How To Treat Leg Ulcer At Home

0 Comments

How To Treat Leg Ulcer At Home
Venous ulcers (open sores) can occur when the veins in your legs do not push blood back up to your heart as well as they should. Blood backs up in the veins, building up pressure. If not treated, increased pressure and excess fluid in the affected area can cause an open sore to form.

  1. Most venous ulcers occur on the leg, above the ankle.
  2. This type of wound can be slow to heal.
  3. The cause of venous ulcers is high pressure in the veins of the lower leg.
  4. The veins have one-way valves that keep blood flowing up toward your heart.
  5. When these valves become weak or the veins become scarred and blocked, blood can flow backward and pool in your legs.

This is called venous insufficiency, This leads to high pressure in the lower leg veins. The increase in pressure and buildup of fluid prevents nutrients and oxygen from getting to tissues. The lack of nutrients causes cells to die, damaging the tissue, and a wound can form.

Leg swelling, heaviness, and crampingDark red, purple, brown, hardened skin (this is a sign that blood is pooling)Itching and tingling

Signs and symptoms of venous ulcers include:

Shallow sore with a red base, sometimes covered by yellow tissueUnevenly shaped bordersSurrounding skin may be shiny, tight, warm or hot, and discoloredLeg painIf the sore becomes infected, it may have a bad odor and pus may drain from the wound

Risk factors for venous ulcers include:

Varicose veinsHistory of blood clots in the legs ( deep vein thrombosis ) Blockage of the lymph vessels, which causes fluid to build up in the legsOlder age, being female, or being tallFamily history of venous insufficiencyObesityPregnancySmokingSitting or standing for a long periods of time (usually for work)Fracture of a long bone in the leg or other serious injuries, such as burns or muscle damage

Your health care provider will show you how to care for your wound. The basic instructions are:

Always keep the wound clean and bandaged to prevent infection.Your provider will tell you how often you need to change the dressing.Keep the dressing and the skin around it dry. Try not to get healthy tissue around the wound too wet. This can soften the healthy tissue, causing the wound to get bigger.Before applying a dressing, cleanse the wound thoroughly according to your provider’s instructions.Protect the skin around the wound by keeping it clean and moisturized.You will wear a compression stocking or bandages over the dressing. Your provider will show you how to apply the bandages.

To help treat a venous ulcer, the high pressure in the leg veins needs to be relieved.

Wear compression stockings or bandages every day as instructed. They help prevent blood from pooling, reduce swelling, help with healing, and reduce pain.Put your feet above your heart as often as possible. For example, you can lie down with your feet propped up on pillows.Take a walk or exercise every day. Being active helps improve blood flow.Take medicines as directed to help with healing.

If ulcers do not heal well, your provider may recommend certain procedures or surgery to improve blood flow through your veins. If you are at risk for venous ulcers, take the steps listed above under Wound Care. Also, check your feet and legs every day: the tops and bottoms, ankles, and heels.

Keep the skin of your lower legs well moisturized.Quit smoking. Smoking is bad for your blood vessels.If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar level under control. This will help you heal faster.Exercise as much as you can. Staying active helps with blood flow.Eat healthy foods and get plenty of sleep at night.Lose weight if you are overweight.Manage your blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Call your provider if there are any signs of infection, such as:

Redness, increased warmth, or swelling around the woundMore drainage than before or drainage that is yellowish or cloudyBleedingOdorFever or chillsIncreased pain

Venous leg ulcers – self-care; Venous insufficiency ulcers – self-care; Stasis leg ulcers – self-care; Varicose veins – venous ulcers – self-care; Stasis dermatitis – venous ulcer Boukovalas S, Aliano KA, Phillips LG, Norbury WB. Wound healing. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds.

Sabiston Textbook of Surgery,21st ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2022:chap 6. Hafner A, Sprecher E. Ulcers. In: Bolognia JL, Schaffer JV, Cerroni L, eds. Dermatology,4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 105. Smith SF, Duell DJ, Martin BC, Aebersold M, Gonzalez L. Wound care and dressings. In: Smith SF, Duell DJ, Martin BC, Aebersold M, Gonzalez L, eds.

Clinical Nursing Skills: Basic to Advanced Skills,9th ed. New York, NY: Pearson; 2017:chap 25. Updated by: Deepak Sudheendra, MD, MHCI, RPVI, FSIR, Founder and CEO, 360 Vascular Institute, with an expertise in Vascular Interventional Radiology & Surgical Critical Care, Columbus, OH.

What is the best thing to put on leg ulcers?

Treatment for leg ulcers – Medical treatment aims to improve blood flow to the area and promote healing of the ulcer. The type of treatment depends on whether the wound is caused by problems with veins or with arteries. Treatment for arterial ulcers is often urgent.

  1. Compression bandages must not be used, as this will reduce the blood supply even further.
  2. Surgery may be needed to clear out the blocked artery (angioplasty).
  3. In some cases, the section of blocked artery may require surgical replacement (by-pass surgery).
  4. In severe cases, the lower leg may have to be amputated.

Treatment for chronic venous leg ulceration includes:

cleaning the wound – using wet and dry dressings and ointments, or surgery to remove the dead tissuespecialised dressings – a whole range of products are available to help the various stages of wound healing. Dressings are changed less often these days, because frequent dressing changes remove healthy cells as wellocclusive (air- and water-tight) dressings – ulcers heal better when they are covered. These dressings should be changed weeklycompression treatment – boosts internal pressure, using either elasticised bandages or stockings. This is particularly effective if multiple layers are usedmedication – includes pain-relieving medication and oral antibiotics if infection is presentsupplements – there is evidence that leg ulcers may heal faster with mineral and vitamin supplements, but only if the person suffers from a deficiency. Zinc, iron and vitamin C may be usedskin graft – is a surgical procedure, where healthy skin is grafted onto the prepared wound siteskin cancer and infection– if ulcers fail to heal or if they increase in size, both these conditions will need to be ruled outhyperbaric oxygen – this is now an accepted treatment for ulcers that resist other methods of healing, such as diabetic ulcers.

What cream can I put on a leg ulcer?

Itchy skin – Some people with venous leg ulcers develop rashes with scaly and itchy skin. This is often caused by varicose eczema, which can be treated with a moisturiser (emollient) and occasionally a mild corticosteroid cream or ointment. In some cases, you may need to be referred to a dermatologist (skin specialist) for treatment.

Does salt water heal leg ulcers?

Leg Ulcers – Chiltern Skin Clinic

  • What is a venous leg ulcer?
  • A venous leg ulcer is an open sore in the skin of the lower leg due to high pressure of the blood in the leg veins.
  • What causes venous leg ulcers?

The main cause of venous leg ulcers is faulty valves inside the leg veins. These valves normally allow the blood to flow up the leg towards the heart, and prevent backward flow down the leg. If the valves are faulty, backward flow is not prevented and pressure builds up inside the veins.

  1. The persistent high pressure in the leg veins, caused by the faulty valves, damages tiny blood vessels in the skin.
  2. The skin will become dry, itchy and then inflamed.
  3. Due to the poor blood supply it doesn’t heal well, and can easily break down to leave an open sore after minimal trauma.
  4. This is how the ulcer forms.

Some people are born with weak valves. In others, the valves are damaged after a venous thrombosis (a blood clot forming within a vein). Valves tend to weaken with age.

  1. Are venous leg ulcers hereditary?
  2. Venous leg ulcers are not hereditary; however, some of the things that put you at risk of developing a venous leg ulcer do fun in families – such as poor valves or a tendency to have a blood clot.
  3. What does a venous ulcer look like and what are its symptoms?

Before the ulcer appears, you may notice your leg swelling and you may find it painful to stand for long periods. Brown spots and patches may appear on the skin, and the altered blood flow can turn the skin various shades between red and blue. Your skin may become itchy and scaly, and firm tender areas may develop under it.

The ulcer itself is an open sore. The bed of the ulcer may show bumpy, moist and red healing tissue, or may be covered in a yellowish-grey layer. Ulcers often leak fluid, the amount of which can vary. A venous ulcer can be painful, although the pain is usually relieved when the pressure is controlled by raising the leg or by wearing compression (tight and stretchy) bandages or stockings.

Some patients find that it is painful during dressing changes when their ulcer is exposed to the air. However, if your ulcer gives you severe pain, this may mean that it has other causes, such as blockages in the arteries, and you should tell your doctor.

  • How will a venous ulcer be diagnosed? The changes seen in your skin will indicate to your doctor that you have a venous leg ulcer.
  • However, it is important to check for other possible causes, especially a poor arterial circulation.
  • To do this, the doctor or nurse will feel for the pulses in your foot and may measure the blood pressure in your leg with a small ultrasound probe (“Doppler”).

Occasionally other tests are needed, such as removing a small piece of skin for microscopic examination (a biopsy), blood tests, or more specialised investigation of the circulation in an X-ray department. Can a venous leg ulcer be cured? If it is simply a venous ulcer, yes.

But if other conditions such as diseased arteries are contributing to the ulcer, it may be more difficult. How can a venous ulcer be treated? To start with, a nurse will usually clean your ulcer and the skin surrounding it. Salt water or potassium permanganate (a pale pink antiseptic solution) may be used for this.

It may be easier to do this by soaking your lower leg in the solution. Moisturisers may also be used during the washing/cleansing process in the form of oils or creams. A dressing will then be put over the open ulcer. There are many types, but one of the most common is a simple non-stick fabric dressing.

The dressing will be covered by a compression bandage or stocking, from your toes to just below your knees. These stop the damaging effects of the high pressure in the veins. Compression bandages are also known as “multilayer” or “three or four-layer” bandaging. Alternatively you may be given compression stockings.

Usually bandages are used until the ulcer has healed or nearly healed, and then stockings are used after that. The bandages will usually need to be changed and reapplied one to three times per week. Other treatments for your ulcer might include an emollient (moisturising) cream for dry skin, antibiotics for infection, and a steroid cream for any eczema (irritation or itching) on the skin surrounding the ulcer.

Sometimes the eczema around an ulcer is due to a contact allergy to something present either in the dressings that are being used to treat it, or in the creams and ointments being put on around it. Lanolin, topical antibiotics, and preservatives are commonly involved in this. If contact allergy is suspected, your doctor may suggest sending you for allergy testing (this is known as “patch testing”).

If healing is very slow, pinch skin grafting (a small, circular graft of skin) to the ulcer may be considered. In some cases, an operation on the veins helps to reduce the pressure. What can I do to help? Compression bandages or stockings work best if you exercise your leg regularly, for example by walking.

If you are less mobile, exercise your leg muscles by moving your foot up and down at the ankle. When you are sitting down, keep your legs raised by putting your feet on a stool or a chair. Don’t sleep in a chair with your legs hanging down and avoid standing up for a long time. If you smoke, you should cut down and preferably stop.

You should have a healthy balanced diet. If you are too heavy, try to lose weight. Follow the instructions carefully when you wash your stockings or bandages. Washing them at the wrong temperatures can damage the elastic. You need to make sure they are replaced regularly because over time they lose their stretch.

  • Where can I get more information?
  • Web links to detailed leaflets:

: Leg Ulcers – Chiltern Skin Clinic

Should you bathe a leg ulcer?

You can safely bathe or shower with your ulcer exposed before having your legs redressed. This also helps to remove any dry skin. You should rest with your legs elevated whenever possible. Try to exercise regularly.

Is Betadine good for leg ulcers?

Abstract – Background: The treatment of venous leg ulcers is often inadequate, because of incorrect diagnosis, overuse of systemic antibiotics and inadequate use of compression therapy. Stasis dermatitis related to chronic venous insufficiency accompanied by infected superficial ulcers must be differentiated from erysipelas, cellulitis and contact eczema.

Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of (1) topical povidone-iodine with and (2) without compression bandages, (3) to compare the efficacy of systemic antibiotics and topical antimicrobial agents to prevent the progression of superficial skin ulcers. Patients and Methods: 63 patients presenting ulcerated stasis dermatitis due to deep venous refluxes were included in the study.

The clinical stage of all patients was homogeneous determined by clinical, aetiological, anatomical and pathological classification. They were examined by taking a bacteriological swab from their ulcer area. Compression bandages were used in a total of 42 patients.

  1. Twenty-one patients with superficial infected (Staphylococcus aureus) ulcers were treated locally with povidone-iodine (Betadine ® ), and 21 patients were treated with systemic antibiotics (amoxicillin).
  2. Twenty-one patients were treated locally with Betadine but did not use compression.
  3. The end point was the time of ulcus healing.

The healing process of the ulcers was related to the impact of bacterial colonization and clinical signs of infection. Results: Compression increases the ulcer healing rate compared with no compression. Using the same local povidone-iodine (Betadine) treatment with compression bandages is more effective (82%) for ulcus healing than without compression therapy (62%).

  • The healing rate of ulcers treated with systemic antibiotics was not significantly better (85%) than that of the Betadine group.
  • Using systemic antibiotics, the relapse rate of superficial bacterial infections (impetigo, folliculitis) was significantly higher (32%) than in patients with local disinfection (11%).

Conclusion: Compression is essential in the mobilization of the interstitial lymphatic fluid from the region of stasis dermatitis. Topical disinfection and appropriate wound dressings are important to prevent wound infection. Systemic antibiotics are necessary only in systemic infections (fever, lymphangitis, lymphadenopathy, erysipelas).

  • © 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel 2006 Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer Copyright: All rights reserved.
  • No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions.

This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety.

The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements. You do not currently have access to this content.

How do you know if a leg ulcer is healing?

When should I be concerned about a leg ulcer? – We all damage our legs from time to time. It’s easy to knock our leg on a car door or shopping trolley, or sometimes an insect bite can turn into a wound or leg ulcer. These wounds should be showing signs of healing within 2 weeks of injury,

Can a leg ulcer heal on its own?

When to seek medical advice – Contact your GP if you think you have developed a venous leg ulcer. These are unlikely to get better on their own, as they usually require specialist medical treatment. You should contact your GP or leg ulcer specialist as soon as possible if you have been diagnosed with a venous leg ulcer and have signs of an infection.

You might be interested:  Can Back Pain Be Caused By Gas

What is a natural antibiotic for leg ulcers?

7 Simple and Effective Home Remedies to Cure Leg Ulcers – 1. Aloe Vera Aloe vera is a medicinal plant that is used to cure a variety of diseases. It is highly successful in the since it not only suppresses bacterial development but also prevents infection. It contains substances such as anthraquinones and hormones that are believed to have wound-healing effects.

Ingredients required: Aloe vera Instructions: Make a small incision in an aloe vera leaf. Remove the jelly-like material off the leaves using a scraper. Apply the gel immediately on your leg ulcers. How Often Should You Do This? Do this 2-3 times a day.2. Honey Honey has traditionally been used to treat wounds because of its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties.

It reduces swelling and discomfort, and its wound-healing qualities help ulcers heal faster. Honey is antimicrobial and can help prevent ulcers from becoming infected again. Ingredients required: 100% organic honey. Instructions: Apply a little amount of organic honey to your fingertips.

  • Apply it carefully to your leg ulcers and leave it on.
  • Wash it off with water after 10-15 minutes.
  • How Often Should You Do This? Do this 2-3 times a day.3.
  • Coconut Oil The amazing coconut oil has antibacterial properties as it contains fatty acids like lauric acid.
  • We are certain that by applying some coconut oil to the afflicted region, you would see positive results.

Ingredients required: 1-2 tbsp virgin coconut oil. Instructions: Apply a small amount of virgin coconut oil to your leg sores. How Often Should You Do This? Do this twice daily.4, Turmeric Turmeric contains antioxidants and anti-inflammatory components.

  • Ingredients required: 1 teaspoon of turmeric powder
  • Water

Instructions: To produce a thick paste, combine the turmeric and water. Apply the paste to the affected area and let it dry. Wash it off using warm water You can also drink a glass of hot milk with turmeric to help your body fight the infections from within.

  1. Ingredients required: 1 tablespoon of apple cider 1 to 2 tablespoons of warm water A pinch of salt
  2. A little dish towel

Instructions: Combine the apple cider vinegar and warm water in a mixing bowl. Soak a clean piece of cloth into the solution and place the same on top of the wound. Leave the solution for 10-15 minutes. How Often Should You Do This? Do it twice a day.6.

  • Ingredients required: 10 to 12 drops of tea tree oil are required.
  • Coconut oil, 30 mL

Instructions: Mix tea tree oil and coconut oil in a bowl. Apply a small amount of this solution to the affected area.

  1. The leftover mixture can be stored in a clean container for future use.
  2. 7. Gotu Kola or Centella Asiatica

Gotu kola is a tropical creeping plant mostly found in Asia and Africa. It’s used to heal open wounds, such as leg ulcers and burns. Gotu kola’s wound-healing and anti-inflammatory effects are due to the presence of substances such as Asiatic acid and Madecassic acid.

  • Ingredients required: 1 tablespoon or a handful of Gotu kola leaves
  • Water
  • Instructions: To make a thick paste, grind the Gotu kola leaves with adequate water.
  • Make a paste with this mixture and apply it to your ulcers

How Often Should You Do This? Use this paste 1-2 times per day. Following the above-mentioned tips regularly would help you treat ulcer in the long run. However, if the ulcers on your leg don’t seem to be healing or are becoming worse, you should visit a immediately.

How long does a leg ulcer take to heal?

How venous leg ulcers are treated – Most venous leg ulcers heal within 6 months if they’re treated by a healthcare professional trained in compression therapy for leg ulcers. But some ulcers may take longer to heal, and a very small number never heal. Treatment usually involves:

cleaning and dressing the woundusing compression, such as bandages or stockings, to improve the flow of blood in the legs

Antibiotics may also be used if the ulcer becomes infected, but they do not help ulcers heal. But unless the underlying cause of the ulcer is addressed, there’s a high risk of a venous leg ulcer coming back after treatment. Underlying causes could include immobility, obesity, previous DVT or varicose veins. Find out more about how venous leg ulcers are treated

Does honey heal leg ulcers?

Abstract – The management of chronic wounds such as venous ulcers is a common and long-term issue with the aging population. Non-standard treatment that is both medically and financially effective needs to be identified. Honey has been used for its healing properties for centuries and has been used to successfully heal wounds including pressure-ulcers in our care facility.

However, there is not much evidence for its use in treating venous ulcers. To this end, I trialed the use of a honey-impregnated alginate dressing on a man who had a long-standing history of venous ulcers on his leg with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of honey as an alternative treatment to the current wound management therapies.

The honey seemed to act as an effective antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and deodorizing dressing, with total healing of the ulcer achieved. This result, together with past successes with the use of honey alginate on ulcerated wounds, has led to this product becoming mainstream in the treatment of chronic wounds within our care facility.

Is Vaseline good for leg ulcers?

This website uses cookies – This website uses cookies in order to improve its performance and enhance your user experience. For more information about how we use cookies and the choices you have with respect to control of cookies, please read our privacy policy,

Name Provider Purpose Expiry Type
test_cookie Google Used to check if the user’s browser supports cookies. 1 day HTTP
_cfruid Zendesk This cookie is a part of the services provided by Cloudflare – Including load-balancing, deliverance of website content and serving DNS connection for website operators. Session HTTP
AWSALB Blueconic Registers which server-cluster is serving the visitor. This is used in context with load balancing, in order to optimize user experience. 7 days HTTP
AWSALBCORS Blueconic HMP Comunications Registers which server-cluster is serving the visitor. This is used in context with load balancing, in order to optimize user experience. 6 days HTTP
CookieConsent Cookiebot Stores the user’s cookie consent state for the current domain 1 year HTTP
incap_ses_# www.hmpgloballearningnetwork.com Preserves users states across page requests. Session HTTP
nlbi_# www.hmpgloballearningnetwork.com Used to ensure website security and fraud detection. Session HTTP
pa_enabled Solarwinds Determines the device used to access the website. This allows the website to be formatted accordingly. Persistent HTML
SSESS# www.hmpgloballearningnetwork.com Pending 23 days HTTP
visid_incap_# www.hmpgloballearningnetwork.com Preserves users states across page requests. 1 year HTTP
ZD-sendApiBlips www.hmpgloballearningnetwork.com Is required for the proper functionality of Zendesk Support. Session HTML
ZD-suid Zendesk Unique id that identifies the user’s session. Persistent HTML
_cf_bm Hubspot Vimeo This cookie is used to distinguish between humans and bots. This is beneficial for the website, in order to make valid reports on the use of their website. 1 day HTTP
bscookie LinkedIn This cookie is used to identify the visitor through an application. This allows the visitor to login to a website through their LinkedIn application for example. 1 year HTTP
li_gc LinkedIn Stores the user’s cookie consent state for the current domain 179 days HTTP
JSESSIONID New Relic Preserves users states across page requests. Session HTTP

Preference cookies enable a website to remember information that changes the way the website behaves or looks, like your preferred language or the region that you are in.

Name Provider Purpose Expiry Type
jwplayer.bandwidthEstimate JW Player Registers the website’s speed and performance. This function can be used in context with statistics and load-balancing. Persistent HTML
jwplayerLocalId JW Player Used to determine the optimal video quality based on the visitor’s device and network settings. Persistent HTML
ZD-store Zendesk Registers whether the self-service-assistant Zendesk Answer Bot has been displayed to the website user. Persistent HTML
lidc LinkedIn Registers which server-cluster is serving the visitor. This is used in context with load balancing, in order to optimize user experience. 1 day HTTP
locale Sched The cookie determines the preferred language and country-setting of the visitor – This allows the website to show content most relevant to that region and language. 2 days HTTP
ngStorage-riddleResults Riddle Used in context with the website quiz function. The cookie contains data on visitor participation, language preference and other parameters. Persistent HTML
player Vimeo Saves the user’s preferences when playing embedded videos from Vimeo. 1 year HTTP
sync_active Vimeo Contains data on visitor’s video-content preferences – This allows the website to remember parameters such as preferred volume or video quality. The service is provided by Vimeo.com. Persistent HTML

Statistic cookies help website owners to understand how visitors interact with websites by collecting and reporting information anonymously.

Name Provider Purpose Expiry Type
ping Chartbeat Collects data such as visitors’ IP address, geographical location and website navigation – This information is used for internal optimization and statistics for the website’s operator. Session Pixel
collect Google Used to send data to Google Analytics about the visitor’s device and behavior. Tracks the visitor across devices and marketing channels. Session Pixel
_hssc Hubspot Identifies if the cookie data needs to be updated in the visitor’s browser. 1 day HTTP
_hssrc Hubspot Used to recognise the visitor’s browser upon reentry on the website. Session HTTP
_hstc Hubspot Sets a unique ID for the session. This allows the website to obtain data on visitor behaviour for statistical purposes. 179 days HTTP
_cb static.chartbeat.com Collects data such as visitors’ IP address, geographical location and website navigation – This information is used for internal optimization and statistics for the website’s operator. 1 year HTTP
_cb static.chartbeat.com Collects data such as visitors’ IP address, geographical location and website navigation – This information is used for internal optimization and statistics for the website’s operator. Persistent HTML
_cb_expires static.chartbeat.com This cookie is used in context with HTML local storage, this sets an expiry date/time for the _cb tracker, which makes it function like a cookie. Persistent HTML
_cb_svref static.chartbeat.com Collects data such as visitors’ IP address, geographical location and website navigation – This information is used for internal optimization and statistics for the website’s operator. Persistent HTML
_cb_svref_expires static.chartbeat.com This cookie is used in context with HTML local storage, this sets an expiry date/time for the _cb_sverf, which makes it function like a cookie. Persistent HTML
_cbt static.chartbeat.com Collects data such as visitors’ IP address, geographical location and website navigation – This information is used for internal optimization and statistics for the website’s operator. Session HTTP
_chartbeat2 static.chartbeat.com Collects data on the user’s visits to the website, such as which pages have been read. 1 year HTTP
_ga Google Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website. 399 days HTTP
_ga_# Google Used by Google Analytics to collect data on the number of times a user has visited the website as well as dates for the first and most recent visit. 399 days HTTP
_gat Google Used by Google Analytics to throttle request rate 1 day HTTP
_gid Google Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website. 1 day HTTP
formstack.analytics.viewed-form.# www.hmpgloballearningnetwork.com Pending Persistent HTML
fsFonts www.hmpgloballearningnetwork.com This cookie contains an ID string on the current session. This contains non-personal information on what subpages the visitor enters – this information is used to optimize the visitor’s experience. Session HTML
hubspotutk Hubspot Sets a unique ID for the session. This allows the website to obtain data on visitor behaviour for statistical purposes. 179 days HTTP
pa Solarwinds Registers the website’s speed and performance. This function can be used in context with statistics and load-balancing. Persistent HTML
ZD-buid Zendesk Unique id that identifies the user on recurring visits. Persistent HTML
AnalyticsSyncHistory LinkedIn Used in connection with data-synchronization with third-party analysis service. 29 days HTTP
_hjAbsoluteSessionInProgress Sched This cookie is used to count how many times a website has been visited by different visitors – this is done by assigning the visitor an ID, so the visitor does not get registered twice. 1 day HTTP
_hjFirstSeen Sched This cookie is used to determine if the visitor has visited the website before, or if it is a new visitor on the website. 1 day HTTP
_hjIncludedInSessionSample_# Sched Collects statistics on the visitor’s visits to the website, such as the number of visits, average time spent on the website and what pages have been read. 1 day HTTP
_hjSession_# Sched Collects statistics on the visitor’s visits to the website, such as the number of visits, average time spent on the website and what pages have been read. 1 day HTTP
_hjSessionUser_# Sched Collects statistics on the visitor’s visits to the website, such as the number of visits, average time spent on the website and what pages have been read. 1 year HTTP
_hjTLDTest Sched Registers statistical data on users’ behaviour on the website. Used for internal analytics by the website operator. Session HTTP
personalization_id Twitter Inc. This cookie is set by Twitter – The cookie allows the visitor to share content from the website onto their Twitter profile. 399 days HTTP
vuid Vimeo Collects data on the user’s visits to the website, such as which pages have been read. 399 days HTTP

Marketing cookies are used to track visitors across websites. The intention is to display ads that are relevant and engaging for the individual user and thereby more valuable for publishers and third party advertisers.

Name Provider Purpose Expiry Type
uuid2 Appnexus Registers a unique ID that identifies a returning user’s device. The ID is used for targeted ads. 3 months HTTP
track/cmf/generic The Trade Desk Presents the user with relevant content and advertisement. The service is provided by third-party advertisement hubs, which facilitate real-time bidding for advertisers. Session Pixel
IDE Google Used by Google DoubleClick to register and report the website user’s actions after viewing or clicking one of the advertiser’s ads with the purpose of measuring the efficacy of an ad and to present targeted ads to the user. 1 year HTTP
pagead/landing Google Collects data on visitor behaviour from multiple websites, in order to present more relevant advertisement – This also allows the website to limit the number of times that they are shown the same advertisement. Session Pixel
fr Meta Platforms, Inc. Used by Facebook to deliver a series of advertisement products such as real time bidding from third party advertisers. 3 months HTTP
ads/ga-audiences Google Used by Google AdWords to re-engage visitors that are likely to convert to customers based on the visitor’s online behaviour across websites. Session Pixel
NID Google Registers a unique ID that identifies a returning user’s device. The ID is used for targeted ads. 6 months HTTP
pagead/1p-user-list/11090462504 Google Pending Session Pixel
pagead/1p-user-list/968588592 Google Pending Session Pixel
AVPUID Advert Serve Used to identify the visitor across visits and devices. This allows the website to present the visitor with relevant advertisement – The service is provided by third party advertisement hubs, which facilitate real-time bidding for advertisers. 1 year HTTP
BCSessionID Blueconic HMP Comunications Gathers information on the user’s behavior, preferences and other personal data, which is sent to a third-party marketing and analysis service, for optimization of the website’s advertisement, analysis and general traffic. 399 days HTTP
BCTempID Blueconic HMP Comunications Gathers information on the user’s behavior, preferences and other personal data, which is sent to a third-party marketing and analysis service, for optimization of the website’s advertisement, analysis and general traffic. 1 day HTTP
_utmvc www.hmpgloballearningnetwork.com Collects information on user behaviour on multiple websites. This information is used in order to optimize the relevance of advertisement on the website. 1 day HTTP
_cb_svref static.chartbeat.com This cookie is used to collect information on a visitor. This information will become an ID string with information on a specific visitor – ID information strings can be used to target groups with similar preferences, or can be used by third-party domains or ad-exchanges. 1 day HTTP
_chartbeat2 static.chartbeat.com Used by the web analytics company Chartbeat to register whether the user has visited the website before. Persistent HTML
_chartbeat2_expires static.chartbeat.com Used by the web analytics company Chartbeat to register whether the user has visited the website before. Persistent HTML
_chartbeat4 www.hmpgloballearningnetwork.com Used by the web analytics company Chartbeat to register whether the user has visited the website before. 1 day HTTP
_fbp Meta Platforms, Inc. Used by Facebook to deliver a series of advertisement products such as real time bidding from third party advertisers. 3 months HTTP
_gcl_au Google Used by Google AdSense for experimenting with advertisement efficiency across websites using their services. 3 months HTTP
_sess MED Snippets Collects information on user preferences and/or interaction with web-campaign content – This is used on CRM-campaign-platform used by website owners for promoting events or products. 1 day HTTP
AVP_UUID Advert Serve Collects data on user behaviour and interaction in order to optimize the website and make advertisement on the website more relevant. Persistent HTML
dmd-ahk MED Snippets Collects information on user behaviour on multiple websites. This information is used in order to optimize the relevance of advertisement on the website. 1 day HTTP
dmd-ahk MED Snippets Collects information on user behaviour on multiple websites. This information is used in order to optimize the relevance of advertisement on the website. Session HTML
dmd-sid MED Snippets Collects information on user behaviour on multiple websites. This information is used in order to optimize the relevance of advertisement on the website. 1 day HTTP
dmd-vid MED Snippets Collects information on user behaviour on multiple websites. This information is used in order to optimize the relevance of advertisement on the website. 1 day HTTP
wooTracker Woopra Sets a unique ID for the visitor, that allows third party advertisers to target the visitor with relevant advertisement. This pairing service is provided by third party advertisement hubs, which facilitates real-time bidding for advertisers. 399 days HTTP
_ptq.gif Hubspot Sends data to the marketing platform Hubspot about the visitor’s device and behaviour. Tracks the visitor across devices and marketing channels. Session Pixel
bcookie LinkedIn Used by the social networking service, LinkedIn, for tracking the use of embedded services. 1 year HTTP
li_sugr LinkedIn Collects data on user behaviour and interaction in order to optimize the website and make advertisement on the website more relevant. 3 months HTTP
UserMatchHistory LinkedIn Ensures visitor browsing-security by preventing cross-site request forgery. This cookie is essential for the security of the website and visitor. 29 days HTTP
s-DMDSESSID MED Snippets Collects data on the user across websites – This data is used to make advertisement more relevant. Session HTTP
WIDGET::local::assignments Soundcloud Used by audio-platform SoundCloud to implement, measure and improve their embedded content/service on the website – The collection of data also includes visitors’ interaction with embedded content/service. This can be used for statistics or marketing purposes. Persistent HTML
WIDGET::local::broadcast Soundcloud Used by audio-platform SoundCloud to implement, measure and improve their embedded content/service on the website – The collection of data also includes visitors’ interaction with embedded content/service. This can be used for statistics or marketing purposes. Persistent HTML
ep# SurveyMonkey Saves user states across page requests when completing a web-based survey. 1 day HTTP
muc_ads Twitter Inc. Collects data on user behaviour and interaction in order to optimize the website and make advertisement on the website more relevant. 399 days HTTP
nWC1Uzs7EI YouTube Pending Session HTML
VISITOR_INFO1_LIVE YouTube Tries to estimate the users’ bandwidth on pages with integrated YouTube videos. 179 days HTTP
YSC YouTube Registers a unique ID to keep statistics of what videos from YouTube the user has seen. Session HTTP
ytidb::LAST_RESULT_ENTRY_KEY YouTube Stores the user’s video player preferences using embedded YouTube video Persistent HTML
yt-remote-cast-available YouTube Stores the user’s video player preferences using embedded YouTube video Session HTML
yt-remote-cast-installed YouTube Stores the user’s video player preferences using embedded YouTube video Session HTML
yt-remote-connected-devices YouTube Stores the user’s video player preferences using embedded YouTube video Persistent HTML
yt-remote-device-id YouTube Stores the user’s video player preferences using embedded YouTube video Persistent HTML
yt-remote-fast-check-period YouTube Stores the user’s video player preferences using embedded YouTube video Session HTML
yt-remote-session-app YouTube Stores the user’s video player preferences using embedded YouTube video Session HTML
yt-remote-session-name YouTube Stores the user’s video player preferences using embedded YouTube video Session HTML

Unclassified cookies are cookies that we are in the process of classifying, together with the providers of individual cookies.

Name Provider Purpose Expiry Type
dmd-signal-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-# MED Snippets Pending 1 day HTTP
firstHit Google Pending Session HTML
s-dmd-id-x MED Snippets Pending Session HTTP
debug Sched Pending Session HTTP
embed Sched Pending 2 days HTTP
iframe Sched Pending 2 days HTTP
lastday Sched Pending 2 days HTTP
mobileoff Sched Pending 2 days HTTP
pageView Sched Pending 2 days HTTP
view Sched Pending 2 days HTTP

Cookies are small text files that can be used by websites to make a user’s experience more efficient. The law states that we can store cookies on your device if they are strictly necessary for the operation of this site. For all other types of cookies we need your permission.

  • This site uses different types of cookies.
  • Some cookies are placed by third party services that appear on our pages.
  • You can at any time change or withdraw your consent from the Cookie Declaration on our website.
  • Learn more about who we are, how you can contact us and how we process personal data in our Privacy Policy.

Skip to main content Q&A Given the potentially serious nature of venous ulcers in the lower extremity, our expert panelists take a closer look at key risk factors and share their treatment approaches to this condition. Drawing from their experience, they also discuss topical treatments, the use of bioengineered skin substitutes and surgical procedures.

Q: What risk factors predispose patients to the development of lower extremity venous ulcers? A: Mark Hirko, MD, and Lawrence Karlock, DPM, agree that risks include prior deep venous thromboses (DVT), morbid obesity, lower extremity trauma and chronic venous hypertension, which can lead to perforator vein incompetence.

Allen Holloway, MD, agrees and emphasizes that venous hypertension is the primary factor associated with the development of venous ulcers. He notes this may be secondary to previous DVT, either deep, superficial or perforator vein incompetence or severe edema from the dependent position.

  1. According to Dr.
  2. Hirko, other less common risk factors include changes in the progesterone-estrogen ratio, pregnancy, increased intraabdominal pressure and chronic phlebitis leading to venous hypertension.
  3. Q: What is your traditional treatment protocol in managing these ulcers? A: After an in-depth patient history and physical exam, Drs.

Hirko and Holloway will proceed with a venous duplex study of the lower extremities and, based upon the severity and/or location of the ulceration, include compression as a first-line treatment. Drs. Holloway and Karlock agree that compression is the most important aspect of treating venous ulcers.

  1. Simple forms of compression include an elastic bandage (ACE) wrap or a compression stocking, according to Dr. Holloway.
  2. However, he says simple compression may not be practical in heavily draining wounds.
  3. In these cases, Dr.
  4. Holloway will employ an Unna’s boot or a multilayer compression bandage.
  5. He emphasizes that these modalities, which are commonly changed weekly, provide compression and absorb drainage.

When treating serious, chronic cases with extensive lower extremity ulcerations and/or necrotic skin, Dr. Hirko combines judicious debridement with compression. He says the compression could include ace wraps with skin moisturizers, the traditional Unna’s boot and the newer multilayer compression boots.

Drs. Holloway and Karlock emphasize the importance of elevating the involved legs as much as possible in order to decrease the venous hypertension and edema. In severe cases, Dr. Holloway says using a venous compression pump can be a useful adjunct. When healing has occurred, Drs. Karlock and Holloway advocate the use of compression stockings in order to prevent recurrence.

Q: What topical products do you prefer to use for these ulcers? A: When drying is a problem in smaller ulcers, Dr. Holloway says he frequently uses a calcium alginate or newer silver-containing dressing, and applies a vaseline gauze dressing over it in order to keep the wound moist and protect the surrounding skin.

If the wound has extensive moisture, bordering on maceration, Dr. Hirko considers using sheets of Kaltostat. He says this seaweed-based agent helps dry the wound, remove excessive fluid and provides a moist hydrogel layer in the same setting. Dr. Karlock agrees, adding that he prefers using Aquacel or Kaltostat on highly draining venous wounds.

When using these modalities, Dr. Karlock notes that he will first apply an Adaptic dressing, directly to the wound. If the wound has extensive contamination, Dr. Hirko recommends using an iodine-based gel such as Iodosorb. If the wound is somewhat dry and nearly healed, he says using hydrogel-type wound products is appropriate.

When extensive chemical debridement is called for, Dr. Hirko says he will use Accuzyme. When it comes to irritated, dry skin or a necrotic ulceration, Dr. Hirko says you can perform gentle debridement with a combination of Santyl and Polysporin powder. Q: Do you see any role for bioengineered skin substitutes in the treatment of these ulcers? A: When using bioengineered skin substitutes, Dr.

Holloway says one should ensure meticulous preparation of the wound bed with excellent underlying tissue. Dr. Hirko concurs. If the ulcerations are chronic, clean, free of bacterial contamination and the patient has no suitable harvest sites for split thickness skin graft, Dr.

  1. Hirko says it is appropriate to use bioengineered skin substitutes as an “intermediary step” to allow for epithelialization to occur. Dr.
  2. Hirko adds that you can also apply these skin substitutes in the office, which alleviates the need for a possible hospital stay. Dr.
  3. Arlock says he has used Apligraf with some success in managing recurrent lower leg venous ulcerations.

Noting that most of these patients are not neuropathic, Dr. Karlock uses the Mepitel dressing to adhere the graft to the wound as opposed to staples or sutures. While Dr. Holloway concedes bioengineered skin substitutes have shown moderate success for some, he maintains that the underlying venous hypertension “results in limited longevity.” Dr.

Holloway emphasizes that there are no published clinical trials that show long-term success in using these modalities to treat venous ulcers. Q: What surgical procedures do you advocate for the recurrent venous ulcer? A: When it comes to treating chronic venous ulcers, surgical procedures generally have limited proven value, according to Dr.

Holloway. “Unless you can correct the underlying venous hypertension, these ulcers are frequently difficult to heal and commonly recur,” notes Dr. Holloway. If the patient has saphenofemoral or saphenopopliteal venous incompetency, Dr. Hirko says ligation at these levels would be appropriate along with judicious debridement of the ulcer.

  • Autolytic debridement is more common for venous ulcers, according to Dr.
  • Holloway, who points out that sharp debridement is very painful and often must be done in the operating room.
  • When dealing with large ulcerations, Dr.
  • Hirko says split thickness skin grafts may be indicated along with rotational skin grafts if necessary.

However, Dr. Holloway cautions that skin grafts “frequently have poor take” due to the uncorrected and underlying venous hypertension and edema. If one does opt for skin grafts, Dr. Holloway says you must ensure optimal pre- and postoperative care, including leg elevation, in order for the procedure to be successful.

  • Reconstructive procedures, such as venous banding, vein transposition and vein interposition, are usually only done in large specialized centers, according to Dr. Holloway.
  • Even when the procedures are performed in these centers, Dr.
  • Holloway says the success rate is not high.
  • One emerging option is endoscopic perforator ligation surgery (SEPS).

Dr. Hirko says one can perform this procedure as a stand-alone surgical intervention or in combination with ligation of veins with incompetent proximal valves. Several groups have shown that the SEPS procedure is effective when it has been demonstrated that incompetent perforating veins are feeding into the ulcer.

Final Notes In conclusion, Drs. Hirko and Holloway caution that venous ulcerations have a mixed etiology and emphasize the importance of measuring arterial flow via examination or noninvasive vascular testing. Dr. Hirko says this testing is essential prior to implementing any extensive compression as the ulcerations may become worse or the patient could lose the affected limb.

Dr. Hirko is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine. He is Chief of the Division of Peripheral Vascular Surgery and the Director of the General Surgery Residency Program at the Northside Medical Center, Forum Health in Youngstown, Ohio.

Dr. Holloway is the Director of Research within the Department of Surgery at the Maricopa Medical Center in Phoenix. Dr. Karlock (pictured) is a Fellow of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons and practices in Austintown, Ohio. He is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board for WOUNDS, a Compendium of Clinical Research and Practice.

Advertisement

Is it OK to put salt directly on an ulcer?

How to cure mouth ulcers naturally – There are a few effective ways to cure mouth ulcers naturally, with almost all of them free or extremely cheap.

Try not to touch the ulcer —touching the ulcer can impede the healing process, and also spread an infection to another area. Drink lots of water —water is crucial to our immune system, and will help to speed up the healing process. Rinse your mouth regularly with slightly salty water —mix half a teaspoon of salt in a glass of warm water, and rinse your mouth for a few minutes at a time. The salt helps to reduce acid levels in your mouth, which makes it harder for bacteria to grow and quickens healing as a result. Don’t put salt directly onto the ulcer though, as it’s too harsh and will hurt like hell. Keep your mouth clean —this is an obvious one. Keep your fingers out of your mouth to reduce the amount of dirt and bacteria, and create an environment that is favourable for healing. Avoid sour foods —sour foods will increase acidity levels in your mouth, which encourages the growth of bacteria. Avoid spicy foods —spicy foods may burn the inside of your mouth (including your ulcer) and will slow the healing process.

Does rubbing salt into an ulcer work?

How to treat Mouth ulcers and Canker Sores? – So long as they aren’t constantly being rubbed against or repeatedly bitten down on, ulcers should go away by themselves. However the pain and interference with eating and talking that mouth ulcers and Canker Sores cause can mean that you want them gone as soon as possible.

  • Here is how its done: 1) Ulcers will disappear faster if they are not irritated or interfered with,
  • It therefore may be a good idea to avoid chewing on the side of the mouth where you have an ulcer (if possible).
  • Similarly you should try and to resist the urge to play with your ulcer with your fingers or tongue.2) You can use over the counter painkillers to reduce the pain of your ulcer or canker sore.

The reduced pain should also decrease your urge to play with your ulcer. This should promote healing further. Ideally you want to be using painkillers with an anti-inflammatory quality. Anti-inflammatories fight infection as well as reduce pain, therefore making your ulcer or Canker Sore heal faster. Anti-inflammatories are best for reducing most painful oral health issues 3) Inflammation can be reduced by rinsing the ulcer with warm salty water. This is because salt-water is a mild anti-septic. It can kill the harmful inflammation causing bacteria without doing any damage to the infected tissue itself. A Saltwater solution will gently disinfect your mouth ulcer The salt water solution may taste unpleasant but it should not sting when coming into contact with your ulcer. Some people assume that it will have the effect of “rubbing salt into an open wound” but this is simply not the case.

What foods help heal leg ulcers?

Zinc-rich foods – Red meat, fish, shellfish, chicken, eggs, milk and milk products, bread, cereal, green vegetables and pulses How much should I have? – Aim for one portion of a zinc-rich food per day. Iron Promotes cell growth and ensures a good supply of nutrient-rich blood to the wound site.

Should you keep an ulcer wet or dry?

Abstract – Wound dressings: ulcer dressings should create and maintain a moist environment on the ulcer surface. It has been shown that in an ulcer with a hard crust and desiccated bed, the healing process is significantly slowed and sometimes completely blocked so favouring infection, inflammation and pain.

  • In contrast a moist environment promotes autolytic debridement, angiogenesis and the more rapid formation of granulation tissue, favours keratinocytes migration and accelerates healing of wounds.
  • Apart from these common characteristics, wound dressings are completely different in other aspects and must be used according to the ulcer stage.

In necrotic ulcers, autolytic debridement by means of hydrogel and hydrocolloids or with enzymatic paste is preferred. In case of largely exuding wounds alginate or hydrofibre are indicated. When bleeding occurs alginate is indicated due to its haemostatic power.

  • Where ulcers are covered by granulation tissue, polyurethane foams are preferred.
  • When infection coexists antiseptics are necessary: dressing containing silver or iodine with large antibacterial spectrum have proved to be very effective.
  • In the epithelization stage polyurethane films or membranes, thin hydrocolloids or collagen based dressings are very useful to favour advancement of the healing wound edge.

Despite these considerations, a Cochrane review failed to find advantages for any dressing type compared with low-adherent dressings applied beneath compression. Surgical debridement and grafting of wounds, negative wound pressure treatment: surgical and hydrosurgical debridement are indicated in large, necrotic and infected wounds as these treatments are able to get rid of necrotic, infected tissue very quickly in a single surgical session, thereby significantly accelerating wound bed preparation and healing time.

What causes leg ulcers not to heal?

What causes leg ulcers? – Causes of leg ulcers include:

Chronic venous insufficiency: Chronic venous insufficiency occurs when faulty valves in leg veins allow blood to flow backward into the leg where it pools. If you develop high blood pressure in the leg veins, tiny blood vessels ( capillaries ) can burst, causing inflammation, itching and dry skin. Leg ulcers develop when the skin breaks open. Diabetes: High blood sugar levels from diabetes can cause fat deposits to form inside blood vessels, causing them to narrow. Reduced blood flow can cause nerve damage or diabetic neuropathy, With these nerve problems, you may not be able to feel a leg ulcer or know it’s there. Diabetes also slows the wound healing process. Peripheral artery disease (PAD): This condition causes plaque (fatty deposits) to build up in the arteries ( atherosclerosis ). The blood vessels in the leg become narrow, leading to poor blood circulation. The reduced blood flow slows the healing of leg ulcers. People with diabetes are more likely to develop PAD. High blood pressure: Chronic, poorly controlled high blood pressure (hypertension) can cause an extremely painful ulcer on the lower leg called a Martorell ulcer. High blood pressure causes the capillaries in the skin to become narrow, cutting off the blood supply to the skin. The skin can die, forming a leg ulcer.

How serious are leg ulcers?

About leg ulcers Leg ulcers are unhealed sores or open wounds on the legs. Without treatment, these types of ulcers can keep recurring. This condition is most commonly caused by poor circulation, though it may be attributed to a variety of ailments. These wounds are also more common in women, but they can affect both men and women of any age.

poor blood circulation diabetes hypertension (high blood pressure) heart disease high cholesterol kidney disease increased pressure in the legssmokinginfections

Varicose veins, which are swollen and visible veins, are frequently associated with leg ulcers. And often, leg ulcers are a complication of untreated varicose veins. However, the two conditions aren’t always found together. The symptoms of leg ulcers can vary depending on their exact cause.

open sorespus in the affected areapain in the affected areaincreasing wound size leg swelling enlarged veinsgeneralized pain or heaviness in the legs

Your doctor will perform a physical examination combined with testing to diagnose your leg ulcers and determine their exact cause. Often times, your doctor will be able to differentiate between a leg ulcer and regular sore just by looking at it. They’ll likely order a variety of tests to determine the right treatment plan, including:

CT scan MRI scannoninvasive vascular studies using ultrasound X-rays

Treating leg ulcers is crucial to relieve pain, prevent infection, and to stop the wound from growing in size. If pus is draining from your ulcer, you likely have an infection. Infections are treated with antibiotics to avoid further complications. Compression bandages are also used to help ease swelling, close the wound, and prevent infection.

  • Your doctor may also prescribe an ointment to apply to the ulcer.
  • In severe cases, your doctor may order orthotics or braces to help you walk better while preventing future ulcers.
  • Pentoxifylline may be prescribed to improve the circulation in your legs.
  • Your doctor may also recommend aspirin to prevent blood clots in the legs, but it’s important that you don’t start any medication without first consulting your doctor.

Along with medical treatment, your doctor may recommend home remedies to ease discomfort and assist in healing. First, it’s important to keep any wounds clean to prevent infection. Wash the wound with mild soap and water daily. Also, change any bandages and dressings at least once daily to keep the area dry, so it can heal.

wearing good walking shoesgetting regular, mild to moderate exerciseelevating your legs during rest periods

Never use home or alternative methods in lieu of traditional medical treatment without checking with your doctor. These remedies may very well be beneficial, but they can also aggravate the condition depending on the preparation and stage of your ulcers. Since poor circulation is the most common cause of leg ulcers, it makes sense to control conditions that can cause poor circulation, like:

hypertensiondiabetes Raynaud’s disease

Staying well with a healthy diet and regular exercise can reduce your weight, thereby decreasing your risk of leg ulcers. Decreasing your sodium intake is also important. You can do this by:

using fresh foods, not packagedreading nutrition labels and checking for sodium content

Also, smoking increases your risk for ulcers. If you smoke, seek help to quit. In most cases, treatment is effective in easing the symptoms of leg ulcers. If they’re not treated in a timely fashion, it’s possible that a leg ulcer can become infected. In severe cases, infection can spread to the bone. It’s essential to see your doctor as soon as you notice symptoms.

Is Betadine good for leg ulcers?

Abstract – Background: The treatment of venous leg ulcers is often inadequate, because of incorrect diagnosis, overuse of systemic antibiotics and inadequate use of compression therapy. Stasis dermatitis related to chronic venous insufficiency accompanied by infected superficial ulcers must be differentiated from erysipelas, cellulitis and contact eczema.

Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of (1) topical povidone-iodine with and (2) without compression bandages, (3) to compare the efficacy of systemic antibiotics and topical antimicrobial agents to prevent the progression of superficial skin ulcers. Patients and Methods: 63 patients presenting ulcerated stasis dermatitis due to deep venous refluxes were included in the study.

The clinical stage of all patients was homogeneous determined by clinical, aetiological, anatomical and pathological classification. They were examined by taking a bacteriological swab from their ulcer area. Compression bandages were used in a total of 42 patients.

  • Twenty-one patients with superficial infected (Staphylococcus aureus) ulcers were treated locally with povidone-iodine (Betadine ® ), and 21 patients were treated with systemic antibiotics (amoxicillin).
  • Twenty-one patients were treated locally with Betadine but did not use compression.
  • The end point was the time of ulcus healing.

The healing process of the ulcers was related to the impact of bacterial colonization and clinical signs of infection. Results: Compression increases the ulcer healing rate compared with no compression. Using the same local povidone-iodine (Betadine) treatment with compression bandages is more effective (82%) for ulcus healing than without compression therapy (62%).

  1. The healing rate of ulcers treated with systemic antibiotics was not significantly better (85%) than that of the Betadine group.
  2. Using systemic antibiotics, the relapse rate of superficial bacterial infections (impetigo, folliculitis) was significantly higher (32%) than in patients with local disinfection (11%).

Conclusion: Compression is essential in the mobilization of the interstitial lymphatic fluid from the region of stasis dermatitis. Topical disinfection and appropriate wound dressings are important to prevent wound infection. Systemic antibiotics are necessary only in systemic infections (fever, lymphangitis, lymphadenopathy, erysipelas).

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel 2006 Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions.

This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety.

The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements. You do not currently have access to this content.

What vitamin is good for leg ulcers?

Supplements – What Are Star Ratings? Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by some in the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

  1. For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals.
  2. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings.
  3. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence.

For a supplement, little scientific support.

Supplement Why
2 Stars Aloe Apply gel on gauze or dressings daily Aloe has been used historically to improve wound healing and studies have shown it to be effective in healing skin ulcers. Aloe vera has been used historically to improve wound healing and contains several constituents that may be important for this effect. A group of three patients who had chronic skin ulcerations for 5, 7, and 15 years, respectively, had a rapid reduction in ulcer size after the application of aloe gel on gauze bandages to the ulcers, according to a preliminary report. A controlled study found most patients with pressure ulcers had complete healing after applying an aloe hydrogel dressing to the ulcers every day for ten weeks. However, this result was not significantly better than that achieved with a moist saline gauze dressing. The amorphous hydrogel dressing used in the above study and derived from the aloe plant (Carrasyn Gel Wound Dressing, Carrington Laboratories, Irving, TX) is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the management of mild to moderate skin ulcers.
2 Stars Diosmin and Hesperidin 900 mg per day of diosmin and 100 mg per day of hesperidin One trial found that a combination of the flavonoids diosmin and hesperidin promoted healing of venous leg ulcers. Hydroxyethylrutosides (related flavonoids) may also help. A double-blind trial found that a combination of 900 mg per day of diosmin and 100 mg per day of hesperidin, two members of the flavonoid family, resulted in significantly greater healing of venous leg ulcers after two months. Related flavonoids known as hydroxyethylrutosides have also been investigated for venous ulcer healing. While one controlled study reported significant additional benefit when 2,000 mg per day of hydroxyethylrutosides were added to compression stocking therapy, another double-blind trial using 1,000 mg per day found no effect on ulcer healing; a second double-blind trial found no effect of 1,000 mg per day hydroxyethylrutosides on the prevention of venous ulcer recurrences.
2 Stars Essential Fatty Acids Topical Refer to label instructions In one study, topically applied essential fatty acids significantly lessened pressure ulcers and improved skin hydration and elasticity in malnourished people, who frequently develop ulcers. Pressure ulcers and diabetic ulcers frequently develop in malnourished and/or institutionalized people. A double-blind study of malnourished people compared topical application of 20 ml of a solution containing essential fatty acids (EFAs) and linoleic acid extracted from sunflower oil with a control solution containing topical mineral oil. Each solution was applied to the skin three times per day. Compared with the control solution, the solution containing EFAs significantly reduced the incidence of pressure ulcers and improved the hydration and elasticity of the skin.
2 Stars Evening Primrose Oil 1,500 mg with each meal A preliminary report suggested that evening primrose oil improves blood flow to the legs and heals or reduces the size of venous leg ulcers. A preliminary report suggested that evening primrose oil improves blood flow to the legs and heals or reduces the size of venous leg ulcers. No controlled research has further investigated this claim.
2 Stars Folic Acid Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner Large amounts of folic acid given both orally and by injection could promote healing of chronic skin ulcers due to poor circulation. An older preliminary report suggested that large amounts of folic acid given both orally and by injection could promote healing of chronic skin ulcers due to poor circulation. No controlled research has further investigated this claim.
2 Stars Gotu Kola Apply an ointment or powder containing 1 to 2% herbal extract daily Gotu kola extracts may be used topically to help speed wound healing. Gotu kola (Centella asiatica) extracts are sometimes used topically to help speed wound healing. Test tube studies have found that extracts of gotu kola high in the active triterpene constituents asiaticosides, madecassoides, asiatic acids, and madecassic acids increase collagen synthesis. An animal study found that topical application of asiaticoside isolated from gotu kola, used in a 0.2% solution, improved healing in nonulcer skin wounds. An overview of three small human clinical trials suggests that topical use of an ointment or powder containing a gotu kola extract high in the active triterpene compounds may speed wound healing in people with slow-healing skin ulcers. These studies used either a topical ointment with a 1% extract concentration or a powder with a 2% extract concentration. People in these studies were typically treated with intramuscular injections of either isolated asiaticosides or the mixed triterpenes three times per week while using the topical ointment or powder.
2 Stars Hyaluronic Acid Apply a gel containing a partial benzyl ester derivative of hyaluronan under compression bandaging daily A trial found that topical application of a hyaluronic acid compound with compression bandaging was significantly better than bandaging alone for healing chronic venous skin ulcers. A controlled trial found that topical application of a hyaluronic acid compound with compression bandaging was significantly better than bandaging alone for healing chronic venous skin ulcers.No research has investigated whether oral hyaluronic acid supplements might be similarly effective.
2 Stars Pine Bark Extract (Pycnogenol) 150 mg per day orally, along with topical application of 100 mg daily In a controlled study, symptoms of diabetic skin ulcers improved in those treated with standard medications plus oral and topical Pycnogenol. In a controlled study, diabetic skin ulcers were treated with standard medications plus either 150 mg per day of Pycnogenol orally, 100 mg Pycnogenol topically applied to the ulcers daily, or a combination of oral and topical Pycnogenol treatment. All treatments produced complete healing in more subjects after six weeks compared with a control group receiving no Pycnogenol treatment, but the group receiving oral and topical Pycnogenol had the greatest reductions in ulcer size and in pain and other associated symptoms. In a small controlled study of venous skin ulcers, the same combination of oral and topical Pycnogenol was more effective for healing than oral Pycnogenol treatment alone.
2 Stars Vitamin C 1,000 mg daily Supplementing with vitamin C may help prevent skin ulcers and speed healing. Antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and glutathione are depleted in healing skin tissue. One animal study found that vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) applied to the skin shortened the healing time of skin ulcers. Another animal study reported that administration of oral vitamin E before skin lesions were introduced into the skin prevented some of the tissue damage associated with the development of pressure ulcers. A controlled human trial found that 400 IU of vitamin E daily improved the results of skin graft surgery for chronic venous ulcers. No further research has investigated the potential benefit of vitamin E for skin ulcers. Animal research has suggested that vitamin C may help prevent skin ulcers, and in a preliminary study, elderly patients with pressure ulcers had lower blood levels of vitamin C than did ulcer-free patients. Supplementation with vitamin C (3 grams per day) increased the speed of healing of leg ulcers in patients with a blood disorder called thalassemia, according to a double-blind study. And while a double-blind trial of surgical patients with pressure ulcers found that supplementation with 500 mg of vitamin C twice a day accelerated ulcer healing, a similar double-blind trial found no difference in the effectiveness of either 20 mg per day or 1,000 mg per day of vitamin C.
2 Stars Vitamin E Oral 400 IU daily Antioxidants, such as vitamin E, are depleted in healing skin tissue. Studies have shown that vitamin E taken orally to be effective at preventing skin ulcers and promoting healing. Antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and glutathione are depleted in healing skin tissue. One animal study found that vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) applied to the skin shortened the healing time of skin ulcers. Another animal study reported that administration of oral vitamin E before skin lesions were introduced into the skin prevented some of the tissue damage associated with the development of pressure ulcers. A controlled human trial found that 400 IU of vitamin E daily improved the results of skin graft surgery for chronic venous ulcers. No further research has investigated the potential benefit of vitamin E for skin ulcers.
2 Stars Zinc Take under medical supervision: 50 mg of zinc (plus 1 to 3 mg of copper daily, to prevent depletion) and apply zinc-containing bandages or tape to the area Supplementing with zinc may help some types of skin ulcer by facilitating tissue growth. Zinc plays an important role in tissue growth processes important for skin ulcer healing. One study reported that patients with pressure ulcers had lower blood levels of zinc and iron than did patients without pressure ulcers, and preliminary reports suggested zinc supplements could help some types of skin ulcer. Supplementation with 150 mg of zinc per day improved healing in a preliminary study of elderly patients suffering from chronic leg ulcers. Double-blind trials using 135 to 150 mg of zinc daily have shown improvement only in patients with low blood zinc levels, and no improvement in leg ulcer healing. A double-blind trial of 150 mg zinc per day in people with skin ulcers due to sickle cell anemia found that the healing rate was almost three times faster in the zinc group than in the placebo group after six months. Lastly, a preliminary study of patients with skin ulcers due to leprosy found that 50 mg of zinc per day in addition to anti-leprosy medication resulted in complete healing in most patients within 6 to 12 weeks. Long-term zinc supplementation at these levels should be accompanied by supplements of copper and perhaps calcium, iron, and magnesium. Large amounts of zinc (over 50 mg per day) should only be taken under the supervision of a doctor. Topically applied zinc using zinc-containing bandages has improved healing of leg ulcers in double-blind studies of both zinc-deficient and elderly individuals. Most controlled comparison studies have reported that these bandages are no more effective than other bandages used in the conventional treatment of skin ulcers, but one controlled trial found non-elastic zinc bandages superior to alginate dressings or zinc-containing elastic stockinettes. Two controlled trials of zinc-containing tape for foot ulcers due to leprosy concluded that zinc tape was similarly effective, but more convenient than conventional dressings.
1 Star Comfrey Topical Refer to label instructions Comfrey has a long history of use as a topical agent for treating wounds, skin ulcers, thrombophlebitis, bruises, and sprains and strains. Comfrey has a long history of use as a topical agent for treating wounds, skin ulcers, thrombophlebitis, bruises, and sprains and strains.
1 Star Vitamin E Topical Refer to label instructions Antioxidants such as vitamin E, are depleted in healing skin tissue. One study found that topically applied vitamin E shortened the healing time of skin ulcers. Antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and glutathione are depleted in healing skin tissue. One animal study found that vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) applied to the skin shortened the healing time of skin ulcers. Another animal study reported that administration of oral vitamin E before skin lesions were introduced into the skin prevented some of the tissue damage associated with the development of pressure ulcers. A controlled human trial found that 400 IU of vitamin E daily improved the results of skin graft surgery for chronic venous ulcers. No further research has investigated the potential benefit of vitamin E for skin ulcers.

Does honey heal leg ulcers?

Abstract – The management of chronic wounds such as venous ulcers is a common and long-term issue with the aging population. Non-standard treatment that is both medically and financially effective needs to be identified. Honey has been used for its healing properties for centuries and has been used to successfully heal wounds including pressure-ulcers in our care facility.

However, there is not much evidence for its use in treating venous ulcers. To this end, I trialed the use of a honey-impregnated alginate dressing on a man who had a long-standing history of venous ulcers on his leg with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of honey as an alternative treatment to the current wound management therapies.

The honey seemed to act as an effective antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and deodorizing dressing, with total healing of the ulcer achieved. This result, together with past successes with the use of honey alginate on ulcerated wounds, has led to this product becoming mainstream in the treatment of chronic wounds within our care facility.