How To Treat Pcos Fatigue

0 Comments

How To Treat Pcos Fatigue
How to fight PCOS fatigue in your day-to-day life

  1. Try to balance your diet.
  2. Stay hydrated.
  3. Take more exercise.
  4. Improve your sleep.
  5. Cut down on caffeine.
  6. Take supplements.

Can PCOS cause extreme tiredness?

Conclusion – Fatigue, or excessive tiredness, affects many women with PCOS. It currently is not clear what exactly causes it, and research about the connection between fatigue and PCOS is still going on. If you are affected by fatigue, make sure to mention it to your doctor or PCOS care team, as they can help you best. Sources:

NHS Choices. Sleep and Tiredness. NHS. Published 2019. https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/sleep-and-tiredness/10-medical-reasons-for-feeling-tired/Jackson A. Understanding Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Allen & Unwin; 2000.CDC. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Published 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/me-cfs/index.htmlNIDDK. Hashimoto’s Disease | NIDDK. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Published September 2017. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/endocrine-diseases/hashimotos-disease.NIH. Office of Dietary Supplements – Vitamin B12. Nih.gov. Published 2017. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamin%20B12-HealthProfessional/Nowak A, Boesch L, Andres E, et al. Effect of vitamin D3 on self-perceived fatigue. Medicine.2016;95(52):e5353. doi:10.1097/md.0000000000005353WHO. Burn-out an “occupational phenomenon”: International Classification of Diseases. www.who.int. Published May 2019. https://www.who.int/news/item/28-05-2019-burn-out-an-occupational-phenomenon-international-classification-of-diseasesHarvey SB, Wadsworth M, Wessely S, Hotopf M. The relationship between prior psychiatric disorder and chronic fatigue: evidence from a national birth cohort study. Psychological Medicine.2007;38(07). doi:10.1017/s0033291707001900Fava M. Symptoms of fatigue and cognitive/executive dysfunction in major depressive disorder before and after antidepressant treatment. J Clin Psychiatry.2003;64(suppl 14):30–34. Fernandez RC, Moore VM, Van Ryswyk EM, et al. Sleep disturbances in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: prevalence, pathophysiology, impact and management strategies. Nat Sci Sleep.2018;10:45-64. Published 2018 Feb 1. doi:10.2147/NSS.S127475Marshall JC, Dunaif A. Should all women with PCOS be treated for insulin resistance?. Fertil Steril.2012;97(1):18-22. doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.11.036Månsson M, Holte J, Landin-Wilhelmsen K, Dahlgren E, Johansson A, Landén M. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome are often depressed or anxious—A case-control study. Psychoneuroendocrinology.2008;33(8):1132-1138. doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2008.06.003Aroda VR, Edelstein SL, Goldberg RB, et al. Long-term Metformin Use and Vitamin B12 Deficiency in the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab.2016;101(4):1754-1761. doi:10.1210/jc.2015-3754

‌ : PCOS and Fatigue – Why Are You Feeling So Tired?

What medication is used for PCOS fatigue?

Treatment – Chronic PCOS fatigue has no direct cure. The treatment focuses on managing the symptoms, and the most troublesome symptoms are addressed first. In some cases, prescription and over-the-counter medications are used to treat PCOS fatigue and its symptoms.

What vitamin helps with PCOS energy?

Co Enzyme Q10 – Coenzyme Q10 or CoQ10, plays a role in energy production in muscle cells. Emerging research is showing that CoQ10, may offer numerous benefits to people with PCOS. Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to be involved in improving fertility and pregnancy in women with PCOS by improving egg quality,

How do you calm a PCOS flare up?

Adrenal PCOS – This type of PCOS is due to an abnormal stress response and affects around 10% of those diagnosed. Typically DHEA-S (another type of androgen from the adrenal glands) will be elevated alone, and high levels of testosterone and androstenedione are not seen.

  • Manage stress. Reducing stress levels through activities like yoga, meditation, mindfulness and journalling will help to support your nervous system and your hormones.
  • Get enough sleep each night. Make sure you’re getting at least 8 hours of sleep each night to support your stress levels and recovery.
  • Avoid high intensity exercise. Limit excessive and high intensity training as this can further put a stress on your adrenals.
  • Avoid caffeine from coffee, tea and fizzy drinks.
  • Speak to a practitioner about herbs and supplements. Specific herbs like withania, rhodiola and liquorice can help the body adapt and recover from stress. Nutrients like magnesium, vitamin B5 and vitamin C are also important to support the adrenal glands and nervous system. You’ll need to speak to a professional about correct dosages and which supplements to take, especially when it comes to herbs as they may not be right for you.
  • Do people with PCOS need more sleep?

    Management of sleep disturbances in PCOS – Referral to a sleep specialist allows diagnosis of clinical conditions such as OSA and insomnia, and subsequent treatment. OSA is generally diagnosed using overnight polysomnography to generate AHI.40 Insomnia diagnosis ideally requires assessment by a clinical psychologist.173 However, many sleep medicine clinics do not currently have the resources necessary for adequate diagnosis, such as the ISI questionnaire, sleep diaries and measures of daytime fatigue without sleepiness.

    • It important to recognize that OSA and insomnia are frequently comorbid, 173 and also that women with PCOS may have other forms of sleep disturbance.
    • Weight loss is generally recommended for overweight and obese people with OSA, 40 although recent research has indicated that weight loss may only decrease the severity of OSA in a minority of patients.174 As described above, weight loss may be particularly difficult to achieve in many women with PCOS due to hormonal abnormalities and other factors.

    Weight loss in women with PCOS would improve insulin sensitivity and symptom profiles, including fertility, so research is needed to understand the type and intensity of support required to achieve this. Avoidance of alcohol and sedative medications, which may predispose the upper airway to collapse, is also frequently recommended for OSA.40 Again, this poses a particular difficulty for women with PCOS in view of their anxiety and use of alcohol, possibly as a coping mechanism.175 In cases of mild OSA, oral appliances, commonly known as mandibular advancement splints, which are custom-made to increase upper airway size and reduce the likelihood of airway collapse during sleep, may be recommended.40 However, efficacy and acceptability of oral appliances in women with PCOS is yet to be explored.

    A small amount of research has been conducted in women with PCOS about the benefits of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, involving wearing a mask over the nose during sleep to maintain airway patency. CPAP has been shown to be a promising treatment for OSA in young obese women with PCOS, with improvements in insulin sensitivity, daytime diastolic blood pressure, and cardiac sympathovagal balance after eight weeks of treatment.176 These results indicate the need for a larger, well-designed randomized controlled trial to assess the clinically relevant effects of CPAP treatment on markers of future cardiovascular risk in women with PCOS.177 For the general OSA subpopulation (mostly men), there is now evidence from systematic reviews with meta-analysis that CPAP reduces blood pressure 178 and endothelial dysfunction, which promote the development of atherosclerosis.179, 180 Thus, CPAP could have a role in primary prevention of vascular disease, despite recent findings that CPAP is not effective in reducing coronary events in those with preexisting vascular disease.181 Systematic reviews with meta-analysis have also indicated that insulin resistance can be improved with CPAP use, thereby possibly reducing the risk of development of type 2 diabetes in nondiabetic and prediabetic individuals.18 Importantly for women with PCOS, a systematic review with meta-analysis has provided evidence that CPAP treatment reduces depressive symptoms.182 A subsequent large, randomized controlled trial of over 2000 individuals with moderate-to-severe OSA and coronary or cerebrovascular disease demonstrated that CPAP was effective in increasing QoL as well as decreasing symptoms of depression and anxiety.183 The American College of Physicians now recommends cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) as the most appropriate treatment for all adults with insomnia.184 This treatment is also recommended as a first-line treatment for insomnia by the British Association for Psychopharmacology.185 The efficacy of CBT in treating insomnia symptoms has been demonstrated in multiple systematic reviews with meta-analyses, 186 – 189 but most sleep clinics do not have clinical psychologists available to provide this treatment.

    In view of the widespread mental health and other problems reported among women with PCOS, there is a good case for referral to a clinical psychologist who can assess and address problems holistically. In recent years, trials have been undertaken to assess the efficacy of online delivery of CBT for insomnia, using highly structured internet programs as a means of overcoming the barriers to face-to-face delivery of treatment.190 A recent systematic review with meta-analysis of 15 randomized controlled trials of internet CBT for insomnia found evidence of clinically significant improvements in symptoms, of the order achieved in face-to-face CBT.190 Importantly, the ISI score of patients was found to be reduced overall by 21%, 190 and by 15% in a similar systematic review with meta-analysis.191 This option may appeal to women with PCOS as cost-effective, but they should still be encouraged to consult a clinical psychologist or other professional support services for wider problems.

    1. There are well-recognized hazards in using pharmacotherapy for the primary treatment of insomnia.
    2. Depending on the type of drug used, negative effects include carry-over daytime sedation, slowed reactions and memory impairment, as well as the potential for intensification of symptoms upon cessation of treatment.173 Pharmacotherapy is only recommended short term.192 This is particularly pertinent for women with PCOS whose insomnia and other sleep disturbances are unlikely to be short term and are related to underlying factors that need to be addressed directly.

    Women who experience sleep disturbances, but do not meet the criteria for clinical diagnosis of a sleep disorder, may benefit from sleep hygiene approaches. This includes behavioral and environmental recommendations for promoting sleep.193 Avoidance of smoking and alcohol and regular physical activity are aspects of sleep hygiene that have already been described.

    • Other recommendations include avoidance of caffeine, adhering to regular sleep and wake times and stress management.193 Stress management techniques, such as mindfulness, have been shown to reduce presleep arousal and worry, 194 which may be beneficial for women with PCOS.
    • Clinical anxiety requires psychological expertise, however.

    As has been highlighted throughout this review, it is common for women with PCOS to experience symptoms that span multiple medical specialties. The management of sleep disturbances among women with PCOS should form part of an interdisciplinary model of care (summarized in Figure 5 ) with effective communication between care providers.195 It is important that interdisciplinary care is patient-centered 195 and emphasizes a holistic approach to health and well-being. Model of interdisciplinary care recommended for management of sleep disturbances and disorders in women with PCOS. Note: Teede HJ, Misso ML, Deeks AA, et al. Assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome: summary of an evidence-based guideline.

    Does inositol help with PCOS fatigue?

    Treating PCOS and Fatigue – Scientists and physicians have been working on how to treat PCOS fatigue for years. Lucky for those fighting this, fatigue treatments are available and are effective. Women now can benefit from treatments for fatigue that also fight other PCOS symptoms.

    If you are taking a scientifically-backed PCOS treatment, you should be getting relief from extreme fatigue. Exhaustion by PCOS is caused by adrenal fatigue, insulin resistance, sleep apnea and thyroid issues to name a few. One PCOS supplement to take daily that helps with fatigue is Inositol. This drug is scientifically proven to help alleviate PCOS sysmptoms in women.

    Benefits of taking Inositol also include:

    • Reduced levels of testosterone
    • Improved frequency of ovulation
    • Decreased anxiety
    • Reduced insulin resistance
    • Decreased risk of cardiovascular disease
    • Increase embryo and egg quality
    • Regularized menstrual cycles
    • Reduced body fat
    • Reduced blood sugar
    • Reduced blood pressure
    • Reduced HbA1c

    One of the bess all-natural supplements for PCOS fatigue is Elan Healthcares Inofolic, It is known for its ability to tackle PCOS’ worst symptoms to provide great improvement to women so they can start living their best lives. You will find this treatment option available in 2-gram sachets as well as in bulk form.

    • It is important to note that not all inositol supplements can offer the same benefits.
    • Our recommendations are supplements that follow a 40:1 ratio of Myo-inositol and D’Chiro inositol.
    • Thereinositol There are a numbernumer of studies to prove that this ratio is one of the most effective to beat the fatigue brought on by PCOS as well as to combat other PCOS symptoms.

    Women looking to get pregnant with PCOS will find the most useful supplement with a 40:1 ratio. This ratio has been found by a recent study to be very vital for conception,

    Does PCOS cause brain fog?

    What Is Brain Fog and What To Do About It Brain fog is a tricky term. Some call it scatterbrain, fuzzy-thinking, or being distracted and unfocused. Some people simply say their brains are not working properly. Mental health practitioners may refer to this as “mild cognitive impairment,” which doesn’t really give a clearer view of what brain fog is.

    • Slow thinking
    • Difficulty focusing
    • Forgetfulness
    • Confusion
    • Lack of concentration
    • Haziness in the thought process

    We all have had our fair share of foggy brain days: taking forever to remember someone’s name, unable to concentrate on work tasks for long enough, or getting bogged down with too much information. Having some sort of mental fatigue once in a while is normal.

    1. Constant brain fog, however, can be a sign of an underlying condition.
    2. For instance, brain fog is common among PCOS patients because of a number of conditions associated with the syndrome.
    3. These may include sleep apnea, mood disorders, abnormal hormone levels, and blood sugar spikes and dips due to insulin resistance.

    If you have PCOS and lack focus or unable to think clearly, discuss your symptoms with your primary care physician or your PCOS care team. You may need to incorporate changes in your daily routine or seek a referral for further evaluation.

    You might be interested:  How To Treat High Porosity Hair

    Why am I tired all of the time?

    Do you feel like you’re always tired ? Are you having trouble staying awake during prime-time sitcoms? Most of us know what it’s like to be tired, especially when we have a cold, the flu, or some other viral infection, But when you have a constant lack of energy and ongoing fatigue, it may be time to check with your doctor.

    1. Fatigue is a lingering tiredness that is constant and limiting.
    2. With fatigue, you have unexplained, persistent, and relapsing exhaustion.
    3. It’s similar to how you feel when you have the flu or have missed a lot of sleep,
    4. If you have chronic fatigue, or systemic exertion intolerance disease (SEID), you may wake in the morning feeling as though you’ve not slept.

    Or you may be unable to function at work or be productive at home. You may be too exhausted even to manage your daily affairs. In most cases, there’s a reason for the fatigue. It might be allergic rhinitis, anemia, depression, fibromyalgia, chronic kidney disease, liver disease, lung disease ( COPD ), a bacterial or viral infection, or some other health condition.

    • If that’s the case, then the long-term outlook is good.
    • Here are some common causes of fatigue and how they are resolved.
    • Symptoms: Fatigue, headache, itchiness, nasal congestion, and drainage Allergic rhinitis is a common cause of chronic fatigue.
    • But allergic rhinitis often can be easily treated and self-managed.

    To make a diagnosis, your doctor will assess your symptoms. The doctor will also find out, through a detailed history or testing, whether your allergies are triggered by pollens, insects (dust mites or cockroaches), animal dander, molds and mildew, weather changes, or something else.

    Nasal steroids Oral antihistamines Nasal antihistaminesLeukotriene modifiersMast cell stabilizers

    Allergy shots – immunotherapy – may help in severe cases. This treatment involves weekly shots of increasingly higher solutions of the offending allergens. Allergy shots take time to be effective and are usually administered over a period of 3 to 5 years.

    Symptoms: Fatigue, dizziness, feeling cold, crankiness Anemia is the most common blood condition in the U.S. It affects more than 5.6% of Americans. For women in their childbearing years, anemia is a common cause of fatigue. This is especially true for women who have heavy menstrual cycles, uterine fibroid tumors, or uterine polyps,

    Anemia is a condition in which you don’t have enough red blood cells. It can happen for many reasons. For instance, it may be the result of hemorrhoids or GI problems such as ulcers, or cancer, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs ) such as ibuprofen or aspirin can also lead to GI problems and bleeding.

    • Other causes of anemia include a lack of iron, folic acid, or vitamin B12,
    • Chronic diseases such as diabetes or kidney disease can also cause anemia,
    • To confirm a diagnosis of anemia, your doctor will give you a blood test.
    • If iron deficiency is the cause of your fatigue, treatment may include iron supplements,

    You can also add iron-rich foods such as spinach, broccoli, and red meat to your diet to help relieve symptoms. Vitamin C with meals or with iron supplements can help the iron to be better absorbed and improve your symptoms. Symptoms: Sadness; feeling hopeless, worthless, and helpless; fatigue Sometimes, depression or anxiety is at the root of chronic fatigue.

    • Depression affects twice as many women as men and often runs in families.
    • It commonly begins between the ages of 15 and 30.
    • Postpartum depression can happen after the birth of a baby.
    • Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter, with feelings of fatigue and sadness.
    • Major depression is also one part of bipolar disorder,

    With depression, you might be in a depressed mood most of the day. You may have little interest in normal activities. Along with feelings of fatigue, you may eat too much or too little, over- or under-sleep, feel hopeless and worthless, and have other serious symptoms.

    Agitation Trouble sleeping Worrying too muchFeeling “on alert” most of the timeFeeling of impending doomNervousness

    If you are depressed or have regular symptoms of anxiety, talk to your doctor and get a physical exam, If there is no physical cause for the depression or anxiety, your doctor may talk with you about treatment options, and may refer you to a psychiatrist or psychologist for a psychological evaluation.

    • Although the specific causes of depression and/or anxiety are unclear, these are highly treatable medical problems.
    • Medication, psychotherapy, or a combination of the two can help relieve symptoms.
    • Symptoms: Fatigue, fever, head or body aches.
    • Fatigue can be a symptom of infections ranging from the flu to HIV.

    If you have an infection, you’ll probably have other symptoms like fever, head or body aches, shortness of breath, or appetite loss. (They’ll vary depending on what infection you have.) Infections that may cause fatigue include:

    Flu Mononucleosis COVID-19Cytomegalovirus Hepatitis HIV Pneumonia

    Treating the infection often relieves your fatigue. But some infections, including mononucleosis and COVID-19, can lead to long-lasting tiredness. Symptoms: Chronic fatigue, deep muscle pain, painful tender points, sleep problems, anxiety, depression Fibromyalgia is one of the more common causes of chronic fatigue and musculoskeletal pain, especially in women.

    • Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome are considered separate but related disorders.
    • They share a common symptom: severe fatigue that greatly interferes with people’s lives.
    • With fibromyalgia, you may feel that no matter how long you sleep, it’s never restful.
    • And you may feel as if you are always fatigued during daytime hours.

    Your sleep may be interrupted by frequent waking. Yet, you may not remember any sleep disruptions the next day. Some people with fibromyalgia live in a constant “fibro fog” – a hazy feeling that makes it hard to concentrate. Constant daytime fatigue with fibromyalgia often results in people not getting enough exercise.

    • That causes a decline in physical fitness,
    • It can also lead to mood-related problems.
    • The best way to offset these effects is to try to exercise more.
    • Exercise has tremendous benefits for sleep, mood, and fatigue.
    • If you do try swimming (or any moderate exercise) to ease fatigue, start slowly.
    • As you become accustomed to the added physical activity, you can increase your time in the pool or gym.

    Set up a regular time for exercise. Avoid overdoing it, which could add to your fatigue. Symptoms: Fatigue, sleepiness, continued exhaustion Although food is supposed to give you energy, medical research suggests that hidden food intolerances – or allergies – can do the opposite.

    In fact, fatigue may be an early warning sign of food intolerance or food allergy, Celiac disease, which happens when you can’t digest gluten, may also cause fatigue. Ask your doctor about the elimination diet. This is a diet in which you cut out certain foods linked to a variety of symptoms, including sleepiness within 10 to 30 minutes of eating them, for a certain period of time to see if that makes a difference.

    You can also talk to your doctor about a food allergy test – or invest in a home test such as ALCAT – which may help you identify the offending foods. Symptoms: Fatigue from an activity that should be easy If you’re exhausted after an activity that used to be easy – for example, walking up the steps – it may be time to talk to your doctor about the possibility of heart disease,

    • Heart disease is the leading cause of death in women.
    • If your fatigue is related to your heart, medication or treatments can usually help correct the problem, cut the fatigue, and restore your energy.
    • Symptoms: Fatigue, morning stiffness, joint pain, inflamed joints Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a type of inflammatory arthritis, is another cause of excessive fatigue.

    Because joint damage can result in disability, early and aggressive treatment is the best approach for rheumatoid arthritis, Medications that may be used early in mild RA include:

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)

    Other drugs used in more serious forms of RA include the anti-cytokine therapies (anti- tumor necrosis factor alpha agents), as well as shots and other forms of treatment. Other autoimmune disorders, such as lupus and Sjogren’s disease, may also cause fatigue.

    1. Symptoms: Chronic fatigue, feeling exhausted upon awakening, snoring Sleep disorders are a group of conditions that disrupt or prevent restful, restorative sleep.
    2. That can take a toll on your health and quality of life, so it’s important to look out for signs and symptoms.
    3. Sleep apnea is one of the most common sleep disorders.

    If you or your partner notices loud snoring and you wake up tired and stay that way, you could have sleep apnea, More than one-third of adults in the U.S. snore at least a few nights a week. But if the snoring stops your breathing for seconds at a time, it could be sleep apnea,

    Learn more about the best sleep positions and see if sleeping on your stomach is bad or not. Obstructive sleep apnea causes low blood oxygen levels. That’s because blockages prevent air from getting to the lungs, The low oxygen levels also affect how well your heart and brain work. Sometimes, the only clue that you might have sleep apnea is chronic fatigue.

    Your doctor may prescribe a medical device called CPAP that helps keep your airways open while you sleep. In severe cases of sleep apnea, surgery may help. The surgeon will remove tissues that are blocking the airways. If left untreated, sleep apnea can increase your risk of a stroke or heart attack,

    Insomnia : You can’t get to sleep or stay asleep through the night. Narcolepsy : You feel extremely sleepy during the day and may fall asleep suddenly. Restless legs syndrome (RLS): Your legs feel uncomfortable and you have an urge to move them as you fall asleep. REM sleep behavior disorder: You act out dreams in your sleep with talking, walking, or swinging your arms.

    Talk with your doctor about a sleep study (polysomnogram) to find out if you have a sleep disorder. Lose weight if you are overweight, and if you smoke, stop. Both obesity and smoking are risk factors for sleep apnea, Sleeping on your side instead of your back may help stop mild sleep apnea.

    1. Symptoms: Extreme fatigue, increased thirst and hunger, more urination, unusual weight loss The incidence of type 2 diabetes is rising in children and adults in the U.S.
    2. If you have symptoms of type 2 diabetes, call your doctor and ask to be tested.
    3. While finding out you have diabetes may be frightening, type 2 diabetes can be self-managed with guidance from your doctor.

    Treatment for type 2 diabetes may include:

    Losing excess weight Increasing physical activity Maintaining strict blood glucose controlTaking diabetes medications ( insulin or other drugs)Eating a low glycemic index carbohydrate diet, or, though controversial, a low- carbohydrate diet

    Other lifestyle measures are important if you want to stay well with type 2 diabetes, They include quitting smoking, controlling your blood pressure, and reducing your cholesterol, Symptoms: Extreme fatigue, sluggishness, feeling run-down, depression, cold intolerance, weight gain The problem may be a slow or underactive thyroid,

    This is known as hypothyroidism, The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland that sits at the base of your neck. It helps set the rate of metabolism, which is the rate at which the body uses energy. According to the American Thyroid Foundation, about 17% of all women will have a thyroid disorder by age 60.

    And most won’t know it. The most common cause is an autoimmune disorder known as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Hashimoto’s stops the gland from making enough thyroid hormones for the body to work the way it should. The result is hypothyroidism, or a slow metabolism,

    Blood tests known as T3 and T4 will detect thyroid hormones. If these hormones are low, synthetic hormones (medication) can bring you up to speed, and you should begin to feel better fairly rapidly. If you have been diagnosed with cancer, fatigue is often part of the disease itself or a side effect of some treatments.

    Cancer-related fatigue is far more severe than feeling tired if you don’t have cancer. You might feel too tired to move around, and you may also feel weak. It can happen with the more common types of cancer (such as lung cancer, colon cancer, or breast cancer ); with the rarer types, such as cancers of the brain and spinal cord; and with blood cancers, which include leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma,

    If you haven’t been diagnosed with cancer, feeling very tired can be a symptom, but there are many other more likely causes. If you have other symptoms, or if your fatigue doesn’t ease after you get more rest and make other lifestyle changes, see your doctor and tell them how you are feeling. Many physical and mental illnesses, as well as lifestyle factors, can cause your fatigue, and that can make it hard to diagnose.

    In some cases, it might be something simple and easy to fix, like having caffeine at bedtime. But other causes, like heart disease or COPD, are serious, and you may need to start long-term treatment right away. Your doctor can help you sift through your health issues, as well as diet, exercise, and other lifestyle habits, in order to zero in on the cause and help you on the road to recovery.

    Is magnesium good for PCOS?

    Magnesium for PCOS: Key Takeaways – Magnesium has various benefits for individuals with PCOS like reducing insulin resistance and testosterone levels, lowering anxiety, improving sleep, and preventing migraines, However, individuals with PCOS are more likely to under consume magnesium-rich foods and may require magnesium supplementation.

    How much B12 should I take daily for PCOS?

    How Much Vitamin B12 Do I Need? – Adults need 2.4 mcg daily (2.6 mcg per day if pregnant and 2.8 mcg per day if breastfeeding). Those with PCOS need more if they are taking metformin.

    How much magnesium should I take daily for PCOS?

    Provides PMS Relief – Magnesium is a safe and effective treatment for relieving the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome ( PMS ). Magnesium supplementation of 250 mg daily has been shown to be helpful for lessening bloating, cravings, cramping and reducing anxiety and sleep disturbances associated with PMS.

    • Chocolate is one of the most common foods women crave right before they start their periods.
    • Chocolate is one of the highest food sources of magnesium.
    • Coincidence? Magnesium has also been shown to be effective for preventing or ameliorating headaches or migraines and preventing dysmenorrhea (heavy blood flow).
    You might be interested:  How To Relieve Severe Leg Pain At Night

    For other natural treatments to treat PMS, check out our article, Natural Treatments for PMS When you have PCOS.

    Why is PCOS so stressful?

    No matter who you are, you likely experience stress in your normal life. Whether it be a demanding job, difficult life circumstances, or managing a busy household, stress is everywhere. Because stress is so common and often even normalized in our modern society, stress gets overlooked when it comes to health concerns.

    1. Stress impacts all systems in the body, and there is an important connection between stress and PCOS.
    2. What exactly is stress? When you think of stress, you probably think of its symptoms, such as feeling uptight, racing heartbeat, irritability, or even headaches.
    3. All of these things can occur as a result of a stress response, which involves something called the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis or your body’s “stress response system”.

    This axis involves two different parts of your brain as well as your adrenal glands. It is the primary system that your body activates in times of stress. When your brain senses something stressful, it activates a physiological response in your body, also known as “fight or flight” mode.

    1. This stimulates the production of stress hormones like cortisol from your adrenal glands.
    2. During this response, both blood pressure and blood sugar increase as a protective mechanism to keep you alive and to keep up with the demands of the brain.
    3. Once that stressor is removed, there’s a negative feedback loop that will turn off the production of these stress hormones and signal to the brain that you’re safe.

    Keep in mind that stress comes in all shapes and sizes, and there are many different types of stressors. Most often we think about stress as being emotional, but stress can also be physical or even environmental. Here are some examples of each type of stressor : Physical stressors- Over-exercising or participating in high-intensity activities like HIIT workouts

    Going on and off diets or frequently gaining and losing weight (aka “yo-yo” dieting) Caloric restriction (undereating) Fasting Nutrient deficiencies Excessive alcohol intake Not getting enough sleep Gut infections and imbalances Illness or injury

    Environmental Stressors-

    Chemicals and other toxins

    Heavy metal exposure Pollutants like cigarette smoke

    Emotional Stressors-

    Parenting

    Financial burdens Long “to-do” lists and a feeling of a lack of time Sitting in traffic and/or being late Comparing yourself to others Emotional trauma of any kind, both past, and present Death of a loved one or pet Not dealing with your emotions Saying yes to everything, and having poor boundaries with both people and tasks Pressure to “do it all” Strained relationships Mental health issues, like anxiety and depression Loneliness Etc.

    *Note that even “healthy” behaviors like exercise or HIIT training are stressors. In the right context, these types of stressors can be health-promoting and adaptive. But in the wrong context (like over-exercising and undereating or HIIT training when the body is sleep-deprived) these things can put too much stress on the body.

    • What happens when the body is exposed to long-term (chronic) stress? Activation of the HPA axis is both necessary and helpful for your body during acute stress.
    • A healthy stress response is one that activates the HPA Axis when needed and turns it off when it doesn’t.
    • The way that our bodies have been hard-wired to deal with stress and respond to stress is very short-term.

    Unfortunately, stress is everywhere in our modern society. This makes it easy for short-term (acute) stress to turn into long-term (chronic) stress. This can lead to excess cortisol production and can create many stress-related problems, Basically, when your body is prioritizing survival via the “fight or flight” mode, it’s not focused on general maintenance and repair that it views as not essential.

    High cortisol levels suppress your immune and digestive systems. It also interferes with normal metabolism, thyroid function, reproductive functioning, and more. This can lead to things like weight gain, elevated blood sugar, mood, and gut disorders. The relationship between PCOS, androgens, and stress Elevated androgens are a common hormonal imbalance associated with PCOS that can drive many of the unpleasant symptoms women deal with.

    Oftentimes there is a huge emphasis on the ovarian production of androgens – which is mostly stimulated by excess insulin. But it’s also important to know that the adrenal glands produce a significant portion of androgen hormones! So when the adrenals are chronically being activated by different types of stressors, this can contribute to the overproduction of androgen hormones.

    • Both the ovaries and the adrenal glands can contribute to high androgen levels that drive PCOS symptoms.
    • Some women have adrenal-dominant PCOS while other women have ovary-dominant PCOS, and many women have a combination of both.
    • Women with PCOS have also been found to produce more cortisol at baseline than women without PCOS.

    This means that women with PCOS may have more sensitive stress response systems. In my experience working with hundreds of women with PCOS, this connection often gets overlooked. I see many women engaging in behaviors like over-exercising or being in a chronic caloric deficit that actually stresses their body out and makes PCOS symptoms significantly worse.

    How do you feel happy with PCOS?

    2. Practice positive affirmations – When you’re dealing with PCOS, being told to be positive might come across as a little annoying. However, there is an effective way to challenge and overcome pessimistic thought patterns. This is by practicing positive affirmations, which can reinforce feelings of self-love and belief. Here are some affirmations you could say to yourself on a daily basis:

    1. I believe in myself.
    2. I acknowledge the many brilliant qualities and talents I have.
    3. I surround myself with positive people who bring the best out in me.
    4. I let go of the negative feelings and opinions I have about myself.
    5. I love and cherish who I’ve become.

    What are the 4 stages of PCOS?

    THERE ARE 4 TYPES OF PCOS – In this section, we will cover different types of PCOS and what kind of PCOS do you have,There are four types of PCOS: Insulin-resistant PCOS, Inflammatory PCOS, Hidden-cause PCOS, and Pill-induced PCOS.

    Is oversleeping bad for PCOS?

    The Dangers Of Too Much Sleep – Women with PCOS are at higher risk of oversleeping (regularly needing more than nine hours in a night). This can also be a warning sign for other underlying health conditions, including sleep disorders such as sleep apnoea or mental health conditions such as depression, both of which people with PCOS are at greater risk of.

    Can you live a happy life with PCOS?

    Defining Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) – Polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, is a condition in which a woman’s body secretes extra male hormones, called androgens. This excess in androgens can cause her ovaries to produce too many immature egg follicles each month.

    These are the “polycystic ovaries” responsible for the name of the condition. Excess androgens are also responsible for many of the other symptoms of the condition. In a normal menstrual cycle, hormonal changes result in the maturation and release of an egg during each cycle. Due to the excess androgens, the follicles in a woman’s ovary don’t mature fully and aren’t released.

    This leads to the development of small ovarian cysts, which can be seen on ultrasound. Since ovulation often fails to occur, the shedding of the uterine lining (the menstrual period) often fails to occur as well. This leads to the common symptoms of irregular periods, and often, infertility.

    • Researchers aren’t certain exactly what causes the excess androgens responsible for the clinical symptoms of PCOS.
    • It appears there may be some genetic component, and it can run in families.
    • Theories include an excess of insulin (due to insulin resistance) leading to increased production of androgens, or low-grade inflammation in the ovaries also leading to increased production of androgens.

    At least 1 in 10 women have PCOS. While it can be scary to hear that your partner has a medical condition, please know that she can live a full, healthy life if her PCOS is well managed. It’s important as the partner of a woman with PCOS to realize that she did nothing wrong to cause her condition.

    When does PCOS become serious?

    What is PCOS? – PCOS is one of the most common causes of female infertility, affecting 6% to 12% (as many as 5 million) of US women of reproductive age. But it’s a lot more than that. This lifelong health condition continues far beyond the child-bearing years.

    Women with PCOS are often insulin resistant ; their bodies can make insulin but can’t use it effectively, increasing their risk for type 2 diabetes. They also have higher levels of androgens (male hormones that females also have), which can stop eggs from being released (ovulation) and cause irregular periods, acne, thinning scalp hair, and excess hair growth on the face and body.

    Women with PCOS can develop serious health problems, especially if they are overweight:

    • Diabetes —more than half of women with PCOS develop type 2 diabetes by age 40
    • Gestational diabetes (diabetes when pregnant)—which puts the pregnancy and baby at risk and can lead to type 2 diabetes later in life for both mother and child
    • Heart disease —women with PCOS are at higher risk, and risk increases with age
    • High blood pressure —which can damage the heart, brain, and kidneys
    • High LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and low HDL (“good”) cholesterol—increasing the risk for heart disease
    • Sleep apnea —a disorder that causes breathing to stop during sleep and raises the risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes
    • Stroke —plaque (cholesterol and white blood cells) clogging blood vessels can lead to blood clots that in turn can cause a stroke

    PCOS is also linked to depression and anxiety, though the connection is not fully understood.

    What does PCOS belly look like?

    As previously stated, the shape of a PCOS belly differs from other types of weight gain. It often appears large and bloated but can also be small and round, depending on genetics and other factors. The PCOS belly involves the accumulation of visceral fat in the lower abdomen and typically feels firm to the touch.

    What are the signs of adrenal fatigue in PCOS?

    Are there any differences in PCOS symptoms? – Your specific symptoms could be the key to figuring out which type of PCOS you’re dealing with. Here’s what to look out for:

    Insulin Resistant PCOS: The most likely symptom is weight gain. You may also have acne, hair growth/loss, irregular periods, and mood and sleep issues. Inflammatory PCOS: The most likely symptom is fatigue, but you may notice digestive issues and food sensitivity. You may also suffer from skin issues, headaches or joint pains. One study found those with PCOS had an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, so watch for symptoms of these conditions too. Adrenal PCOS: The most likely symptom is weight gain, but you may also experience acne, hair growth/loss, and irregular periods. If stress, mood swings, fatigue and sleep problems are recurring for you, this could be a sign of Adrenal PCOS. Post-Pill PCOS: The symptoms of this type are the same as in Insulin Resistant PCOS, but they will only come on after you stop taking birth control.

    Can ovary problems cause tiredness?

    Others symptoms of ovarian cancer can include: Fatigue (extreme tiredness) Upset stomach. Back pain.

    Why am I tired all of the time?

    Do you feel like you’re always tired ? Are you having trouble staying awake during prime-time sitcoms? Most of us know what it’s like to be tired, especially when we have a cold, the flu, or some other viral infection, But when you have a constant lack of energy and ongoing fatigue, it may be time to check with your doctor.

    • Fatigue is a lingering tiredness that is constant and limiting.
    • With fatigue, you have unexplained, persistent, and relapsing exhaustion.
    • It’s similar to how you feel when you have the flu or have missed a lot of sleep,
    • If you have chronic fatigue, or systemic exertion intolerance disease (SEID), you may wake in the morning feeling as though you’ve not slept.

    Or you may be unable to function at work or be productive at home. You may be too exhausted even to manage your daily affairs. In most cases, there’s a reason for the fatigue. It might be allergic rhinitis, anemia, depression, fibromyalgia, chronic kidney disease, liver disease, lung disease ( COPD ), a bacterial or viral infection, or some other health condition.

    If that’s the case, then the long-term outlook is good. Here are some common causes of fatigue and how they are resolved. Symptoms: Fatigue, headache, itchiness, nasal congestion, and drainage Allergic rhinitis is a common cause of chronic fatigue. But allergic rhinitis often can be easily treated and self-managed.

    To make a diagnosis, your doctor will assess your symptoms. The doctor will also find out, through a detailed history or testing, whether your allergies are triggered by pollens, insects (dust mites or cockroaches), animal dander, molds and mildew, weather changes, or something else.

    Nasal steroids Oral antihistamines Nasal antihistaminesLeukotriene modifiersMast cell stabilizers

    Allergy shots – immunotherapy – may help in severe cases. This treatment involves weekly shots of increasingly higher solutions of the offending allergens. Allergy shots take time to be effective and are usually administered over a period of 3 to 5 years.

    Symptoms: Fatigue, dizziness, feeling cold, crankiness Anemia is the most common blood condition in the U.S. It affects more than 5.6% of Americans. For women in their childbearing years, anemia is a common cause of fatigue. This is especially true for women who have heavy menstrual cycles, uterine fibroid tumors, or uterine polyps,

    Anemia is a condition in which you don’t have enough red blood cells. It can happen for many reasons. For instance, it may be the result of hemorrhoids or GI problems such as ulcers, or cancer, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs ) such as ibuprofen or aspirin can also lead to GI problems and bleeding.

    You might be interested:  Rib Back Pain

    Other causes of anemia include a lack of iron, folic acid, or vitamin B12, Chronic diseases such as diabetes or kidney disease can also cause anemia, To confirm a diagnosis of anemia, your doctor will give you a blood test. If iron deficiency is the cause of your fatigue, treatment may include iron supplements,

    You can also add iron-rich foods such as spinach, broccoli, and red meat to your diet to help relieve symptoms. Vitamin C with meals or with iron supplements can help the iron to be better absorbed and improve your symptoms. Symptoms: Sadness; feeling hopeless, worthless, and helpless; fatigue Sometimes, depression or anxiety is at the root of chronic fatigue.

    Depression affects twice as many women as men and often runs in families. It commonly begins between the ages of 15 and 30. Postpartum depression can happen after the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter, with feelings of fatigue and sadness. Major depression is also one part of bipolar disorder,

    With depression, you might be in a depressed mood most of the day. You may have little interest in normal activities. Along with feelings of fatigue, you may eat too much or too little, over- or under-sleep, feel hopeless and worthless, and have other serious symptoms.

    Agitation Trouble sleeping Worrying too muchFeeling “on alert” most of the timeFeeling of impending doomNervousness

    If you are depressed or have regular symptoms of anxiety, talk to your doctor and get a physical exam, If there is no physical cause for the depression or anxiety, your doctor may talk with you about treatment options, and may refer you to a psychiatrist or psychologist for a psychological evaluation.

    Although the specific causes of depression and/or anxiety are unclear, these are highly treatable medical problems. Medication, psychotherapy, or a combination of the two can help relieve symptoms. Symptoms: Fatigue, fever, head or body aches. Fatigue can be a symptom of infections ranging from the flu to HIV.

    If you have an infection, you’ll probably have other symptoms like fever, head or body aches, shortness of breath, or appetite loss. (They’ll vary depending on what infection you have.) Infections that may cause fatigue include:

    Flu Mononucleosis COVID-19Cytomegalovirus Hepatitis HIV Pneumonia

    Treating the infection often relieves your fatigue. But some infections, including mononucleosis and COVID-19, can lead to long-lasting tiredness. Symptoms: Chronic fatigue, deep muscle pain, painful tender points, sleep problems, anxiety, depression Fibromyalgia is one of the more common causes of chronic fatigue and musculoskeletal pain, especially in women.

    Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome are considered separate but related disorders. They share a common symptom: severe fatigue that greatly interferes with people’s lives. With fibromyalgia, you may feel that no matter how long you sleep, it’s never restful. And you may feel as if you are always fatigued during daytime hours.

    Your sleep may be interrupted by frequent waking. Yet, you may not remember any sleep disruptions the next day. Some people with fibromyalgia live in a constant “fibro fog” – a hazy feeling that makes it hard to concentrate. Constant daytime fatigue with fibromyalgia often results in people not getting enough exercise.

    • That causes a decline in physical fitness,
    • It can also lead to mood-related problems.
    • The best way to offset these effects is to try to exercise more.
    • Exercise has tremendous benefits for sleep, mood, and fatigue.
    • If you do try swimming (or any moderate exercise) to ease fatigue, start slowly.
    • As you become accustomed to the added physical activity, you can increase your time in the pool or gym.

    Set up a regular time for exercise. Avoid overdoing it, which could add to your fatigue. Symptoms: Fatigue, sleepiness, continued exhaustion Although food is supposed to give you energy, medical research suggests that hidden food intolerances – or allergies – can do the opposite.

    1. In fact, fatigue may be an early warning sign of food intolerance or food allergy,
    2. Celiac disease, which happens when you can’t digest gluten, may also cause fatigue.
    3. Ask your doctor about the elimination diet.
    4. This is a diet in which you cut out certain foods linked to a variety of symptoms, including sleepiness within 10 to 30 minutes of eating them, for a certain period of time to see if that makes a difference.

    You can also talk to your doctor about a food allergy test – or invest in a home test such as ALCAT – which may help you identify the offending foods. Symptoms: Fatigue from an activity that should be easy If you’re exhausted after an activity that used to be easy – for example, walking up the steps – it may be time to talk to your doctor about the possibility of heart disease,

    • Heart disease is the leading cause of death in women.
    • If your fatigue is related to your heart, medication or treatments can usually help correct the problem, cut the fatigue, and restore your energy.
    • Symptoms: Fatigue, morning stiffness, joint pain, inflamed joints Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a type of inflammatory arthritis, is another cause of excessive fatigue.

    Because joint damage can result in disability, early and aggressive treatment is the best approach for rheumatoid arthritis, Medications that may be used early in mild RA include:

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)

    Other drugs used in more serious forms of RA include the anti-cytokine therapies (anti- tumor necrosis factor alpha agents), as well as shots and other forms of treatment. Other autoimmune disorders, such as lupus and Sjogren’s disease, may also cause fatigue.

    1. Symptoms: Chronic fatigue, feeling exhausted upon awakening, snoring Sleep disorders are a group of conditions that disrupt or prevent restful, restorative sleep.
    2. That can take a toll on your health and quality of life, so it’s important to look out for signs and symptoms.
    3. Sleep apnea is one of the most common sleep disorders.

    If you or your partner notices loud snoring and you wake up tired and stay that way, you could have sleep apnea, More than one-third of adults in the U.S. snore at least a few nights a week. But if the snoring stops your breathing for seconds at a time, it could be sleep apnea,

    Learn more about the best sleep positions and see if sleeping on your stomach is bad or not. Obstructive sleep apnea causes low blood oxygen levels. That’s because blockages prevent air from getting to the lungs, The low oxygen levels also affect how well your heart and brain work. Sometimes, the only clue that you might have sleep apnea is chronic fatigue.

    Your doctor may prescribe a medical device called CPAP that helps keep your airways open while you sleep. In severe cases of sleep apnea, surgery may help. The surgeon will remove tissues that are blocking the airways. If left untreated, sleep apnea can increase your risk of a stroke or heart attack,

    Insomnia : You can’t get to sleep or stay asleep through the night. Narcolepsy : You feel extremely sleepy during the day and may fall asleep suddenly. Restless legs syndrome (RLS): Your legs feel uncomfortable and you have an urge to move them as you fall asleep. REM sleep behavior disorder: You act out dreams in your sleep with talking, walking, or swinging your arms.

    Talk with your doctor about a sleep study (polysomnogram) to find out if you have a sleep disorder. Lose weight if you are overweight, and if you smoke, stop. Both obesity and smoking are risk factors for sleep apnea, Sleeping on your side instead of your back may help stop mild sleep apnea.

    • Symptoms: Extreme fatigue, increased thirst and hunger, more urination, unusual weight loss The incidence of type 2 diabetes is rising in children and adults in the U.S.
    • If you have symptoms of type 2 diabetes, call your doctor and ask to be tested.
    • While finding out you have diabetes may be frightening, type 2 diabetes can be self-managed with guidance from your doctor.

    Treatment for type 2 diabetes may include:

    Losing excess weight Increasing physical activity Maintaining strict blood glucose controlTaking diabetes medications ( insulin or other drugs)Eating a low glycemic index carbohydrate diet, or, though controversial, a low- carbohydrate diet

    Other lifestyle measures are important if you want to stay well with type 2 diabetes, They include quitting smoking, controlling your blood pressure, and reducing your cholesterol, Symptoms: Extreme fatigue, sluggishness, feeling run-down, depression, cold intolerance, weight gain The problem may be a slow or underactive thyroid,

    This is known as hypothyroidism, The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland that sits at the base of your neck. It helps set the rate of metabolism, which is the rate at which the body uses energy. According to the American Thyroid Foundation, about 17% of all women will have a thyroid disorder by age 60.

    And most won’t know it. The most common cause is an autoimmune disorder known as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Hashimoto’s stops the gland from making enough thyroid hormones for the body to work the way it should. The result is hypothyroidism, or a slow metabolism,

    Blood tests known as T3 and T4 will detect thyroid hormones. If these hormones are low, synthetic hormones (medication) can bring you up to speed, and you should begin to feel better fairly rapidly. If you have been diagnosed with cancer, fatigue is often part of the disease itself or a side effect of some treatments.

    Cancer-related fatigue is far more severe than feeling tired if you don’t have cancer. You might feel too tired to move around, and you may also feel weak. It can happen with the more common types of cancer (such as lung cancer, colon cancer, or breast cancer ); with the rarer types, such as cancers of the brain and spinal cord; and with blood cancers, which include leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma,

    • If you haven’t been diagnosed with cancer, feeling very tired can be a symptom, but there are many other more likely causes.
    • If you have other symptoms, or if your fatigue doesn’t ease after you get more rest and make other lifestyle changes, see your doctor and tell them how you are feeling.
    • Many physical and mental illnesses, as well as lifestyle factors, can cause your fatigue, and that can make it hard to diagnose.

    In some cases, it might be something simple and easy to fix, like having caffeine at bedtime. But other causes, like heart disease or COPD, are serious, and you may need to start long-term treatment right away. Your doctor can help you sift through your health issues, as well as diet, exercise, and other lifestyle habits, in order to zero in on the cause and help you on the road to recovery.

    Can PCOS make you not feel good?

    Introduction – Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age. The estimate prevalence is 5-24% in different populations ( 1, 2 ). PCOS is characterized by large ovaries, menstrual irregularities, clinical and biochemical hyperandrogensim.

    It is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, lipid disorders, an ovulatory infertility and endometrial cancer ( 1, 3 ). There are several studies assessing the impact of symptoms and treatment of PCOS patients on their life quality ( 1, 4 – 6 ). Hirsutism, acne, alopecia and infertility can lead to diminished “feminine identity” and psychological stress in these patients ( 1, 7 – 9 ).

    Women with PCOS are at an increased risk for depression and anxiety disorders ( 1, 8, 9 ). Several studies have revealed diminished quality of life (QOL) in PCOS patients. Women with PCOS and their partners are less satisfied with their sex life ( 4, 7, 10, 11 ).

    Alterations in the physical and aesthetic standard (hirsutism, obesity, acne, and alopecia) and an imbalance of sexual hormones are consequently observed, which can lead to a loss of quality of life and to the sexuality of the patients, a greater prevalence of mood disorders, such as major depression and bipolar disorder (,, ).

    Both the mood disorders and their medicinal treatments are deleterious for the sexual function (, ). The greater part of the studies specifically directed to the evaluation of the sexuality of patients with PCOS refers to the psychosexuality or to sexual orientation ( 18 – 20 ).

    Studies that go profoundly into the sexual function of patients with PCOS were rare. Changes in physical appearance associated with PCOS may lead to decreased sexual satisfaction ( 21 ). Therefore, we studied the associations between Body Mass Index (BMI), and hirsutism on sexual functioning in this population of PCOs infertile women.

    A sexual problem, or sexual dysfunction, refers to a problem during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity and resulting from physical, social, and psychological factors ( 22 ).

    Epidemiological studies in the United States have estimated that Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) affected 43% of women in the general population over the past 12 months” ( 23 ). “In the United Kingdom, 5.8% of women have reported recent sexual dysfunction, and 15.5% have reported lifelong sexual dysfunction” ( 24 ).

    The rate of FSD for middle aged women in Latin America; it is approximately 58% ( 25 ). For the first time we evaluated the FSFI in Iranian PCOS patients. The sexual function index (SFI) questionnaire measures the sexual function in women. It assesses specific domains of sexual functioning including desire, sexual arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain ( 26 ).

    1. In view of multiple factors that can impair the sexual function of these patients, it would seem essential to evaluate the importance of this problem and the main factors related to it.
    2. With this purpose, a study was set up, to investigate the sexual function of patients with PCOS.
    3. Furthermore, the main clinical characteristics potentially related with sexual dysfunction (SDy) were also investigated.

    Herein we evaluated the FSFI for the first time in such patients. We also investigated the possible associated factors in PCOS with different domains of sexual functioning.