How To Treat Wet Cough

0 Comments

How To Treat Wet Cough
Self-help – If you have a productive cough, try the following self-help measures:

drink plenty of fluids, which can help thin the mucus and make it easier to cough up; take a hot, steamy shower to help break down the mucus (phlegm) and make it easier to cough up; and get plenty of rest.

If you are a smoker, giving up smoking will help.

What is the best medicine for wet cough?

1. Cofsils Naturals Cough Syrup Bottle 100 Ml – Made of natural, herbal constituents, this cough syrup soothes the soreness in the throat. It is beneficial for people suffering from chest congestion. It is made with herbal ingredients like tulsi, banapsha, haldi and others to provide quick relief without causing any side effects.

  • The presence of tulsi in the cough syrup is good for your immunity. It acts as a natural protector from cough and cold.
  • Haldi or curcumin is well known for its anti-inflammatory properties and bioactive compounds with medicinal properties.
  • Banapsha herb is good for various respiratory tract disorders such as dry cough, sore throat, hoarseness and bronchitis.

How long should a wet cough last?

Most of the time, wet coughs are related to infections of the upper respiratory tract or sinuses, and they tend to be short-lived, typically ending in 10 to 14 days. The common cold, which peaks around this time of year, is one of the top causes of a wet cough.

What will dry up a wet cough?

Treatments to improve cough efficiency and clear phlegm – Some of the treatments below help improve cough efficiency. Others decrease mucus in the back of the throat, thereby reducing the need to cough. Expectorants and mucolytics Expectorants and mucolytics are medications that thin the mucus and make it less sticky.

  • This makes it easier for people to cough it up.
  • These medications work best for people who have a wet cough but are having difficulty getting the phlegm up.
  • Airway clearance devices Airway clearance devices, such as the oscillating positive expiratory pressure (PEP) device, use pressure and vibration to help shift phlegm from the airways during exhalation.

This helps improve cough efficiency. A 2014 review investigated the efficacy of PEP therapy in the treatment of stable bronchiectasis. The review included seven studies involving a total of 146 participants. The researchers found that PEP therapy improved cough effectiveness and sputum expectoration compared with no treatment.

  • Gargling with salt water Gargling with salt water is an easy home remedy that may help alleviate a wet cough.
  • The salt water may decrease mucus in the back of the throat, thereby reducing the need to cough.
  • A range of different salt water recipes are available.
  • Most, including that of the American Dental Association, recommend mixing half a teaspoon of salt with 8 ounces of warm water.

People should consider gargling this a few times per day to reduce phlegm.

Is a wet cough the end of a cold?

A productive (‘wet’ or chesty) cough is when you have a cough that produces mucus or phlegm (sputum). You may feel congested and have a ‘rattly’ or ‘tight’ chest. Symptoms are often worse when waking up from sleep and when talking. The wet cough may be the last symptom left after a common cold infection. Depending on the cause of your productive cough, other symptoms may include:

breathlessness; fever ; cold and flu symptoms; wheeze; and chest pain.

Does honey help a wet cough?

Is it true that honey calms coughs better than cough medicine does? – Answer From Pritish K. Tosh, M.D. Drinking tea or warm lemon water mixed with honey is a time-honored way to soothe a sore throat. But honey alone may be an effective cough suppressant, too.

In one study, children ages 1 to 5 with upper respiratory tract infections were given up to 2 teaspoons (10 milliliters) of honey at bedtime. The honey seemed to reduce nighttime coughing and improve sleep. In fact, in the study, honey appeared to be as effective as a common cough suppressant ingredient, dextromethorphan, in typical over-the-counter doses.

Since honey is low-cost and widely available, it might be worth a try. However, due to the risk of infant botulism, a rare but serious form of food poisoning, never give honey to a child younger than age 1. And remember: Coughing isn’t all bad. It helps clear mucus from your airway.

Is it better to cough up phlegm or swallow it?

Mucus: The Warrior – If your body was a nightclub, mucus would be the bouncer—located at all entrances and ready to kick out anyone causing trouble. When a sickness-causing agent like a virus or bacteria enters your body, the cells that produce mucus kick into a higher gear and pump out more of the slimy stuff, which then picks up the germs.

Mucus usually clears itself out of the body as we’ve discussed, but sometimes it needs a little help. Coughing and blowing your nose are the best ways to help mucus fight the good fight. “Coughing is good,” Dr. Boucher says. “When you cough up mucus when you are sick, you are essentially clearing the bad guys—viruses or bacteria—from your body.” For that reason, Dr.

Boucher does not recommend taking a cough suppressant medication. If your mucus is dry and you are having trouble coughing it up, you can do things like take a steamy shower or use a humidifier to wet and loosen the mucus. When you do cough up phlegm (another word for mucus) from your chest, Dr.

Is Covid a wet or dry cough?

COVID-19 is a respiratory condition caused by a coronavirus. Some people are infected but don’t notice any symptoms (doctors call that being asymptomatic). Most people will have mild symptoms and get better on their own. But some will have severe problems, such as trouble breathing,

Fever or chillsA dry cough and shortness of breathFeeling very tiredMuscle or body achesHeadacheA loss of taste or smellSore throatCongestion or runny noseNausea or vomitingDiarrhea

These symptoms can start anywhere from 2 to 14 days after you’re in contact with the virus. Call a doctor or hospital right away if you have any of these issues:

Trouble breathing Constant pain or pressure in your chestBluish lips or faceSudden confusionHaving a hard time staying awake

If you have any of these, you need medical care as soon as possible, so call your doctor’s office or hospital before you go in, This will help them prepare to treat you and protect medical staff and other people. Strokes have also been reported in some people who have COVID-19. Remember FAST:

Face. Is one side of the person’s face numb or drooping? Is their smile lopsided? Arms. Is one arm weak or numb? If they try to raise both arms, does one arm sag? Speech. Can they speak clearly? Ask them to repeat a sentence. Time. Every minute counts when someone shows signs of a stroke. Call 911 right away.

The antiviral drug remdesivir ( Veklury ) has been approved by the FDA for use in hospitalized people. Molnupiravir ( Lagevrio ) and nirmatrelvir with Ritonavir ( Paxlovid ) have been given emergency use authorization for treating COVID-19 and should be given orally as soon as possible.

Pinkeye Swollen eyes FaintingGuillain-Barre syndrome Coughing up blood Blood clotsSeizures Heart problemsKidney damage Liver problems or damage

Some doctors have reported rashes tied to COVID-19, including purple or blue lesions on children’s toes and feet. Researchers are looking into these reports so they can understand the effect on people who have COVID-19. Researchers say kids have many of the same COVID-19 symptoms as adults, but they tend to be milder.

FeverCoughShortness of breath

Some children and teens who are in the hospital with COVID-19 have an inflammatory syndrome that may be linked to the coronavirus. Doctors call it pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome (PMIS). Symptoms include a fever, a rash, belly pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and heart problems.

You’ve had symptoms of the virusYou’ve come into close contact with a person who has COVID-19 (take a test at least 5 days after you last saw the individual)You’ve been asked to get tested by your school, health care provider, workplace, state, local, tribal, or territorial health department (regardless of your vaccination status)

Your regular body temperature may be higher or lower than someone else’s. It also changes throughout the day. Doctors generally consider a fever in an adult to be anything over 100.4 F on an oral thermometer and over 100.8 F on a rectal thermometer. If you think you’ve come into contact with the virus, or if you have symptoms, isolate yourself and check your temperature every morning and evening for at least 10 days.

Stay home unless you need medical care. If you do need to go in, call your doctor or hospital first for guidance.Tell your doctor about your illness. If you’re at high risk of complications because of your age or other health conditions, they might have more instructions. Isolate yourself, This means staying away from other people as much as possible, even members of your family. Stay in a specific “sick room,” and use a separate bathroom if you can.Wear a face mask if you have to be around anyone else. This includes people you live with. If a mask makes it hard for you to breathe, keep at least 6 feet from others and cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze. After that happens, wash your hands with soap for at least 20 seconds. The CDC states that well-fitting respirator masks (like N95s and KN95s) give better protection than cloth masks.Rest up, and drink plenty of fluids. Over-the-counter medicines might help you feel better.Keep track of your symptoms. If they get worse, get medical help right away.

You might be interested:  What Is The Strongest Essential Oil For Pain

Dyspnea is the word doctors use for shortness of breath. It can feel like you:

Have tightness in your chestCan’t catch your breathCan’t get enough air into your lungs Can’t breathe deeplyAre smothering, drowning, or suffocatingHave to work harder than usual to breathe in or outNeed to breathe in before you’re done breathing out

You should monitor your oxygen levels, and if they dip into the 80s, contact your doctor. If your face and/or lips get a bluish tint, call 911 right away.

Cold vs. Flu vs. Allergies vs. COVID-19
Sym ptoms Cold Flu Allergies COVID-19 (can range from moderate to severe)
Fever Rare High (100-102 F), Can last 3-4 days Never Common
Headache Rare Intense Uncommon Common
General aches, pains Slight Usual, often severe Never Common
Fatigue, weakness Mild Intense, can last up to 2-3 weeks Sometimes Common
Extreme exhaustion Never Usual (starts early) Never Can be present
Stuffy/runny nose Common Sometimes Common Has been reported
Sneezing Usual Sometimes Usual Has been reported
Sore throat Common Common Sometimes Has been reported
Cough Mild to moderate Common, can become severe Sometimes Common
Shortness of breath Rare Rare Rare, except for those with allergic asthma In more serious infections

Several COVID-19 vaccines are available, and they’re the best way to protect yourself and those around you unless your doctor advises otherwise. Full vaccination lowers your chances of getting COVID-19. The most accessible vaccines in the U.S. are:

Pfizer: available for adults and children over the age of 6 months, primary series requires two doses, 3 weeks apart; those 6 months and older will receive a 3rd dose 8 weeks after the second dose.Moderna: available for ages 6 months and up, primary series requires two doses a month apart; everyone ages 2 and older should get a booster dose 5 months after the last dose in their primary series. A bivalent booster dose is recommended for children aged 6 months–4 years who completed the Moderna primary series and if it has been at least 2 months since their last dose. Novavax: available for those 12 and older, it requires two doses given three to eight weeks apart. Novavax can be used as a booster in people aged 12 years or older if no other COVID-19 vaccine brand is suitable for that person Johnson & Johnson: available for ages 18 and up, requires one dose; everyone ages 18 years and older should get a booster dose of either Pfizer or Moderna at least 2 months after the first dose of Johnson & Johnson

Talk with your doctor before getting the vaccine if you have immune system issues. The CDC recently said there’s a clinical preference for people to get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (either the Pfizer or Moderna one) or Novavax’s protein-based vaccine over the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine.

  • This recommendation came after the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) discussed the latest data on vaccine effectiveness, vaccine safety, rare adverse side effects, and U.S.
  • Vaccine supply.
  • But the ACIP also said that any vaccine is better than no vaccine and the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine is still an option.

In addition, in the fall of 2022, CDC recommended a bivalent mRNA COVID-19 vaccine booster dose for persons aged 5 years and older to help combat the Omicron variant. The shot is administered at least 2 months after completing the primary series or after receipt of a monovalent booster dose.

The CDC also approved a bivalent booster for children aged 6 months–4 years who completed the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine primary series And an updated (bivalent) Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine also became available on December 9, 2022, for children aged 6 months–4 years to complete the primary series.

Until you’re vaccinated, be sure to take these steps to prevent COVID-19:

Wash your hands often, for at least 20 seconds each time, with soap and water,Use an alcohol-based sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol if you don’t have soap and water handy.Limit your contact with other people. Stay at least 6 feet away from others if you have to go out.Wear a well-fitted protective face mask in public places. Avoid people who are sick,Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth unless you’ve just washed your hands.Regularly clean and disinfect surfaces that you touch a lot.

If you’re taking care of someone who’s sick, follow these steps to protect yourself:

Limit your contact as much as you can. Stay in separate rooms. If you have to be in the same room, use a fan or an open window to improve airflow.Ask the person who’s sick to wear a well-fitted protective face mask when you’re around each other. You should wear one, too.Don’t share items like electronics, bedding, or dishes.Use gloves when handling the other person’s dishes, laundry, or trash. When you’re done, throw away the gloves and wash your hands.Regularly clean and disinfect common surfaces such as doorknobs, light switches, faucets, and countertops.Take care of yourself. Get enough rest and nutrition. Watch for COVID-19 symptoms.

Can a wet cough turn to pneumonia?

So you’ve been coughing for a while, and instead of getting better, it seems like your cough is getting worse. Maybe you’ve even started coughing up phlegm or have pain in your chest when you cough. Those are signs your cough might actually be pneumonia.

Does wet cough need antibiotics?

A wet cough is often a sign of a bacterial or viral infection. Most causes won’t require treatment. Available treatments include medications and lifestyle changes, some of which aren’t appropriate for children. Coughing is a symptom of many conditions and illnesses.

  • It’s your body’s way of responding to an irritant in the respiratory system.
  • When irritants like allergens, dust, pollution, or smoke enter your airways, specialized sensors send a message to your brain, and your brain is alerted to their presence.
  • Your brain then sends a message through the spinal cord to the muscles in your chest and abdomen.

When these muscles rapidly contract, it pushes a burst of air out through your respiratory system. This burst of air, or cough, helps push out harmful irritants. Coughing is an important reflex that can help remove harmful irritants that may sicken you or make it harder to breathe.

When you’re ill, a cough can also move mucus (phlegm) and other secretions out of your body to help you clear your airways, breathe easier, and heal faster. A wet cough, also known as a productive cough, is any cough that produces mucus. It may feel like you have something stuck in your chest or the back of your throat.

Sometimes a wet cough will bring mucus into your mouth. A wet cough indicates that your body is producing more mucus than normal. Did you know? Coughing is often worse at night because mucus collects at the back of your throat when you lie down, further triggering your cough reflex.

Wet coughs most often result from infections by microorganisms, such as bacteria or viruses, This includes the microorganisms that cause a cold or the flu, Your entire respiratory system is lined with mucous membranes. Mucus performs many beneficial functions in your body, like keeping your airways moist and protecting your lungs from irritants.

When you’re dealing with an infection like the flu, however, your body produces more mucus than usual, It does this to help trap and expel the organisms causing infection. Coughing helps you get rid of all the excess mucus that gets stuck in your lungs and chest.

Bronchitis: Bronchitis is inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the tubes that carry air into your lungs. Acute bronchitis is typically brought on by a variety of viruses. Chronic bronchitis is an ongoing condition, often caused by smoking. Pneumonia: Pneumonia is a lung infection that’s caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. It’s a condition that ranges in severity from mild to life threatening. COPD: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a group of conditions that damage both your lungs and bronchial tubes. Smoking is the number one cause of COPD. Cystic fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a genetic condition of the respiratory system. It’s usually diagnosed during early childhood. It causes the production of thick, sticky mucus in the lungs and other organs. All 50 U.S. states screen infants for cystic fibrosis at the time of birth. Asthma: Although people with asthma are more likely to have a dry cough, a small subset of people produce ongoing excess mucus and experience a chronic wet cough. Learn more about the asthma cough. Pulmonary edema: Pulmonary edema is fluid buildup in the lungs. It’s usually caused by heart failure and is a very common cause of wet cough. If you have pulmonary edema, you may cough up pink, frothy phlegm,

In children, coughs are caused by a viral infection most of the time. Asthma may also result in a cough. All other causes of wet cough in children, such as the following, are rare:

Whooping cough: Whooping cough presents in violent attacks of uncontrollable coughing. Children make a “whoop” sound as they gasp for air. Inhalation: Cough in children is sometimes caused by inhaling a foreign body, cigarette smoke, or other environmental irritants. Pneumonia: Pneumonia can be dangerous in newborns and young children.

To diagnose your cough, your doctor will first need to know how long it’s been going on and how severe the symptoms are. Most coughs can be diagnosed with a simple physical exam, If your cough is long lasting or severe, or you have other symptoms like fever, weight loss, and fatigue, a doctor may want to order additional tests. Additional testing may include:

chest X-rays lung function tests bloodwork sputum analysis, which is a microscopic look at mucus pulse oximetry test, which measures the amount of oxygen in your blood arterial blood gas test, which tests a blood sample from an artery to show the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your blood, along with your blood chemistry

Treatments for a wet cough depend on what’s causing it. For the majority of wet coughs caused by a virus, such as a cold or the flu, treatment is unnecessary. Viruses must simply run their course. Bacterial causes require antibiotics, If you are or your child is having trouble sleeping, you may want to use something to help lessen mucus and cough.

An older 2012 study has shown that 10 grams (about 1/2 tablespoon) of honey before a child’s bedtime is a safe method to try. Keep in mind that raw honey isn’t suitable for children under 12 months old due to the risk of botulism. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that children younger than 2 years should not be given over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medications.

Other possible treatments for wet cough can include:

You might be interested:  Pain In My Gums

OTC cough medications for older children and adults prescription cough medications (with or without codeine, which isn’t recommended in cough medications for people under age 18)acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) for body aches and chest discomfort from cough bronchodilators steroids for coughs related to asthmaallergy medicationsantibiotics for bacterial infectionsmedications for pulmonary edema, such as diuretics and medications that can help with the heart pumpingmoist air, delivered by humidifier or steam

Consult a doctor if your cough has been going on for more than 2 weeks, You may need immediate medical attention if you’re having trouble breathing or coughing up blood, or notice a bluish skin tone, Mucus with a foul smell can also be a sign of a more serious infection. Call the doctor immediately if your child:

is younger than 3 months and has a fever of 100.4ºF (38ºC) or higher is younger than 2 years and has a fever of 100.4ºF (38ºC) or higher for more than 1 dayis older than 2 years and has a fever of 100.4ºF (38ºC) or higher for more than 3 dayshas a fever over 104ºF (40ºC)has wheezing without a history of asthmais crying and can’t be comfortedis difficult to wakehas a seizure has a fever and rash

Wet coughs are most often caused by minor infections. If your cough has been going on for 2 weeks or more, see a doctor. More serious causes are possible. Treatment for your cough will depend on the cause. Since most coughs are caused by viruses, they will go away on their own with time.

Does a wet cough mean pneumonia?

In your everyday life, you might toss around terms like “wet” and “dry” to describe your preferred style of martini or food you feed your pets. But these adjectives also describe the type of cough you’re dealing with. According to the American Lung Association, a wet or productive cough is a type of cough that brings up mucus, which can be clear, white, yellow, green, or brown, Meilan Han, MD, a University of Michigan professor of internal medicine and spokesperson for the American Lung Association, told Health,

  • An unproductive or dry cough, on the other hand, is phlegm-free, Janette Nesheiwat, MD, a family and emergency medicine doctor and the medical director for New York City-based CityMD, told Health,
  • Learn the symptoms, potential causes, treatment options, and how it differs from a dry cough.
  • Getty Images The mucus plays a major role in how your cough feels.

Wet coughs generally occur when there’s inflammation within the lungs, causing an increase in mucus production, said Dr. Han. In some cases, you may even have trouble breathing due to the extra phlegm, Dr. Han added. With a dry cough, however, you might notice a tickling sensation in your throat before you start coughing, and it may feel dry or irritated afterward.

  • The sound of your cough can also tell you if it’s wet or dry.
  • A wet cough typically sounds like something’s rattling in your chest.
  • If your healthcare professional listens to your lungs with a stethoscope, they might hear crackles, wheezing, or rales—as well as small clicking, bubbling, or rattling sounds when you inhale, said Dr.

Nesheiwat. A dry cough, meanwhile, can come with a hoarse or “hacking” sound. As defined by the American Lung Association, in general, a cough is your body’s way of removing irritating substances, such as smoke, dust, or chemicals, out of your airway, said Dr.

  1. Han. In the case of wet coughs, the irritant your body wants to expel is mucus since having too much phlegm in the lungs can cause shortness of breath.
  2. The common cause of mucus build-up is inflammation or irritation due to a viral or bacterial infection, explained Dr.
  3. Nesheiwat.
  4. More specifically, acute wet coughs, which come about suddenly and last less than three weeks, may be brought on by a viral illness, such as the flu, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), COVID-19, or the common cold, said Dr.

Nesheiwat. According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, infections such as bacterial and viral pneumonia cause the air sacs in the lung to get filled with pus or fluid and can result in rattling, wet coughs. These infections can also result in bronchitis, according to the American Lung Association, which is an inflammation of the lining of the bronchial tubes that often develops after a cold or respiratory infection clears, added Dr.

  • Han. On the other hand, wet coughs lasting at least eight weeks are considered chronic, as defined by the American Lung Association, and can be the result of chronic bronchitis.
  • One common cause of chronic bronchitis is cigarette smoking, said Dr. Han.
  • The American Lung Association states that bronchiectasis, a condition sometimes marked by irreversible damage to the walls of the bronchial tubes, can also bring on a wet cough.

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, bronchiectasis is linked with cystic fibrosis, but people with certain immunodeficiency or autoimmune disorders or chronic lung conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may also be at risk, Dr.

  • Han said. The best course of action for your wet cough depends on the cause.
  • Phlegmy coughs brought on by acute viral infections should improve on their own in a few weeks.
  • Taking over-the-counter medications containing expectorants, such as the ingredient guaifenesin, make the mucus easier to cough up by thinning out the mucus, according to the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus,

Some home remedies might help ease the cough, too. “I like to recommend to my patients hot tea with honey, a hot mist humidifier, and cough drops,” said Dr. Nesheiwat. The antioxidant-rich tea can reduce inflammation, the honey may help ease the cough, and the humidifier may thin out your mucus, Dr.

Nesheiwat explained. To ease wet coughs caused by chronic bronchitis, your healthcare professional may suggest taking cough suppressants before bedtime so you can snooze peacefully through the night. If you also have allergies, asthma, or COPD, they may recommend the use of an inhaler to curb the inflammation and open the narrow passages in your lungs.

If your wet cough isn’t improving or gets worse after a few weeks, reach out to a healthcare provider. Also, let them know if your stubborn cough is paired with wheezing, fever, and/or chills. An X-ray may be needed to check for pneumonia, which can be serious for some older adults and people with heart failure or chronic lung problems.

  • If you’re dealing with a bacterial infection, your healthcare professional may prescribe antibiotics to treat it, said Dr.
  • Nesheiwat.
  • Preventing a wet cough means safeguarding yourself as best as possible from respiratory infections. Dr.
  • Nesheiwat pointed out a few simple steps to reduce your risk.
  • We can prevent infection by getting your flu shot, your COVID shot, and your booster if eligible,” Dr.

Nesheiwat said. “Keep your hands washed and clean, and wear your mask indoors in crowded public areas with poor ventilation.”

What does a bronchitis cough sound like?

What Is a Bronchitis Cough Like? – A bronchitis cough sounds like a rattle with a wheezing or whistling sound. As your condition progresses, you will first have a dry cough that can then progress towards coughing up white mucus. If you have a bacterial infection or your airways become irritated and swollen, the color of your mucus changes from white to green or yellow.

Is a wet cough contagious?

While the cough itself isn’t contagious, the germs the cough spreads can be. Whether visible or not, each time someone coughs, particles are spread into the air. Therefore, although you won’t immediately catch a cough from a person coughing, you can certainly catch an illness from the germs spreading through the air.

Will bronchitis go away on its own?

Most people DO NOT need antibiotics for acute bronchitis caused by a virus. The infection will almost always go away on its own within 1 week. Doing these things may help you feel better: Drink plenty of fluids.

Is Covid cough wet and mucus?

How COVID-19 Impacts Lungs – COVID-19 is the illness caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. It infects the cells that line the airways, specifically the mucous membranes. These membranes produce mucus that trap irritants in the airways and help your body expel them through coughing.

  • A dry or wet cough
  • Trouble breathing
  • Chest congestion

A dry cough with COVID-19 is more common than a cough with mucus (about 50% to 70% of patients have a dry cough). Dry cough can become a wet cough over time in the later stages of the illness. When the COVID virus enters the lungs, inflammation leads to increased phlegm that collects in the airways.

Depending on the individual, this phlegm could cause a more severe COVID case, including damaged lung tissue and secondary bacterial infection. In severe COVID-19 cases, this could bring pneumonia, an infection in one or both of the lungs. This is usually what causes breathing difficulties in COVID-19 infections as the pneumonia causes swelling and fluid build-up in the lungs.

It may require treatment in the hospital with oxygen or a ventilator to take over breathing. With COVID, these severe cases can cause lasting lung damage and lingering cough or breathing difficulties that can take months to recover from.

Is bronchitis worse at night?

Frequently Asked Questions –

  • When will my bronchitis symptoms go away? Non-cough symptoms of acute bronchitis (stuffy nose, fever, headache, fatigue) typically last only a few days. A cough may linger for up to two to three weeks. Chronic bronchitis is a life-long condition in which you’ll have periodic episodes of symptoms that last at least three months at a time.
  • What triggers bronchitis symptoms? The gradual accumulation of mucus in the lining of the bronchi (airways) is responsible for triggering bronchitis symptoms, including the characteristic cough of bronchitis. At first, the cough is likely to be dry, but as the mucus builds up, the cough becomes productive and brings up excess mucus.
  • Why does my bronchitis seem worse at night? Your cough from bronchitis may be worse at night because the airways tend to be more sensitive and prone to irritation when the airway muscles are relaxed. You may also feel more congested and stuffed up because mucus can pool in your upper respiratory tract when you’re lying down.
  • What other conditions cause symptoms similar to those of bronchitis?
  • Is bronchitis contagious? No, chronic bronchitis is not contagious, but a separate viral or bacterial infection of the respiratory tract that leads to acute bronchitis can be.
  • What causes a wheezing, dry cough? A wheezing, dry cough can be caused by asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), vocal cord dysfunction, bronchitis, pneumonia, and various allergic reactions and infections that narrow the airways.
You might be interested:  Left Upper Hand Pain

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Kinkade S, Long NA. Acute Bronchitis, Am Fam Physician.2016;94(7):560-565.
  2. American Academy of Family Physicians. Acute bronchitis,
  3. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Bronchitis,
  4. Cedars-Sinai. Acute Bronchitis in Children,
  5. Earwood JS, Thompson TD. Hemoptysis: evaluation and management, Am Fam Physician,2015;91(4):243‐249.
  6. American Academy of Family Physicians. Chronic bronchitis,
  7. Kinkade S, Long NA. Acute bronchitis, Am Fam Physician,2016;94(7):560-565.
  8. American Lung Association. Chronic bronchitis,
  9. KidsHealth. The Nemours Foundation. Coughing,

Additional Reading

  • Benscoter DT. Bronchiectasis, Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease and Protracted Bacterial Bronchitis. Curr Probl Pediatr Adolesc Health Care.2018. pii: S1538-5442(18)30030-0. doi: 10.1016/j.cppeds.2018.03.003
  • Mejza F, Gnatiuc L, Buist AS, et al. Prevalence and burden of chronic bronchitis symptoms: results from the BOLD study, Eur Respir J.2017;50(5). pii: 1700621. doi: 10.1183/13993003.00621-2017

By Kristina Duda, RN Kristina Duda, BSN, RN, CPN, has been working in healthcare since 2002. She specializes in pediatrics and disease and infection prevention. Thanks for your feedback!

What should you avoid when you have a wet cough?

Histamine Dense foods –

Histamines are produced by the body to get rid of harmful particles, including allergens. This chemical works by triggering the body to make more mucus. This makes the runny or stuffy nose. Hence, a person who is already suffering from cough and cold should avoid foods that are rich in histamines.

    Why is my wet cough worse in the morning?

    Chesty cough – Otherwise known as a wet cough or phlegmy cough, this makes a person’s chest feel heavy and the cough brings up mucus or phlegm. Each cough can produce a clump of mucus and therefore these types of cough are called ‘productive coughs’. Chesty coughs are caused by viruses from colds and flu and they can happen after a sore throat.

    Does wet cough need antibiotics?

    A wet cough is often a sign of a bacterial or viral infection. Most causes won’t require treatment. Available treatments include medications and lifestyle changes, some of which aren’t appropriate for children. Coughing is a symptom of many conditions and illnesses.

    1. It’s your body’s way of responding to an irritant in the respiratory system.
    2. When irritants like allergens, dust, pollution, or smoke enter your airways, specialized sensors send a message to your brain, and your brain is alerted to their presence.
    3. Your brain then sends a message through the spinal cord to the muscles in your chest and abdomen.

    When these muscles rapidly contract, it pushes a burst of air out through your respiratory system. This burst of air, or cough, helps push out harmful irritants. Coughing is an important reflex that can help remove harmful irritants that may sicken you or make it harder to breathe.

    When you’re ill, a cough can also move mucus (phlegm) and other secretions out of your body to help you clear your airways, breathe easier, and heal faster. A wet cough, also known as a productive cough, is any cough that produces mucus. It may feel like you have something stuck in your chest or the back of your throat.

    Sometimes a wet cough will bring mucus into your mouth. A wet cough indicates that your body is producing more mucus than normal. Did you know? Coughing is often worse at night because mucus collects at the back of your throat when you lie down, further triggering your cough reflex.

    Wet coughs most often result from infections by microorganisms, such as bacteria or viruses, This includes the microorganisms that cause a cold or the flu, Your entire respiratory system is lined with mucous membranes. Mucus performs many beneficial functions in your body, like keeping your airways moist and protecting your lungs from irritants.

    When you’re dealing with an infection like the flu, however, your body produces more mucus than usual, It does this to help trap and expel the organisms causing infection. Coughing helps you get rid of all the excess mucus that gets stuck in your lungs and chest.

    Bronchitis: Bronchitis is inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the tubes that carry air into your lungs. Acute bronchitis is typically brought on by a variety of viruses. Chronic bronchitis is an ongoing condition, often caused by smoking. Pneumonia: Pneumonia is a lung infection that’s caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. It’s a condition that ranges in severity from mild to life threatening. COPD: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a group of conditions that damage both your lungs and bronchial tubes. Smoking is the number one cause of COPD. Cystic fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a genetic condition of the respiratory system. It’s usually diagnosed during early childhood. It causes the production of thick, sticky mucus in the lungs and other organs. All 50 U.S. states screen infants for cystic fibrosis at the time of birth. Asthma: Although people with asthma are more likely to have a dry cough, a small subset of people produce ongoing excess mucus and experience a chronic wet cough. Learn more about the asthma cough. Pulmonary edema: Pulmonary edema is fluid buildup in the lungs. It’s usually caused by heart failure and is a very common cause of wet cough. If you have pulmonary edema, you may cough up pink, frothy phlegm,

    In children, coughs are caused by a viral infection most of the time. Asthma may also result in a cough. All other causes of wet cough in children, such as the following, are rare:

    Whooping cough: Whooping cough presents in violent attacks of uncontrollable coughing. Children make a “whoop” sound as they gasp for air. Inhalation: Cough in children is sometimes caused by inhaling a foreign body, cigarette smoke, or other environmental irritants. Pneumonia: Pneumonia can be dangerous in newborns and young children.

    To diagnose your cough, your doctor will first need to know how long it’s been going on and how severe the symptoms are. Most coughs can be diagnosed with a simple physical exam, If your cough is long lasting or severe, or you have other symptoms like fever, weight loss, and fatigue, a doctor may want to order additional tests. Additional testing may include:

    chest X-rays lung function tests bloodwork sputum analysis, which is a microscopic look at mucus pulse oximetry test, which measures the amount of oxygen in your blood arterial blood gas test, which tests a blood sample from an artery to show the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your blood, along with your blood chemistry

    Treatments for a wet cough depend on what’s causing it. For the majority of wet coughs caused by a virus, such as a cold or the flu, treatment is unnecessary. Viruses must simply run their course. Bacterial causes require antibiotics, If you are or your child is having trouble sleeping, you may want to use something to help lessen mucus and cough.

    An older 2012 study has shown that 10 grams (about 1/2 tablespoon) of honey before a child’s bedtime is a safe method to try. Keep in mind that raw honey isn’t suitable for children under 12 months old due to the risk of botulism. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that children younger than 2 years should not be given over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medications.

    Other possible treatments for wet cough can include:

    OTC cough medications for older children and adults prescription cough medications (with or without codeine, which isn’t recommended in cough medications for people under age 18)acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) for body aches and chest discomfort from cough bronchodilators steroids for coughs related to asthmaallergy medicationsantibiotics for bacterial infectionsmedications for pulmonary edema, such as diuretics and medications that can help with the heart pumpingmoist air, delivered by humidifier or steam

    Consult a doctor if your cough has been going on for more than 2 weeks, You may need immediate medical attention if you’re having trouble breathing or coughing up blood, or notice a bluish skin tone, Mucus with a foul smell can also be a sign of a more serious infection. Call the doctor immediately if your child:

    is younger than 3 months and has a fever of 100.4ºF (38ºC) or higher is younger than 2 years and has a fever of 100.4ºF (38ºC) or higher for more than 1 dayis older than 2 years and has a fever of 100.4ºF (38ºC) or higher for more than 3 dayshas a fever over 104ºF (40ºC)has wheezing without a history of asthmais crying and can’t be comfortedis difficult to wakehas a seizure has a fever and rash

    Wet coughs are most often caused by minor infections. If your cough has been going on for 2 weeks or more, see a doctor. More serious causes are possible. Treatment for your cough will depend on the cause. Since most coughs are caused by viruses, they will go away on their own with time.

    Should I be worried about a wet cough?

    It may or may not be the sign of a bacterial infection. A long-lasting wet cough can lead to a serious chest infection. So if your child has a wet cough, it’s best to go ahead and call your pediatrician. If the cough is from a bacterial infection, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics.

    How do you get the mucus out of your lungs?

    Breathe in slowly and gently through your nose, and repeat the coughing if you need to. So when it’s hard to breathe because of mucus in your lungs, you have three things you can do to help move the mucus out: postural drainage, chest percussion, and controlled coughing.

    Does wet cough spread?

    While the cough itself isn’t contagious, the germs the cough spreads can be. Whether visible or not, each time someone coughs, particles are spread into the air. Therefore, although you won’t immediately catch a cough from a person coughing, you can certainly catch an illness from the germs spreading through the air.