How To Treat Menopause Back Pain

0 Comments

How To Treat Menopause Back Pain
Lower Back Pain During Menopause – Woman go through hormonal lower back pain during her time of menopause. Many studies have proven and shown that the woman who go through immense and higher pain are more likely to face chronic lower back pain during her menopause.

Practice as many relaxation exercises as you can. The more relaxed and exercised your mind and body is, the less pain you will feel. Try to not stress out too much as it will only add more to your pain. Move around and do things that keep you active. Being lazy and laid back will decrease your body movements and exercise. Get plenty of rest and sleep.

Is it normal to have back pain during menopause?

Journal List J Midlife Health v.10(4); Oct-Dec 2019 PMC6947725

As a library, NLM provides access to scientific literature. Inclusion in an NLM database does not imply endorsement of, or agreement with, the contents by NLM or the National Institutes of Health. Learn more about our disclaimer. J Midlife Health.2019 Oct-Dec; 10(4): 163–164.

Women spend nearly one-third of their life in menopause. In this period, besides other comorbid conditions, women suffer from the onslaught of various musculoskeletal disorders also. One such problem is chronic low back pain (LBP) which is more prevalent in women than in men, and it also increases with age.

According to Dedicação et al,, about 70% of perimenopausal women have symptoms related to estrogen deficiency, such as vasomotor instability, sleep disorders, decreased bone mineral density, genitourinary atrophy, lipoprotein changes, and musculoskeletal pain, the latter being reported by more than half of the perimenopausal women.

Most studies show that women with a higher menopause symptom burden may be the most vulnerable for chronic back pain. Despite this, little attention has been paid to pain in the spine/low back ache and various problems of peripheral joints which are equally prevalent in this period of life. A biopsychosocial model of chronic pain attributes sex differences in pain to interactions between biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors such as social class, low levels of education, and low income.

The heightened pain sensitivity among women can also partially explain greater reports of pain by women compared to men. Population-based studies have shown that the prevalence of widespread pain increases with age, peaking in the seventh and eighth decades.

  • Recently, it has been shown that genetics also plays a role in the development of LBP.
  • Estrogen participates in a variety of biological processes through different molecular mechanisms.
  • Collagen wasting is commonly observed in bone and skin in the postmenopausal period due to decreased estrogen levels.

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been shown to be protective against menopause-associated osteoarthritis. However, in one study, Musgrave et al, reported that women taking HRT suffered more back pain and back pain-related disability than did those not taking HRT.

An in-depth understanding of the role of the gonadal hormones in LBP modulation remains unclear; whether HRT is useful for patients with severe LBP warrants further studies. At some point in life, 36.4% to 58% of people in European countries and in the United States experience LBP. This poses a great medical and socioeconomic challenge to such extent that some researchers call it a lifestyle disease.

It is the main cause of absence in the workplace and the second cause of visiting primary health-care professionals. Spine pain has negative psychological consequences as it impairs daily functioning of the affected person. It also poses a serious socioeconomic problem – it is costly due to disability-related absence in the workplace.

  • Various modalities of management of LBA proposed include physiotherapeutic procedures, exercises, manual therapy, massage, and physical measures.
  • Pharmacology is also used, for example, analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and muscle relaxants.
  • The American Pain Society and American College of Physicians stated that there is good evidence that specific physical exercises recommended by a physiotherapist have a moderate positive effect in LBP.

These organizations also pointed out that there is no good evidence for physical therapies (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and ultrasound) for LBP and so they do not recommend their use. Exercises in safe positions (with a minimal risk of worsening the pain), i.e.

supine position, and exercises strengthening the floor of the pelvis, the transversus abdominis, and the multifidus muscles are the most important stabilizers of the lower parts of the spine. It is thus concluded that perimenopausal stage of life is associated with an increased incidence of LBP. Increased body mass index (≥30) is one of the factors increasing the prevalence of pain.

Suggested forms of treatment include physiotherapeutic procedures such as physical exercises, massage, manual therapy, and proper physical postures along with drug therapy in selective patients. Further studies are necessary in the area of treatment of pain and association with LBP.

What causes back pain in females over 50?

Adults aged 50 years and older are especially vulnerable to lower back pain caused by age-related wear and tear of the spinal discs, joints, and other spinal structures, in addition to nonspecific causes of pain, such as muscle strain,

Is back pain a symptom of low estrogen?

The Most Common Causes of Back Pain in Females –

  1. Piriformis Syndrome – Many women will experience pain produced by spasms in the piriformis muscle, which is the large muscle deep in the buttock region. Due to pelvic changes brought on by hormones and pregnancy, women are more susceptible to this pain. It can cause irritation or compression of the sciatic nerve — causing radiating pain in the back of the leg. This is often mistaken for back pain associated with spinal problems. Women will experience pain in the buttock and hip area, especially when moving the hips. There may be pain getting out of bed and when sitting for long periods of time. You can get relief from the pain by lying on your back.
  2. Sacroiliac (SI) Joint Dysfunction – The sacroiliac joint connects the bottom of the spine to your pelvis. SI joint problems are among the more common causes of lower back pain. Women typically have a smaller SI joint surface area compared to men, which can cause stresses across the joint. This anatomical difference can lead to a higher risk of SI joint misalignment, especially in younger women. Pain is focused in the lower back and will usually be dull or achy but may flare up, causing sharp pain down the thigh. This is often mistaken for sciatica. The pain can increase when sitting or climbing stairs.
  3. Spinal Osteoarthritis – This is a common arthritis for women, typically discovered in the facet joints (vertebrae connectors). The risk increases with age and/or weight. This occurs when there is a breakdown of the fibrous cartilage in the facet joints. Without that “shock absorber,” bones may hit and rub together, producing pain in the upper or lower back, groin, buttocks, and thighs. You may notice pain and stiffness in the morning with flare-ups on the side of your back when bending.
  4. Degenerative Spondylolisthesis – This is a condition that occurs when a vertebra slips over the one below it due to degeneration. The condition is more common in post-menopausal women due to low estrogen levels. Low estrogen levels degrade the spinal discs and loosen the ligaments that hold vertebrae together, which causes spinal instability. Often, this condition causes lower back pain radiating into the legs and pain when walking due to spinal cord compression. You can get some relief when taking pressure off the spine by bending forward.
  5. – Otherwise known as pain in the tailbone, this pain is typically the result of injury or chronic irritation. It is more common in women due to the differences in the shape and angle of the pelvis or from injury during childbirth. The coccyx is responsible for weight-bearing support in a sitting position. Often, pain is felt while sitting, or standing from a seated position. The pain can be relieved when standing.
  6. Endometriosis – Exclusive to women — this is a gynecological issue. The describes it as a painful disorder in which tissue similar to the tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus — the endometrium — grows outside your uterus. Symptoms include a painful menstrual cycle with severe abdominal pain and, often, chronic lower back pain, especially during menstruation.
  7. PMS- Premenstrual syndrome – Another hormonal condition that may cause back pain for women is PMS, a condition many women get before their periods. The pain usually subsides when menstruation begins and can be treated with home remedies like heat and over-the-counter pain medications.
You might be interested:  To Flinch In Pain

Contact National Spine & Pain Centers to with an affiliated pain specialist today.

Does menopause pain go away?

Does menopause joint pain go away? – Most women do find that symptoms such as joint pain begin to ease off through the menopause as hormone levels even out and stabilise. However, this can also depend on your general health, stress levels, diet, exercise etc. So looking after yourself well at this time is very important.

Why does menopause cause lower back pain?

How Does Estrogen Affect Bone and Spine Health? – Estrogen plays a role in both male and female bone health. It promotes the activity of osteoblasts, which are the cells in the body that produce bone. Estrogen helps slow the breakdown of bones and encourages bone growth.

  • Because of this, drops in estrogen levels over time compromise the health of bones.
  • People with chronic hormone imbalances and postmenopausal women are both frequently affected by bone disease such as osteoporosis and osteopenia (a precursor to osteoporosis).
  • Studies show that the risk of developing osteoporosis is higher in postmenopausal women.

Lower estrogen levels lead to the loss of bone density over time. Estrogen also helps to maintain tissues that contain collagen, which can be found in intervertebral discs, Research has associated the lower estrogen levels that follow menopause to more severe lumbar disc degeneration and increased lower back pain in women when compared to men of a similar age.

Can hormones make my back hurt?

Hormonal changes – It can be your hormones. We know that oestrogen is needed to keep your discs, and your ligaments, and your tendons nice and flexible. And as your oestrogen decreases, this can cause a shrinking of the spine, just ever so slightly. And that can then impact on both movement and flexibility of your spine as well. That in itself can cause a lot of discomfort and back pain.

What causes lower back pain in females?

What Causes Upper Back Pain in Females? – The upper back or thoracic spine is the area that starts at the base of the neck and extends to the bottom of the ribcage. Upper back pain in women is usually due to:

Poor, like slouching or pushing the head forward while sitting or standing, causing misalignment of the spineMuscle overuse or strain, usually due to repetitive motions or lifting items or children incorrectlyInjury to discs, muscles and/or ligaments

Many instances of back pain are not serious. Minor strains and sprains will usually heal on their own. In a number of cases, correcting posture or getting more exercise to strengthen back tissues can prevent further instances of back pain.

Is magnesium good for menopause?

Supplements – Magnesium supplements are available over the counter or online. There are many forms of magnesium, such as magnesium aspartate, carbonate, citrate, glycinate, lactate, malate, and orotate. It’s also common to see magnesium paired with calcium, another important mineral for bone health ( 34 ).

You might be interested:  Finger Cramps Cure

Magnesium aspartate, citrate, chloride, and malate are known for being the most bioavailable — or best absorbed — in the body to replenish magnesium levels. Still, your healthcare provider may suggest other types depending on your specific needs ( 35 ). Moreover, most multivitamins, which are generally recommended for women over the age of 50 years, contain magnesium to help you meet your daily magnesium needs.

Though generally safe, if you’re unsure whether a magnesium supplement is right for you, talk to your healthcare provider. Summary Magnesium is found in many foods, such as dark chocolate, leafy greens, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. It’s also available as an individual supplement, paired with calcium, or in a multivitamin.

Magnesium plays a vital role in health throughout all life stages. During menopause, it’s important for keeping bones strong and preventing osteoporosis, or weakening of bones. Magnesium may also reduce unwanted side effects of menopause, such as difficulty sleeping and depression while supporting heart health.

Most menopausal women have inadequate magnesium levels, putting them at greater risk of poor health. However, magnesium can be consumed through many foods, such as dark chocolate, beans, lentils, nuts, seeds, leafy greens, and whole grains. You can also easily find magnesium supplements over the counter or online.

What vitamins are good for menopause joint pain?

2. Wild Nutrition Menopause Support Trio: Best multi-treatment menopause supplements – Price: £94 | Buy now from Wild Nutrition If you want a complete package that helps to support not only your bones and joints but deals with all aspects of the menopause, Wild Nutrition’s Menopause Support Trio is an excellent choice. Vitamin D, calcium and magnesium help to keep joints supple, while vitamin B6 is balanced with Dong Quai (a centuries-old botanical) to help regulate hormone activity – preventing hormones from falling off a cliff and exacerbating joint issues (among other things).

  1. The Bone Complex supplement in this trio is available to take on its own separately, although we think you’ll get more benefit from taking all three of the supplements together.
  2. We love the fact that all the products are produced organically and aim to support women in all aspects of their physical and mental health.

Wild Nutrition also does a support trio for the perimenopause, which is great since not many companies focus on the lead up to menopause. Key details – Type: Tablet; Dosage: 2 x Botanical Menopause Complex, 2 x 45+ Multi Nutrient, 3 x Food-Grown Bone Complex once a day; Dietary: Free of gluten, wheat, dairy and preservatives; Size: 30-day supply Buy now from Wild Nutrition

What age is back pain a red flag?

Age. Back pain in patients younger than 18 years or older than 50 years constitutes a red flag. In both groups, back pain is more likely to have a serious cause such as tumor or infection.

What are the red flags for back pain?

Other constitutional symptoms – Perform a complete review of systems on all patients presenting with low back pain, giving special attention to those with unexplained weight loss, night pain, or pain at rest. In general, unintentional weight loss requires a workup for malignancy; however, when it is accompanied by back pain it is particularly worrisome for metastatic disease.

How do I know if my back pain is serious?

When to see a doctor – Most back pain gradually improves with home treatment and self-care, usually within a few weeks. Contact your health care provider for back pain that:

  • Lasts longer than a few weeks.
  • Is severe and doesn’t improve with rest.
  • Spreads down one or both legs, especially if the pain goes below the knee.
  • Causes weakness, numbness, or tingling in one or both legs.
  • Is paired with unexplained weight loss.

In rare cases, back pain can signal a serious medical problem. Seek immediate care for back pain that:

  • Causes new bowel or bladder problems.
  • Is accompanied by a fever.
  • Follows a fall, blow to the back or other injury.

What does menopausal arthritis feel like?

Types of arthritis that might affect you in menopause This is joint pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of mobility caused by loss of cartilage that protects the spine, hips and knees, for example.

Does turmeric help menopause?

Warm up with turmeric By Vera Martins PhD Since we are covering detox with a warm twist, there is no herb that fits the bill better than the golden Indian spice turmeric (or Curcuma longa ) with its both warming and liver supporting properties. This wonderful herb, known in traditional Eastern medicine as a warming herb or spice, is an endless source of goodness, known as a potent anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and immune modulator.

Due to its therapeutic properties, turmeric not only supports detoxification steps in the liver but also help with several health conditions including gastrointestinal disorders (such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease – IBD, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome – IBS), osteoarthritis, diabetes and even cancer. The main active constituent of turmeric and the one responsible for its vibrant yellow colour is called curcumin, and has endless clinical trial data showing its therapeutic applications.

Covering the health benefits of turmeric could be a topic for infinite pages, but I would like to focus on how turmeric can better support your digestion and liver, giving your body a better chance for detoxing. If you would also like to know more about how looking after your liver and digestive system can help you detox, please read my article “”.

Detox and balance your hormones with turmeric Turmeric’s antioxidant properties give an extra protective boost to your liver. Turmeric can protect the liver from oxidative stress by acting as a free radical scavenger. Free radical molecules – created by poor diet, pollution and tobacco smoke amongst others – cause oxidation and DNA damage that all affect the liver and the body.

Turmeric also helps your body to detoxify by helping your liver to modify, inactivate and eliminate toxins and excess substances produced by the body (including hormones). For example, excess estrogen can lead to hormone imbalance and symptoms like PMS, heavy and painful periods and weight gain.

You might be interested:  Tailbone Pain Exercise

Since the liver has an important role in metabolising estrogen for elimination, turmeric can have an impact on hormone regulation via this mechanism. In addition, turmeric helps women managing some symptoms of menopause such as hot flushes and joint pain given its anti-inflammatory properties. Boost your “digestive fire” with turmeric Turmeric is known as a “warming” spice, promoting blood flow and stimulating digestion and therefore better nutrient absorption.

Studies have shown that turmeric reduced symptoms of bloating and gas in people suffering from indigestion. Research also shows that turmeric increases bile flow. Bile is a fluid that is naturally produced by the liver and stored in the gallbladder. Below are the reasons why bile production is so important:

Helps you absorb good fats: Appropriate bile production is the best way to assure you are absorbing good fats which are crucial for absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, K and E.

Key for hormone production: Absorption of good fats is also key for hormone production and for key organs such as the liver, brain, heart and skin.

Regulates bowel movements: Bile also emulsifies fat-soluble toxins helping the body to get rid of them and, particularly when combined with a fibre-rich diet, regulates bowel movements.

How can I take turmeric? Turmeric is a rhizome and can be simply taken as food incorporated into several dishes (curries, stews, home-made falafels and roasted vegetables) and drinks (lattes – read on for turmeric latte recipe, smoothies, juices and teas).

  • You can opt to grate or chop the fresh rhizome (available in several supermarkets and health shops) or buy the powdered dry root.
  • You can also take turmeric extract as a supplement, which is recommended in order to achieve therapeutic dosages and optimal absorption.
  • Supplements come in the form of capsules or herbal tinctures.

How much should I take? The University of Maryland Medical Center states that any dose between 1.5 and 3 grams is appropriate for an average-sized adult. Keep in mind that curcumin has a low bioavailability, which means that it is poorly absorbed by the body.

In order to boost absorption, mix turmeric with black pepper in a ratio of 10:1. Piperine, a constituent of black pepper, has been shown to increase curcumin absorption by 20 times. (Tip: add 1 teaspoon of black pepper to every 10 teaspoons of turmeric, mix well and store in an airtight jar away from light so it is ready to use).

Recipe: Spicy warming latte Ingredients:

Half a teaspoon of turmeric powder (mixed 10:1 with black pepper) Half a teaspoon of grounded cinnamon A couple of cardamom pods for extra flavour (optional) 1 cup of warm unsweetened almond milk

Mix together and enjoy!

Why do I ache so much during menopause?

Answer: – Many women experience joint and muscle pain and stiffness around the time of menopause – that they hadn’t experienced before. Because there are estrogen receptors all over the body, including the joints, declining hormone levels can add to pain caused by inflammation, general wear and tear, and just plain aging.

There are many causes of joint pain and hormones are only one aspect, so it is impossible to pinpoint hormones as the sole cause. The best way to keep joints healthy and flexible is to use them. As we get older, our activity levels decline, our weight goes up and joint stiffness begins. It is never too late to reverse this cycle.

Yoga or formal stretching time is a great way to improve flexibility and pump the synovial fluid around the joint. When a women is active and flexible, and the pain persists, her doctor can decide if hormone replacement has a role in improving the symptoms.

Where do you feel menopause pain?

What Does Joint Pain Feel Like? – Menopausal joint pain usually hits the worst in the morning and eases as the joints loosen up with the day’s activities. Most women complain of back pain, neck pain, as well as pain in the jaw, shoulders, and elbows. Wrists and fingers can also be affected.

What body pain is associated with menopause?

Answer: – Many women experience joint and muscle pain and stiffness around the time of menopause – that they hadn’t experienced before. Because there are estrogen receptors all over the body, including the joints, declining hormone levels can add to pain caused by inflammation, general wear and tear, and just plain aging.

  • There are many causes of joint pain and hormones are only one aspect, so it is impossible to pinpoint hormones as the sole cause.
  • The best way to keep joints healthy and flexible is to use them.
  • As we get older, our activity levels decline, our weight goes up and joint stiffness begins.
  • It is never too late to reverse this cycle.

Yoga or formal stretching time is a great way to improve flexibility and pump the synovial fluid around the joint. When a women is active and flexible, and the pain persists, her doctor can decide if hormone replacement has a role in improving the symptoms.

Can hormone issues cause back pain?

Hormonal changes – It can be your hormones. We know that oestrogen is needed to keep your discs, and your ligaments, and your tendons nice and flexible. And as your oestrogen decreases, this can cause a shrinking of the spine, just ever so slightly. And that can then impact on both movement and flexibility of your spine as well. That in itself can cause a lot of discomfort and back pain.

What is menopause pain like?

Joint pain – Menopause may cause joint pain that can affect the knees, shoulders, neck, elbows, or hands. Old joint injuries may begin to ache. As time goes on, you may start to notice that you feel more aches and pains in those areas than you used to.