myself, and experiencing them many times with my son, it is so true that nights are really tough. Earaches typically arise when there is either an internal infection (otitis media) typically during or after a cold, or swimmer’s ear (or otitis externa), occurring after moisture breaks down the protective coating of the ear canal and painful inflammation occurs. WHY IT HAPPENS: Pain is worse at night because of low cortisol levels. Laying down also backs up drainage into the middle ear, causing pressure on the eardrum and pain. With swimmer’s ear, even the ear touching a pillow can cause excrutiating discomfort, and pain is always worse without daytime distractions. WHAT TO DO: Alleviate pain with oral pain relief. If your child has had a cold, and develops an earache, you can put some warm olive oil into the ears and plug with cotton (if there are no PETubes or drainage). The oil coats the eardrum and can soothe pain to get you through the night until you can see your doc the next day. Sleeping on a warm compress helps as well. For kids with ear pain, no colds, and a history of being at the pool, the beach, submerged, oral pain relief overnight is the name of the game, as you don’t want to put anything into that ear except medication – otherwise there may be more pain. For prevention of swimmer’s ear, routinely dry the ears and instill 3-5 drops of white vinegar or rubbing alcohol in each ear after swimming, shake it out, and dry gently with a blow dryer on cool. This changes the environment of the ear canal and can prevent those painful episodes. WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOC: If pain persists into the morning, if pus or drainage from the ears, or just a miserable child, see your doctor. CROUP If you wake up and hear barking in your house, it may not be your dog. Young children may, several times a year, have a virus that triggers swelling of the vocal cords, arrives swiftly, typically in the middle of the night, and results in a child who is acutely short of breath, and scared! WHY IT HAPPENS: The respiratory tract around the airways and vocal cords has a rich blood supply. When inflammation strikes, that supply amps up, and when a child lies down, the area around the vocal cords is literally engorged with increased blood flow and swelling. Rather than breathing through an air column the size of a pencil, your child is breathing through one the size of a skinny straw. WHAT TO DO: We want to get the child upright, cool and humidify the air. To some, that might mean steaming in the shower for 10-15 minutes, hovering over a vaporizer, or simply bundling up and going outside in the cool air (or in the summer, to a room cooled by the AC, or opening the freezer door and hovering there for a few minutes). Typically this will ease the bark and you can put your child back to sleep, typically with a dose of pain relief so the cough doesn’t hurt him and scare him more. WHEN TO SEE A DOC: If the bark is only there with crying, but silences with rest you are good to wait until the next morning for a visit. However if the bark (called stridor) is there at rest, persists, and your child is struggling for breath, off to the ER! Why Illness Gets Worse At Night – Home & Family Return to Episode Guide >> Board certified pediatrician Dr. JJ Levenstein, MD, FAAP Take parenting classes instructed by Dr. Levenstein online by visiting www.momassembly.com. To learn more about parents’ concerns with kids go to her Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CallingDoctorJJ,

Why put warm olive oil in ear?

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission Here’s our process, Medical News Today only shows you brands and products that we stand behind. Our team thoroughly researches and evaluates the recommendations we make on our site. To establish that the product manufacturers addressed safety and efficacy standards, we:

Evaluate ingredients and composition: Do they have the potential to cause harm? Fact-check all health claims: Do they align with the current body of scientific evidence? Assess the brand: Does it operate with integrity and adhere to industry best practices?

We do the research so you can find trusted products for your health and wellness. Using olive oil to break up earwax is a home remedy some people use to remove earwax plugs from the ear. But does olive oil work, and is it safe? Earwax is a thick substance that helps moisturize and protect the ears.

It also helps remove dirt and dead skin cells in the ear. Though many people feel the need to clean their ears and remove the excess wax, there is no medical or hygiene need to do so. The ear is completely self-cleaning, and earwax plays an essential role in this process. People produce different amounts of earwax, and this is unrelated to hygiene.

In particular, older people and those with lots of hair in their ears are more likely to have larger amounts of earwax. Read on for the answers to some common questions about using olive oil in the ears. People can use warm olive oil to help break up earwax that has hardened and become stuck in the ear canal.

  1. The oil helps to soften the earwax, making it easier for it to move out of the canal.
  2. In addition, some people suggest that placing a few drops of warmed olive oil into the ear of someone with an ear infection can be soothing and comforting.
  3. While it is unlikely to cause harm, there is no research to show that this remedy is effective.

Though most people are aware of the risk of using cotton swabs to clean their ears, many still admit that they use them to remove excess earwax. By using cotton swabs, there is a risk of accidentally sticking the swab too deep into the ear and damaging the eardrum.

  1. Also, cotton swabs can push earwax deeper into the ear canal where it can harden and become a plug.
  2. Olive oil may be a safe alternative.
  3. The authors of a 2013 study looked at people who placed drops of olive oil in their ear every night to see if the oil altered the amount of earwax.
  4. They found that, contrary to their hypothesis, the earwax actually increased in the ears of people who used olive oil drops regularly, and the oil did not help it come out naturally.

However, they also found that the wax was more easily removable when people sprayed olive oil into their ear just prior to a doctor’s irrigation. Some practitioners caution on the use of olive oil as the wax expands and can increase pain. A 2010 study suggested that olive oil was more effective than no treatment but less effective than triethanolamine polypeptide, a type of eardrop that a doctor may use.

  • The researchers found that wet irrigation, such as with water or olive oil, is better than dry irrigation.
  • They also found that adverse events from at-home irrigation were minor, so using olive oil might be a safe option.
  • Talk to your doctor to find out if olive oil is right for you.
  • To put olive oil in the ear, lie down on one side with the affected ear facing upward.

Then gently pull the upper ear up and back. This method opens the ear canal and helps the oil go straight into the canal. Use an eyedropper to drop 2–3 drops of oil into the ear. Some people prefer to dip a cotton swab into the oil and allow the oil to drip into the ear.

Take care not to put the eyedropper or cotton swab directly into the ear canal. Gently rub the skin in front of the ear, near the jaw, to help the oil settle down into the canal. Remain lying down to let the ear absorb the oil. Oil may run out of the ear upon standing. If this happens, use a tissue to wipe it up.

Some people chose to warm the oil before putting it in their ear. Make sure to place a few drops of the oil on the inside of the wrist to test the temperature. Do not place the oil in the ear if it is too hot. If a person does not get relief from the oil, it is best to see a doctor.

Olive oil is generally safe to use in small quantities in the ear. However, people with a ruptured eardrum should never put olive oil or other substances in the ear. Irrigating the ear with olive oil can cause side effects such as itching, outer ear infections, dizziness, and skin irritation. Anyone with an allergy to olives or olive oil should not try this remedy.

It is also vital to be cautious when using this home remedy with children. Do not use hot olive oil, as it may burn the child. If someone has ear pain that does not go away after a few days of home remedies, it is best to see a doctor. Also, anyone who suspects that they might have a ruptured eardrum or symptoms of an ear infection, such as pain and swelling, should contact their doctor.

Though using olive oil in the ear may have some benefits, there is not sufficient research to conclude that it is more effective than medical remedies. Some research suggests it may make an earwax buildup worse. However, it is usually safe to try this home remedy as long as a person takes a few precautions, such as using a small amount and not overheating it.

Anyone who wishes to try using olive oil for an earwax buildup or ear pain should consult a doctor if their symptoms do not improve. People can purchase olive oil in their local grocery store or online,