Male Endurance Care And Cure Drops

0 Comments

Male Endurance Care And Cure Drops
German’s Male Endurance Care and Cure Drop is a well-tested homoeopathic formulation that increases penile blood flow. It helps to sustain the erection for longer, increase sex drive, improve testosterone levels and balance sex hormone. The product also increases libido and sperm count. Key Ingredients:

Testiculus

Prostrate

Damiana

Acidum Phosphoricum

Crataegus Oxyacantha

Cydonia Vulgaris

Ginseng

Selenium

Excipient

Alcohol Content

Key Benefits:

Increases penile blood flow

Sustains the erection for longer

Increases sex drive

Improves testosterone levels

Balances sex hormones

Improves libido and sperm count

Directions For Use: Use as directed. Safety Information:

Read the label carefully before use

Store in a cool and dry place away from direct sunlight

Keep out of reach of the children

What is German prosta care and cure drops used for?

German’s Prosta Care and Cure Drop is an ideal homoeopathic remedy for acute and chronic prostatitis and painful micturition. It is made with potent ingredients and is safe. Key Ingredients:

Chimaphila Umbellata

Clematis Erecta

Conium Maculatum

Ferrum Picrin

Pareira Brava

Populus Tremuloides

Pulsatilla Nigricans

Sabal Serrulata

Ethanol and Purified Water

Alcohol Content

Key Benefits:

Made with potent ingredients

Relieves painful and burning micturition

Helps with acute and chronic prostatitis

Directions For Use: Use as directed. Safety Information:

Read the label carefully before use

Store in a cool and dry place away from direct sunlight

Keep out of reach of the children

What is testosterone 30 used for in homeopathy?

Testosterone Tablet TESTOSTERONE – testosterone, tablet Apotheca Company Disclaimer: This homeopathic product has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration for safety or efficacy. FDA is not aware of scientific evidence to support homeopathy as effective.

  1. ACTIVE INGREDIENTS: Testosterone 30X.
  2. INDICATIONS: For temporary relief of sexual debility from nervous prostration, for enhancing sexual function, nervous exhaustion causing lack of sexual desire.
  3. WARNINGS: Not intended for persons under the age of 18.
  4. If pregnant or breast-feeding, do not use Consult a health professional prior to use if you have any pre-existing medical conditions or take any prescription medications.

Do not consume with any caffeine or stimulants. Improper use will not improve results and is potentially hazardous to a person’s health. Use only as directed. Keep out of reach of children. In case of overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away.

Do not use if tamper evident seal is broken or missing. To report a serious adverse event or obtain product information, please call 1-866-607-2768. DIRECTIONS: Adults take 1-2 tablets daily. Read warnings and use only as directed. INACTIVE INGREDIENTS: Creatine monohydrate, Croscarmellose sodium, Magnesium stearate, Mucrocrystalline cellulose, Silicon dioxide, Stearic acid.

KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. In case of overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away. INDICATIONS: For temporary relief of sexual debility from nervous prostration, for enhancing sexual function, nervous exhaustion causing lack of sexual desire.

  • Developed by and manufactured for:
  • Zoe Processing
  • 4180 Pletezer Blvd.
  • Rootstown, OH 44272

WWW.TESTOSTERONERX.COM

  1. Testosterone Tablets
  2. IUPAC Name: 17-hydroxy-10, 13-dimethyl-1,2,6,7,8,9,11,12,14,15,16,17-dodecahydrocyc iopentaphenanthren-3-one
  3. CAS Number: 58-22-0
  4. Chemical Formula: C19H2802
  5. Homeopathic
  6. 50 Tablets
  • Revised: 6/2011
  • Apotheca Company

: Testosterone Tablet

What is male endurance care and cure drops used for?

German’s Male Endurance Care and Cure Drop is a well-tested homoeopathic formulation that increases penile blood flow. It helps to sustain the erection for longer, increase sex drive, improve testosterone levels and balance sex hormone. The product also increases libido and sperm count. Key Ingredients:

Testiculus

Prostrate

Damiana

Acidum Phosphoricum

Crataegus Oxyacantha

Cydonia Vulgaris

Ginseng

Selenium

Excipient

Alcohol Content

Key Benefits:

Increases penile blood flow

Sustains the erection for longer

Increases sex drive

Improves testosterone levels

Balances sex hormones

Improves libido and sperm count

Directions For Use: Use as directed. Safety Information:

Read the label carefully before use

Store in a cool and dry place away from direct sunlight

Keep out of reach of the children

Do German men use condoms?

; Grttner, K M ; Kliem, S ; Vasterling, I ; Strauss, B ; Krger, C –

Article Authors Figures & Tables References Metrics Citations

Background : There have not been any population-based surveys in Germany to date on the frequency of various types of sexual behavior. The topic is of interdisciplinary interest, particularly with respect to the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections.

Methods : Within the context of a survey that dealt with multiple topics, information was obtained from 2524 persons about their sexual orientation, sexual practices, sexual contacts outside relationships, and contraception. Results : Most of the participating women (82%) and men (86%) described themselves as heterosexual.

Most respondents (88%) said they had engaged in vaginal intercourse at least once, and approximately half said they had engaged in oral intercourse at least once (either actively or passively).4% of the men and 17% of the women said they had been the receptive partner in anal intercourse at least once.5% of the respondents said they had had unprotected sexual intercourse outside their primary partnership on a single occasion, and 8% said they had done so more than once; only 2% of these persons said they always used a condom during sexual intercourse with their primary partner.

Among persons reporting unprotected intercourse outside their primary partnership, 25% said they had undergone a medical examination afterward because of concern about a possible sexually transmitted infection. Conclusion : Among some groups of persons, routine sexual-medicine examinations may help contain the spread of sexually transmitted infections.

One component of such examinations should be sensitive questioning about the types of sexual behavior that are associated with a high risk of infection. Information should be provided about the potential modes of transmission, including unprotected vaginal, oral, and anal intercourse outside the primary partnership. Sexual health is a state of physical, emotional, mental and social wellbeing in relation to sexuality, and not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity ( 1 ). According to the World Health Organization ( 2 ), sexual health is closely linked to wellbeing and quality of life.

  • To consider sexual health in the setting of health policy and identify risks in the healthcare system, representative data on the sexual behavior over the lifespan are crucial.
  • With regard to German peoples sexual lives, only very few scientific studies are available, and these focus mostly on specific subgroupsamong others, homosexual men ( e1 ), adolescents ( e2 ), and students ( e3 ).

For the general German population, data on sexual behavior based on a representative sample have thus far not been collected. Such studies have, however, been conducted in other countries (for example, the US, the UK, Australia, Sweden) ( 3 5, e4, e5 ).

In the age group 2544 years, vaginal intercourse was reported to be the most common practice (98% of women, 97% of men ( 3 ). Rates of oral intercourse were 89% in women versus 90%) in men ( 3 ), and rates of anal intercourse 36% in women and 44% in men ( 3 ). Reported rates of same-sex contacts were 12% in women and 6% in men ( 3 ).

According to German-language cohort studies, 1526% of women and 1732% of men reported sexual contacts outside their current steady relationship (see for an overview). An online survey found rates of 4% for homosexual women and 34% for homosexual men, 29% for heterosexual women and 49% for heterosexual men ( 7 ). Box Cinical Implications Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) present an interdisciplinary challenge. Incidence rates of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV: 3200 incident infections in 2015, 95% confidence interval ) and non-notifiable STIs ( Chlamydia trachomatis, gonorrhea) have remained constant in Germany in recent years ( 8, 9 ), whereas the incidence of syphilis has steadily risen since 2010 (8.5 cases per 100 000 population in 2015) ( 10 ).

The rise in new cases of infection is based primarily on increased numbers of reports of men who have sex with men (MSM) ( 10 ). Since no current epidemiological data are available, it is not possible to estimate the incidence rates of genital herpes (Herpes simplex viruses, HSV-1, HSV-2) and HPV infections (human papillomaviruses).

Due to the increasing uptake of the HPV vaccine, it may be assumed that the prevalence rates of these STIs have fallen in recent years ( e6 e8 ). STIs can cause neonatal harms (for example, owing to genital herpes), lead to genital and extragenital neoplasms (for example, as a result of HPV infection), or cause infertility (as a result of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis ) ( 11, 12 ).

  1. Transmission routes of STIs include unprotected vaginal, anal, and oral intercourse ( 13 ).
  2. Because of inconsistent use of condoms during sexual contacts outside the main relationship while simultaneously dispensing with condoms within the relationship, clandestine sexual contacts outside the relationship are seen as a transmission route for STIs to spread ( 14, 15 ).

Similarly, unwanted pregnancies in the context of unprotected sexual intercourse are of relevance: in addition to contraceptive failure and non-compliance, unprotected sexual intercourse is the reason why interceptive drugs are prescribed. About 13% of women have used an interceptive at least once ( 16 ).

  1. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of different sexual behaviors on the basis of a sample that is representative for age and sex.
  2. This furnishes persons working in the healthcare system with an information base that may be useful when taking a sexual history, preventing and treating STIs, treating sexual dysfunctions, or delivering sex education.

Methods Sociodemographic data were collected nationwide by means of face to face interviews on site. Subsequently, study subjects were given a questionnaire to complete independently, which asked questions on sexual orientation, relationships, contraception, sexual behavior, and sexual contacts outside existing relationships.

A total of 2524 persons were interviewed, 45% of these were men and 55% women ( Table 1 ). Before the data evaluation, the researchers conducted plausibility tests on the basis of the complete data sets. By using weighted adjustments, each case was weighted; consequently the sample matched the German population for the combination of characteristics age and sex and place of residence by federal state.

A detailed description of the data collection, measuring instruments, and evaluation can be found in the Supplementary material. Results Sexual orientation Most women (82%) and men (86%) described themselves as exclusively heterosexual ( Table 1 ). Heterosexual attraction (men: mean = 3.78; 95% confidence interval ; women: mean = 3.25 ) was much more common than attraction to a person of the same sex (men: mean = 1.16 ; women: mean = 1.25 ; as measured on a 5-point Likert scale: 1 = never/not at all, 5 = very strongly). Table 1 Sociodemographic data Relationships 57% of those interviewed reported being in a stable relationship at the time of the survey. Altogether, subjects tended to be satisfied with their relationships. Of the 57% of subjects in stable relationships, 40% had a monogamous relationship, 2% an open relationship, and 1% had agreed to have relationships including a third partner.56% had not negotiated any agreement regarding contacts with third partners.

Contraception Of the 57% of subjects in stable relationships, 76% reported that they never used condoms within their relationship, 12% reported occasional condom use, 3% frequent condom use, and 6% reported that they always used a condom.4% did not answer the question. Of the women of childbearing age (≤ 50 years), 51% reported that they were taking oral contraceptives, 17% used other kinds of contraception.5% did not use any contraception as they wanted to have children; 27% reported that they did not think about using contraception.7% had taken interceptives for the purpose of postcoital contraception; 3% had taken an interceptive more than once.8% did not answer the question.

Sexual behaviors Table 2, Figure 1, and eTable 1 provide an overview of reported sexual behaviors in men and women. Detailed reported rates of sexual practices by sex and age are shown in eTables 15, Figure 1 Frequency of sexual practices Table 2 Frequency of sexual practices in the past year eTable 1 Frequency of sexual practices eTable 2 Response rates eTable 3 Sociodemographic data eTable 4a Age specific data on the sexual practices of men eTable 4b Age specific data on the sexual practices of men eTable 5a Age specific data on the sexual practices of women eTable 5b Age specific data on the sexual practices of women Sexual contacts outside relationships 17% of those interviewed reported ever having had sexual intercourse with someone other than their partner while being in a steady relationship.5% did not did not answer the question.

More men (21%) than women (15%) answered in the affirmative when asked if they had had sexual contacts outside their relationships (χ 2 = 17 972, p = 0.001). Persons who had had sexual contacts outside their relationships reported a mean of 3.65 other sexual partners (range = 1199; 95% confidence interval ) in addition to their primary partners; 40 persons did not answer the question.7% reported having had sex outside their current relationship; 4% did not answer the question.

Differences between the sexes reached significance (χ 2 = 4724, p = 0.030): more men (8%) than women (6%) reported having sexual contacts outside their current primary relationships. Persons who had had sexual contacts outside their current relationships reported a mean of 2.71 other sexual partners (range = 120 ) during that relationship; 10 persons did not give an answer regarding the number.8% of men (n = 89) reported contacts with a mean of 4.06 female prostitutes.

You might be interested:  How To Cure Nerve Weakness

Very few men (0.01%; n = 8) reported sexual contacts outside their relationships with a mean of 2.38 male prostitutes. Women were not asked for sexual contacts with prostitutes as the researchers were wary of the risk of dropouts from the study as a result of such questions. Unprotected sexual intercourse 82% of study participants reported never having had unprotected sex outside their primary relationship, 5% reported having had unprotected sex once, and 8% reported more than one occurrence.

Of those who had had unprotected sex outside their relationship, 16% had sought out a subsequent medical examination for fear of having contracted an STI once and 9% more than once; 74% reported that they had not had any examination; 1% did not answer the question.

Only 2% of those who had had unprotected sex outside their relationships always used condoms during sex with their steady partner.38% reported never using condoms in their primary relationship, and 7% reported using condoms occasionally; 3% reported using condoms often. On the basis of the assumption that STIs may be associated with the number of lifetime sexual partners, we determined a subgroup with an increased risk for STIs (n = 35 men, n = 27 women), who had reported sexual contacts outside their current relationship, unprotected sexual intercourse outside, and inconsistent condom use within, their relationship.

Men from this high-risk group reported a mean of 38 female sexual partners, women reported a mean of 17 male sexual partners ( Figure 2 ). The number of sexual partners in the high-risk group was three times as high as in persons who did not meet all the listed criteria (normal population).

  1. Of those persons who had reported sexual contacts with prostitutes (n = 93), 36% reported never using condoms with their primary partners.
  2. Only 4% each reported using condoms occasionally, often, or always.
  3. Half of those who reported sexual contact with prostitutes reported having had unprotected sex outside their relationship (once: 18%; more than once: 33%).

The data do not convey any information on the occurrence or frequency of unprotected sex with prostitutes. Figure 2 Mean lifetime number of sexual partners Discussion Subjects aged 2529 were the most sexually active age group, as was also shown by a previous study ( 4 ). Increasing age was observed to be accompanied by a decreased frequency in sexual activity; the causes may be the length of the relationship ( 17 ) as well as aging (for example, as a result of falling testosterone concentrations) ( e9 ).

Similar to the results from research from the US and the UK to date ( 3, 5 ), the responses from men and women differed regarding the numbers of their sexual partners. Self-serving biases and gender-specific responding behavior may have contributed to the differing responses. As far as we know the reasons for these differing responses have not been investigated to date.

Data from questionnaire surveys have also not been validated on the basis of behavioral data. Compared with earlier, non-representative studies, fewer subjects reported active or passive oral intercourse, and the same was true for insertive and receptive anal intercourse.

  • This may be because of cultural differences ( 3, 4 ) or online based data collections ( 18 ).
  • The proportion of persons who reported having sexual contacts outside their relationship was low compared with earlier studies ( 6, 7 ).
  • Many partners therefore seemed to be true to the widespread desire for faithful relationships ( e10 ).

Because of the random selection of the sample and the independent completion of the questionnaires it can be assumed that the data are less prone to biases and the rates shown are more reliable than in other studies. It is of particular relevance that participants reported having had unprotected sex outside their primary relationships, and of these, only 2% reported using condoms at all times within their relationship.

In a scenario of changing sexual partners and inconsistent condom use, regular sexual medical examinations are recommended, because STIs will otherwise remain undetected at first ( 19 ). Only one in four of those who answered in the affirmative about having unprotected sexual intercourse outside their steady relationship had undergone a relevant medical examination.

Simultaneously, some persons displayed behaviors (external contacts, unprotected sexual intercourse outside their relationships, inconsistent condom use, a higher lifetime number of sexual partners) that are to be considered as at risk with regard to STIs.

If one considers that more than 80% of 18- to 40-year-olds reported in another survey that they had never been comprehensively asked about their sexuality when they had contact with physicians (Brenk-Franz K, Strau B : The medical care of persons with sexual dysfunction), our results underline the necessity of exploring in detail high-risk behaviors and of providing factual and structured education for the prevention of STIs.

In addition, the guideline ( 20 ) recommends that the HPV (types 16 and 18) vaccine be given to girls for cancer prevention as early as possible. Whether vaccination at a later dateespecially after the start of sexual activityis indicated should be decided on an individual basis ( 20 ).

  • A detailed sexual history is helpful and required in this setting.
  • The results should be viewed while considering the composition of the sample.
  • Participants mainly reported being heterosexual.
  • The proportion of homosexual subjects was consistent with the proportions reported in other German-language publications ( 21 ).

The proportion of those who reported same-sex sexual partners (58%) was lower than in studies from the US (10%; ) and UK (716%; ). Because of the small subsample sizes, no conclusions were possible with regard to specific subgroups (for example, those with a homosexual identity).

  1. To this end, a disproportional number of such subgroups compared with the total population would have been required in the sample (oversampling).
  2. For reasons of economy we also dispensed with capturing data on body image and satisfaction with the reported sexual behaviors.
  3. Similarly we were not able to find out which factors (for example, consumption of pornography) affect the sexual practices undertaken.

And neither did we focus on contraceptive use in specific sexual behaviors. For example, in orogenital sexual encounters, protective measures were used notably less often, even in case of multiple partners, because of ignorance vis-vis the risk of infection ( 22 ).

  1. Certain criteria (age, sex, place of residence) were weighted during recruitment, so that the sample largely matched the total population of Germany.
  2. However, individual reports of frequencies may be subject to bias because the willingness to answer a question varied by the subject of the question.
  3. Although a recommended computer aided self interview was used to capture sensitive data, we found many missing values (1743%).

We decided against estimating the missing data and reported confidence intervals. Self-serving memory biases and self-portrayals have to be assumed as a matter of principle in the setting of reporting sexual behaviors. As self-reported sexual behaviors are also subject to biases when using other data collection methods ( e12 ), in future, partners should be interviewed about the behaviors and experiences of their significant other, in order to validate their responses. eMethods Methods Conflict of interest statement The authors declare that no conflict of interest exists. Manuscript received on 28 November 2016, revised version accepted on 7 June 2017. Translated from the original German by Birte Twisselmann, PhD. Corresponding author Prof.

Dr. phil. Christoph Krger Universitt Hildesheim Universittsplatz 1, 3114 Hildesheim [email protected] Supplementary material For eReferences please refer to: www.aerzteblatt-international.de/ref3317 eMethods, eTables: www.aerzteblatt-international.de/17m0545 1. Weltgesundheitsorganisation: Definition Sexuelle und reproduktive Gesundheit.

www.euro.who.int/de/health-topics/Life-stages/sexual-and-reproductive-health/news/news/2011/06/sexual-health-throughout-life/definition (last accessed on 5 May 2017).3. Chandra A, Copen CE, Mosher WD: Sexual behavior, sexual attraction, and sexual identity in the United States: data from the 20062010 National Survey of Family Growth 2010; 5: 4566.4.

  1. Herbenick D, Reece M, Schick V, Sanders SA, Dodge B, Fortenberry JD: Sexual behavior in the United States: results from a national probability sample of men and women ages 1494.
  2. J Sex Med 2010; 7: 25565 CrossRef MEDLINE 5.
  3. Mercer CH, Tanton C, Prah P, et al.: Changes in sexual attitudes and lifestyles in Britain through the life course and over time: findings from the National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal).

Lancet 2013; 382: 178194 CrossRef 6. Krger C: Sexuelle Auenkontakte und -beziehungen in heterosexuellen Partnerschaften. Psychol Rundsch 2010; 61: 12343 CrossRef 7. Haversath J, Krger C: Sexuelle Auenkontakte und deren Prdiktoren bei Homo- und Heterosexuellen.

Psychother Psychosom Med Psychol 2014; 64: 45864 CrossRef MEDLINE 8. Robert Koch-Institut: Sechs Jahre STD-Sentinel Surveillance in Deutschland Zahlen und Fakten. Epid Bull 2010; 3: 207.9. Robert Koch-Institut: Schtzung der Zahl der HIV-Neuinfektionen und der Gesamtzahl von Menschen mit HIV in Deutschland.

Epid Bull 2016; 45: 498509.10. Robert Koch-Institut: Weiterer verstrkter Anstieg von Syphilis-Infektionen bei Mnnern, die Sex mit Mnnern haben. Epid Bull 2016; 50: 54760.11. Gille G, Hampl M, Kreuter A, Klussmann J, Wojcinski M, Gross G: HPV-induzierte Kondylome, Karzinome und Vorluferlsionen-eine interdisziplinre Herausforderung.

  • Dtsch med Wochenschr 2014; 139: 240510 CrossRef MEDLINE 12.
  • Wagenlehner FME, Brockmeyer NH, Discher T, Friese K, Wichelhaus TA: The presentation, diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections.
  • Dtsch Arztebl Int 2016; 113: 1122 VOLLTEXT 13.
  • Marcus U: Risiken und Wege der HIV-bertragung: Auswirkungen auf Epidemiologie und Prvention der HIV-Infektion.

Bundesgesundheitsbl 2000; 43: 44958 CrossRef 14. Johnson AM, Mercer CH, Erens B, et al.: Sexual behaviour in Britain: partnerships, practices, and HIV risk behaviours. Lancet 2001; 358: 183542 CrossRef 15. Traeen B, Holmen K, Stigum H: Extradyadic sexual relationships in Norway.

  1. Arch Sex Behav 2007; 36: 5565 CrossRef MEDLINE 16.
  2. Bundeszentrale fr gesundheitliche Aufklrung (BZgA): Reprsentativbefragungen Forschung und Praxis der Sexualaufklrung und Familienplanung.
  3. Verhtungsverhalten Erwachsener 2011: Aktuelle reprsentative Studie im Rahmen einer telefonischen Mehrthemenbefragung, 1 st edition.

Kln: BZgA 2011.17. von Sydow K, Seiferth A: Sexualitt in Paarbeziehungen. Praxis der Paar- und Familientherapie Band 8. Gttingen: Hogrefe 2015.18. Corsten C, von Rden U: Prvention sexuell bertragbarer Infektionen (STI) in Deutschland. Bundesgesundheitsbl 2013; 56: 2628 CrossRef MEDLINE 21.

Bundeszentrale fr politische Bildung: Datenreport 2016. Ein Sozialbericht fr die Bundesrepublik Deutschland. www.destatis.de/DE/Publikationen/Datenreport/Downloads/Datenreport2016.pdf?_blob=publicationFile (last accessed on 25 February 2017).22. Schffer H: Sexuell bertragbare Infektionen der Mundhhle. Hautarzt 2012; 63: 7105 CrossRef MEDLINE 23.

Stndige Impfkommission (STIKO): Empfehlungen der Stndigen Impfkommission (STIKO) am Robert Koch-Institut 2016/2017. Epid Bull 2016 (Nr.34 vom 29.08.2016). www.rki.de/DE/Content/Infekt/EpidBull/Archiv/2016/Ausgaben/34_16.pdf?_blob=publicationFile (last accessed on 5 May 2017).

E1. Deutsche AIDS-Hilfe e.V. (eds.): Schwule Mnner und HIV/AIDS: Lebensstile, Sex, Schutz- und Risikoverhalten 2010. Eine Befragung im Auftrag der Bundeszentrale fr gesundheitliche Aufklrung. www.ssoar.info/ssoar/bitstream/handle/document/34238/ssoar-2012-bochow_et_al-Schwule_Maenner_und_HIVAIDS_.pdf?sequence=1 (last accessed on 25 February 2017).

e2. Bode H, Heling A: Jugendsexualitt 2015. Die Perspektive der 14- bis 25-Jhrigen. Ergebnisse einer aktuellen reprsentativen Wiederholungsbefragung. Kln: Bundeszentrale fr gesundheitliche Aufklrung 2015. e3. Dekker A, Matthiesen S: Studentische Sexualitt im Wandel: 1966198119962012.

Z Sexualforsch 2015; 28: 24571. e4. Smith AMA, Rissel CE, Richters J, Grulich AE, de Visser RO: Sex in Australia: sexual identity, sexual attraction and sexual experience among a representative sample of adults. Aust N Z J Public Health 2003; 27: 13845 CrossRef CrossRef MEDLINE e5. Lewin B, Fugl-Meyer K, Helmius G: Sex in Sweden: about sexual life in Sweden, 1996.

Natl Inst Pub Health 1998. e6. Deler Y, Remschmidt C, Leuschner J, et al.: Human papillomavirus prevalence and probable first effects of vaccination in 20 to 25 year-old women in Germany: a population-based cross-sectional study via home-based self-sampling.

BMC Infect Dis 2014; 14: 87 CrossRef MEDLINE PubMed Central e7. Brotherton JM, Fridman M, May CL, et al.: Early effect of the HPV vaccination programme on cervical abnormalities in Victoria, Australia: an ecological study. Lancet 2011; 377: 208592 CrossRef e8. Horn J, Damm O, Kretzschmar MEE, et al.: Estimating the long-term effects of HPV vaccination in Germany.

Vaccine 2013; 31: 237280 CrossRef MEDLINE e9. Yee L: Aging and sexuality. Australian Family Physician 2010;39: 71821 MEDLINE e10. Institut fr Demoskopie Allensbach: JACOBS Krnung Studie mit der aktuellen Ausgabe. Partnerschaft 2012: Zwischen Herz und Verstand.

  1. Ergebnisse einer bevlkerungsreprsentativen Befragung.
  2. Www.jacobskroenung-studie.de/archiv#a-partnerschaft; 2012 (last accessed on 9 December 2013) e11.
  3. Vrangalova Z, Savin-Williams RC: Mostly heterosexual and mostly gay/lesbian: evidence for new sexual orientation identities.
  4. Arch Sex Behav 2012; 41: 85101 CrossRef MEDLINE e12.

Whisman MA, Snyder DK: Sexual infidelity in a national survey of American women: differences in prevalence and correlates as a function of method of assessment. J Fam Psychol 2007; 21: 14754 CrossRef MEDLINE e13. Kish L: A procedure for objective respondent selection within the household.

JASA 1949; 44: 3807 CrossRef e14. Terman L (assisted by Butterwieser P, Ferguson LW, Johnson WB, Wilson DP): Psychological factors in marital happiness. New York: McGraw-Hill 1938. *Prof. Strauss and Prof. Krger share last authorship. Department of Clinical Psychology, Psychotherapy and Diagnostics, Technical University at Brunswick: M.

Sc. Psych. Haversath, M. Sc. Psych. Grttner, Dr. rer. nat. Vasterling, PD Dr. phil. Krger The Criminological Research Institute of Lower Saxony: Dr. rer. nat. Kliem Institute of Psychosocial Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena: Prof. Box Cinical Implications Figure 1 Frequency of sexual practices Figure 2 Mean lifetime number of sexual partners Key messages Table 1 Sociodemographic data Table 2 Frequency of sexual practices in the past year eMethods Methods eTable 1 Frequency of sexual practices eTable 2 Response rates eTable 3 Sociodemographic data eTable 4a Age specific data on the sexual practices of men eTable 4b Age specific data on the sexual practices of men eTable 5a Age specific data on the sexual practices of women eTable 5b Age specific data on the sexual practices of women

You might be interested:  Ear Pain Icd 10
1. Weltgesundheitsorganisation: Definition Sexuelle und reproduktive Gesundheit. www.euro.who.int/de/health-topics/Life-stages/sexual-and-reproductive-health/news/news/2011/06/sexual-health-throughout-life/definition (last accessed on 5 May 2017).
2. World Health Organization: Defining sexual health. Report of a technical consultation on sexual health, 2831 January 2002, Geneva. www.who.int/reproductivehealth/topics/gender_rights/defining_sexual_health.pdf ; 2006 (last accessed on 5 October 2016).
3. Chandra A, Copen CE, Mosher WD: Sexual behavior, sexual attraction, and sexual identity in the United States: data from the 20062010 National Survey of Family Growth 2010; 5: 4566.
4. Herbenick D, Reece M, Schick V, Sanders SA, Dodge B, Fortenberry JD: Sexual behavior in the United States: results from a national probability sample of men and women ages 1494. J Sex Med 2010; 7: 25565 CrossRef MEDLINE
5. Mercer CH, Tanton C, Prah P, et al.: Changes in sexual attitudes and lifestyles in Britain through the life course and over time: findings from the National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal). Lancet 2013; 382: 178194 CrossRef
6. Krger C: Sexuelle Auenkontakte und -beziehungen in heterosexuellen Partnerschaften. Psychol Rundsch 2010; 61: 12343 CrossRef
7. Haversath J, Krger C: Sexuelle Auenkontakte und deren Prdiktoren bei Homo- und Heterosexuellen. Psychother Psychosom Med Psychol 2014; 64: 45864 CrossRef MEDLINE
8. Robert Koch-Institut: Sechs Jahre STD-Sentinel Surveillance in Deutschland Zahlen und Fakten. Epid Bull 2010; 3: 207.
9. Robert Koch-Institut: Schtzung der Zahl der HIV-Neuinfektionen und der Gesamtzahl von Menschen mit HIV in Deutschland. Epid Bull 2016; 45: 498509.
10. Robert Koch-Institut: Weiterer verstrkter Anstieg von Syphilis-Infektionen bei Mnnern, die Sex mit Mnnern haben. Epid Bull 2016; 50: 54760.
11. Gille G, Hampl M, Kreuter A, Klussmann J, Wojcinski M, Gross G: HPV-induzierte Kondylome, Karzinome und Vorluferlsionen-eine interdisziplinre Herausforderung. Dtsch med Wochenschr 2014; 139: 240510 CrossRef MEDLINE
12. Wagenlehner FME, Brockmeyer NH, Discher T, Friese K, Wichelhaus TA: The presentation, diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2016; 113: 1122 VOLLTEXT
13. Marcus U: Risiken und Wege der HIV-bertragung: Auswirkungen auf Epidemiologie und Prvention der HIV-Infektion. Bundesgesundheitsbl 2000; 43: 44958 CrossRef
14. Johnson AM, Mercer CH, Erens B, et al.: Sexual behaviour in Britain: partnerships, practices, and HIV risk behaviours. Lancet 2001; 358: 183542 CrossRef
15. Traeen B, Holmen K, Stigum H: Extradyadic sexual relationships in Norway. Arch Sex Behav 2007; 36: 5565 CrossRef MEDLINE
16. Bundeszentrale fr gesundheitliche Aufklrung (BZgA): Reprsentativbefragungen Forschung und Praxis der Sexualaufklrung und Familienplanung. Verhtungsverhalten Erwachsener 2011: Aktuelle reprsentative Studie im Rahmen einer telefonischen Mehrthemenbefragung, 1 st edition. Kln: BZgA 2011.
17. von Sydow K, Seiferth A: Sexualitt in Paarbeziehungen. Praxis der Paar- und Familientherapie Band 8. Gttingen: Hogrefe 2015.
18. Corsten C, von Rden U: Prvention sexuell bertragbarer Infektionen (STI) in Deutschland. Bundesgesundheitsbl 2013; 56: 2628 CrossRef MEDLINE
19. Bremer V, Brockmeyer N, Coenenberg J: S1-Leitlinie STI/STD-Beratung, Diagnostik und Therapie (2015). www.awmf.org/uploads/tx_szleitlinien/059006l_S1_STI_STD-Beratung_201507.pdf (last accessed on 7 March 2017).
20. Gross G, Becker N, Brockmeyer NH, et al.: S3-Leitlinie Impfprvention HPV-assoziierter Neoplasien (2013). www.awmf.org/uploads/tx_szleitlinien/082002k_Impfprvention_HPV_assoziierter_Neoplasien_201312.pdf (last accessed on 7 March 2017).
21. Bundeszentrale fr politische Bildung: Datenreport 2016. Ein Sozialbericht fr die Bundesrepublik Deutschland. www.destatis.de/DE/Publikationen/Datenreport/Downloads/Datenreport2016.pdf?_blob=publicationFile (last accessed on 25 February 2017).
22. Schffer H: Sexuell bertragbare Infektionen der Mundhhle. Hautarzt 2012; 63: 7105 CrossRef MEDLINE
23. Stndige Impfkommission (STIKO): Empfehlungen der Stndigen Impfkommission (STIKO) am Robert Koch-Institut 2016/2017. Epid Bull 2016 (Nr.34 vom 29.08.2016). www.rki.de/DE/Content/Infekt/EpidBull/Archiv/2016/Ausgaben/34_16.pdf?_blob=publicationFile (last accessed on 5 May 2017).
e1. Deutsche AIDS-Hilfe e.V. (eds.): Schwule Mnner und HIV/AIDS: Lebensstile, Sex, Schutz- und Risikoverhalten 2010. Eine Befragung im Auftrag der Bundeszentrale fr gesundheitliche Aufklrung. www.ssoar.info/ssoar/bitstream/handle/document/34238/ssoar-2012-bochow_et_al-Schwule_Maenner_und_HIVAIDS_.pdf?sequence=1 (last accessed on 25 February 2017).
e2. Bode H, Heling A: Jugendsexualitt 2015. Die Perspektive der 14- bis 25-Jhrigen. Ergebnisse einer aktuellen reprsentativen Wiederholungsbefragung. Kln: Bundeszentrale fr gesundheitliche Aufklrung 2015.
e3. Dekker A, Matthiesen S: Studentische Sexualitt im Wandel: 1966198119962012. Z Sexualforsch 2015; 28: 24571.
e4. Smith AMA, Rissel CE, Richters J, Grulich AE, de Visser RO: Sex in Australia: sexual identity, sexual attraction and sexual experience among a representative sample of adults. Aust N Z J Public Health 2003; 27: 13845 CrossRef CrossRef MEDLINE
e5. Lewin B, Fugl-Meyer K, Helmius G: Sex in Sweden: about sexual life in Sweden, 1996. Natl Inst Pub Health 1998.
e6. Deler Y, Remschmidt C, Leuschner J, et al.: Human papillomavirus prevalence and probable first effects of vaccination in 20 to 25 year-old women in Germany: a population-based cross-sectional study via home-based self-sampling. BMC Infect Dis 2014; 14: 87 CrossRef MEDLINE PubMed Central
e7. Brotherton JM, Fridman M, May CL, et al.: Early effect of the HPV vaccination programme on cervical abnormalities in Victoria, Australia: an ecological study. Lancet 2011; 377: 208592 CrossRef
e8. Horn J, Damm O, Kretzschmar MEE, et al.: Estimating the long-term effects of HPV vaccination in Germany. Vaccine 2013; 31: 237280 CrossRef MEDLINE
e9. Yee L: Aging and sexuality. Australian Family Physician 2010;39: 71821 MEDLINE
e10. Institut fr Demoskopie Allensbach: JACOBS Krnung Studie mit der aktuellen Ausgabe. Partnerschaft 2012: Zwischen Herz und Verstand. Ergebnisse einer bevlkerungsreprsentativen Befragung. www.jacobskroenung-studie.de/archiv#a-partnerschaft; 2012 (last accessed on 9 December 2013)
e11. Vrangalova Z, Savin-Williams RC: Mostly heterosexual and mostly gay/lesbian: evidence for new sexual orientation identities. Arch Sex Behav 2012; 41: 85101 CrossRef MEDLINE
e12. Whisman MA, Snyder DK: Sexual infidelity in a national survey of American women: differences in prevalence and correlates as a function of method of assessment. J Fam Psychol 2007; 21: 14754 CrossRef MEDLINE
e13. Kish L: A procedure for objective respondent selection within the household. JASA 1949; 44: 3807 CrossRef
e14. Terman L (assisted by Butterwieser P, Ferguson LW, Johnson WB, Wilson DP): Psychological factors in marital happiness. New York: McGraw-Hill 1938.

ul> Mazziotta, Agostino Familiendynamik, 2020 10.21706/fd-45-4-308 Kranz, Dirk Frontiers in Psychology, 2021 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.711988 Tomori, Damilola Victoria; Horn, Johannes; Rübsamen, Nicole; Kleine Bardenhorst, Sven; Kröger, Christoph; Jaeger, Veronika K.; Karch, André; Mikolajczyk, Rafael Frontiers in Epidemiology, 2022 10.3389/fepid.2022.858789 Hahn, Andreas; Kröger, Christoph; Meyer, Christian G.; Loderstädt, Ulrike; Meyer, Thomas; Frickmann, Hagen; Zautner, Andreas Erich International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2020 10.3390/ijerph17155504 Hahn, Andreas; Frickmann, Hagen; Loderstädt, Ulrike Antibiotics, 2021 10.3390/antibiotics10080929 Garz, Maria; Schröder, Johanna; Nieder, Timo; Becker, Inga; Biedermann, Sarah; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Briken, Peer; Auer, Matthias; Fuß, Johannes Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 2021 10.1080/0092623X.2021.1888831 Íncera-Fernández, Daniel; Román, Francisco J.; Gámez-Guadix, Manuel International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2022 10.3390/ijerph19116387 Döring, Nicola; Poeschl, Sandra The Journal of Sex Research, 2020 10.1080/00224499.2019.1578329 Dennert, Gabriele Book, 2022 10.1007/978-3-031-06585-9_11 Voegele, Pascal; Polenz, Wolf Journal of Public Health, 2023 10.1007/s10389-023-01876-7

Sexual Behavior in Germany

Is ED Curable without Viagra?

Erectile dysfunction is a common experience. It is often possible to reverse it, either with or without medication. Relaxation techniques and pelvic floor exercises may help, and medical treatment is also available. Most males experience at least one episode of being unable to achieve an erection when desired.

  • In extreme cases, they may be unable ever to have or sustain an erection.
  • Erectile dysfunction (ED) is very common, affecting an estimated 30 million men in America.
  • Most cases of ED occur in men who were previously able to sustain an erection.
  • The condition is usually reversible, but the chances of completely curing ED depend on the underlying cause.

Read on to learn about natural and medicinal ways to reverse ED. In many cases, yes, erectile dysfunction can be reversed. A study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found a remission rate of 29 percent after 5 years. It is important to note that even when ED cannot be cured, the right treatment can reduce or eliminate symptoms.

Primary ED occurs when a man has never been able to have or sustain an erection. This is rare. Secondary ED occurs in people who once had regular erectile function. This is the most common type.

Secondary ED can be reversed and is often temporary. Primary ED may require more intensive and medical-based treatments. ED is usually treatable with medication or surgery. However, a person may be able to treat the underlying cause and reverse symptoms with no medication.

The best treatment may depend on the person. Some find that traditional treatments, such as surgery or medication, do not work. These men may have success using a penis pump, which draws blood into the penis and induces an erection. Methods for reversing ED fall into three categories: Short-term treatments These help with achieving or maintaining erections but do not address the underlying cause of ED.

For example, sildenafil (Viagra) increases blood flow to the penis, which can provide short-term relief from ED. It may help people with conditions such as diabetes and atherosclerosis to get erections. Addressing the underlying cause Primary treatments address the issue that is causing ED. Share on Pinterest Psychological treatments may help to reduce anxiety and increase self-confidence. The cause of ED may be psychological, and the condition itself may lead to anxiety, Psychological treatments can reduce anxiety, increase self-confidence, and improve relationships with sexual partners.

Also, these changes may increase the odds that other treatments are effective. Some men find that intense anxiety about sex prevents certain treatments from working. Addressing this anxiety can improve overall results. See a doctor to check for any underlying health issues. ED can be the first sign of diabetes-related nerve damage, cardiovascular disease, or a neurological problem.

While the cause of ED may be physical, the condition can still have psychological effects. It may lead to self-consciousness or anxiety, which can make it more difficult to get an erection. A treatment plan may, therefore, include both physical and psychological methods.

using relaxation exercises to manage ED-related stress and control blood pressure exercising to improve blood flowlosing weight, when necessary, to lower blood pressure and improve cholesterol and testosterone levelschanging the diet, which may especially benefit people with diabetes or cardiovascular disease

2. Pelvic floor exercises The pelvic floor muscles help men to urinate and ejaculate. Strengthening these muscles may also improve erectile function. A comprehensive 2010 review found that pelvic floor exercises may help men with diabetes to get and maintain erections.

Discuss pelvic floor physical therapy with a doctor to learn which exercises are most effective.3. Counseling or couples’ therapy ED can negatively impact self-esteem. It may be difficult to talk about, but the issue is common. It is important to acknowledge and discuss ED, particularly when it causes depression or anxiety.

Individual counseling can aid in uncovering the cause of the problem. A psychologist or psychiatrist can help an individual to manage their anxiety and resolve issues, which can eliminate ED and prevent it from returning. Couples’ therapy can help sexual partners to talk through their feelings and find healthful, constructive ways to communicate about ED.4.

Herbal and alternative remedies Some men find that alternative and complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, help with ED. Preliminary research suggests that some herbal supplements may also help. A 2018 review found that ginseng preparations significantly improved symptoms of ED in the population studied.

Preparations of maritime pine extract, Pinus pinaster, and maca, Lepidium meyenii, also showed promising results, but more research is needed. Methods of alternative medicine are safest when used under the guidance of a doctor and in conjunction with other treatments.5.

Medication A wide variety of medications can help with ED. The best-known are drugs, such as tadalafil ( Cialis ) and Viagra, which increase blood flow to the penis and help to achieve an erection. These can be effective when that cause of ED is physical, and they also work well when the cause is unknown or related to anxiety.

If an underlying condition, such as diabetes, is causing ED, treating it will often reverse ED or prevent it from worsening.6. Medication changes Some medications can make ED worse. Blood pressure medication, for example, may lower blood flow to the penis, making it harder to get an erection.

  • Anyone who suspects that ED is associated with a medication should tell a doctor.
  • Alternative drugs are often available.7.
  • Mechanical devices Penis pumps can draw blood into the penis and induce an erection in most men, including those with severe nerve damage.
  • When there is severe nerve or blood vessel damage, using a ring can help to keep blood in the penis.

Even when serious physical health issues are present, a mechanical device can usually help with getting an erection.8. Surgery If other strategies are ineffective, or when there is an anatomical cause of ED, a doctor may recommend surgery. The procedure involves implanting a device that enables immediate erections.

  • Surgery is effective in most cases, and the rate of complications is less than 5 percent,
  • Some people feel frustration about ED.
  • It is important to remember that the condition is treatable.
  • ED is very common and can usually be reversed by using natural remedies or medications to treat the underlying cause.

Early intervention can often detect a serious medical condition, and determining the cause of ED early may increase the likelihood of reversing it. Speak with a doctor about the best course of treatment.

What is best to shrink prostate?

Medicines for an enlarged prostate – Taking medicine is the most common treatment for mild to moderate symptoms of an enlarged prostate. Options include:

Alpha blockers. Alpha blockers work by relaxing the smooth muscle of the bladder neck and prostate. This makes peeing easier. Alpha blockers include alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), tamsulosin (Flomax) silodosin (Rapaflo) and terazosin. They often work quickly in people with somewhat smaller prostates. Side effects might include dizziness. They also may include a harmless issue in which semen goes back into the bladder instead of out the tip of the penis. This is called retrograde ejaculation. 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. These medicines shrink the prostate. They do this by preventing hormone changes that cause the prostate to grow. Examples include finasteride (Proscar) and dutasteride (Avodart). They might take up to six months to work well and can cause sexual side effects. Combination therapy. Your health care provider might suggest that you take an alpha blocker and a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor at the same time if either medicine alone doesn’t help enough. Tadalafil (Cialis). This medicine is often used to treat erectile dysfunction. Studies suggest it also can treat an enlarged prostate.

You might be interested:  How To Treat High Porosity Hair

What are the best tablets to shrink prostate?

5-alpha reductase inhibitors – 5-alpha reductase inhibitors are used to treat larger prostate glands. They shrink the prostate gland if it’s enlarged. Finasteride and dutasteride are the two 5-alpha reductase inhibitors available.

Can homeopathy boost testosterone?

Testosterone Deficiency and Homeopathic Treatment – Bladder & Bowel Community Low testosterone, also called andropause, Low T, or testosterone deficiency is the male version of menopause. Now, it is also important to know that women can also suffer from Low T.

Homeopathy is a way to address many health concerns through natural means. Although testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is the benchmark way to improve testosterone levels, there are other options. For those interested in learning more about and homeopathic treatment, we provide some useful information.

Before you brush aside testosterone therapy, however, you should know that it is an extremely safe and effective way of increasing testosterone levels. TRT has been around for decades and is considered a bioidentical form of hormone replacement. Bioidentical means that it is biologically identical in structure to the natural hormone the body secretes.

Those who first wish to try a more natural route research low testosterone and homeopathic treatment to find herbal remedies or tinctures that may accomplish the same goal. Homeopathic medicines go straight to the root cause of the issue to bring about change. In this case, it is increasing testosterone levels.

Most forms of legitimate homeopathy are void of toxic side effects. They are safe to use and often work to stimulate testosterone production.

What is male endurance?

Sexual Stamina: The Basics – Before we get into specific ways that you can boost your sexual stamina, let’s briefly cover what sexual stamina actually is. Sexual stamina, as most people define it, is your ability to sustain sex before you need to take a break. A variety of factors can limit your sexual stamina, including:

  • Orgasm and ejaculation, For many guys, reaching orgasm and ejaculating is the main factor that limits their sexual stamina. After you ejaculate, you’ll generally need to take a break and let your refractory period pass. If you have premature ejaculation (PE), you may find it difficult to have sex for more than a few minutes before you reach orgasm and ejaculate.
  • Erectile dysfunction (ED), Sometimes, your ability to maintain an erection can interfere with your sexual performance. If you have ED, you may start to lose your erection during sex, affecting your stamina.
  • Physical exhaustion, Sex can be tiring, especially if you and your partner like to go at it hard and heavy. If your physical fitness isn’t the best, you might start to feel tired before you’re ready to reach orgasm.
  • Psychological factors, Sometimes, your mind can affect your ability to perform as well as you’d like in bed. If you’re feeling anxious, depressed or stressed, this could interfere with your sexual enjoyment and affect your stamina and performance.

Increasing your sexual stamina is all about identifying the specific factors that are limiting your enjoyment and performance in bed, then taking action to fix them.

What is endurance used for?

Endurance exercise is one of the four types of exercise along with strength, balance and flexibility, Ideally, all four types of exercise would be included in a healthy workout routine and AHA provides easy-to-follow guidelines for endurance and strength-training in its Recommendations for Physical Activity in Adults,

  1. They don’t all need to be done every day, but variety helps keep the body fit and healthy, and makes exercise interesting.
  2. You can do a variety of exercises to keep the body fit and healthy and to keep your physical activity routine exciting.
  3. Many different types of exercises can improve strength, endurance, flexibility, and balance.

For example, practicing yoga can improve your balance, strength, and flexibility. A lot of lower-body strength-training exercises also will improve your balance. Also called aerobic exercise, endurance exercise includes activities that increase your breathing and heart rate such as walking, jogging, swimming, biking and jumping rope.

How do you use prostate drops?

Place drops under tongue 30 minutes before/after meals. Adults and children 12 years and over: Take 10 drops up to 3 times per day. Consult a physician for use in children under 12 years of age Place drops under tongue 30 minutes before/after meals.

Do Turkish men use condoms?

Condom is an effective family planning method commonly being used all around the world and also in Turkey. Condom is easily available and also easy to use.

Which country uses most condoms?

Cultural barriers to use – In much of the Western world, the introduction of the pill in the 1960s was associated with a decline in condom use. : 267–9, 272–5  In Japan, oral contraceptives were not approved for use until September 1999, and even then access was more restricted than in other industrialized nations.

  1. Perhaps because of this restricted access to hormonal contraception, Japan has the highest rate of condom usage in the world: in 2008, 80% of contraceptive users relied on condoms.
  2. Cultural attitudes toward gender roles, contraception, and sexual activity vary greatly around the world, and range from extremely conservative to extremely liberal.

But in places where condoms are misunderstood, mischaracterised, demonised, or looked upon with overall cultural disapproval, the prevalence of condom use is directly affected. In less-developed countries and among less-educated populations, misperceptions about how disease transmission and conception work negatively affect the use of condoms; additionally, in cultures with more traditional gender roles, women may feel uncomfortable demanding that their partners use condoms.

As an example, Latino immigrants in the United States often face cultural barriers to condom use. A study on female HIV prevention published in the Journal of Sex Health Research asserts that Latino women often lack the attitudes needed to negotiate safe sex due to traditional gender-role norms in the Latino community, and may be afraid to bring up the subject of condom use with their partners.

Women who participated in the study often reported that because of the general machismo subtly encouraged in Latino culture, their male partners would be angry or possibly violent at the woman’s suggestion that they use condoms. A similar phenomenon has been noted in a survey of low-income American black women; the women in this study also reported a fear of violence at the suggestion to their male partners that condoms be used.

  1. A telephone survey conducted by Rand Corporation and Oregon State University, and published in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes showed that belief in AIDS conspiracy theories among United States black men is linked to rates of condom use.
  2. As conspiracy beliefs about AIDS grow in a given sector of these black men, consistent condom use drops in that same sector.

Female use of condoms was not similarly affected. In the African continent, condom promotion in some areas has been impeded by anti-condom campaigns by some Muslim and Catholic clerics. Among the Maasai in Tanzania, condom use is hampered by an aversion to “wasting” sperm, which is given sociocultural importance beyond reproduction.

Sperm is believed to be an “elixir” to women and to have beneficial health effects. Maasai women believe that, after conceiving a child, they must have sexual intercourse repeatedly so that the additional sperm aids the child’s development. Frequent condom use is also considered by some Maasai to cause impotence.

Some women in Africa believe that condoms are “for prostitutes” and that respectable women should not use them. A few clerics even promote the lie that condoms are deliberately laced with HIV. In the United States, possession of many condoms has been used by police to accuse women of engaging in prostitution.

  • The Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS has condemned this practice and there are efforts to end it.
  • Middle-Eastern couples who have not had children, because of the strong desire and social pressure to establish fertility as soon as possible within marriage, rarely use condoms.
  • In 2017, India restricted TV advertisements for condoms to between the hours of 10 pm to 6 am.

Family planning advocates were against this, saying it was liable to “undo decades of progress on sexual and reproductive health”.

Do guys feel a difference with condoms?

If you ask most people, they would say, “Yes, it feels different with a condom “—but you’d get a range of descriptions. Some think it feels better. Some think it feels worse, and some think it just feels different. Some people say that sex feels better with condoms because they can relax and not worry about pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

And others like using condoms because they can feel different sensations while using them. A common complaint about condoms is that they make it so that you “can’t feel anything.” But some people love using condoms because they can “last longer” or they like the sensations of ribbed condoms. Some people might say they feel distanced from their partners when they use condoms.

But condoms protect you and your partner, so that can also make you feel closer. There are lots of brands and kinds of condoms out there. If you’re worried about a different sensation or a condom ruining the experience, you might think about polyurethane condoms.

  • Polyurethane conducts body heat better and can feel more “sheer.” You can also try thin latex condoms, such as Trojan UltraThin.
  • If you are uncircumcised and experience pain when you put on the condom, you may have adhesions between your glans and shaft, which can be easily remedied at a doctor’s office.

If you are someone who experiences less pleasure when your partner uses a condom for oral, vaginal or anal sex, you can add lubricant (both on the penis before you put the condom on as well as on the condom after it’s on) to help decrease friction between your skin and the condom.

You can add lubricant to a condom that is already lubricated or one that is not. You can also make sure your partner is using a condom that fits well. There are different shapes and sizes of condoms, so read each label to find out what might work best for you and your partner. Try different ones until you find one that works for both of you—kind of like an adventure! Flavored or unlubricated condoms can be used for oral sex,

And finally, even when it feels a little different when you use a condom, just remember that only condoms can protect you from most STDs, such as HIV, For heterosexual couples, they also do “double duty” by backing up your birth control, like the Pill, Patch or Shot, to protect you from an unplanned pregnancy or they may serve as your sole method of effective pregnancy prevention.

What is German BP care and cure?

German’s BP Care and Cure Drop is a well-prepared and well-tested homoeopathic remedy, which corrects the abnormalities of blood vessels and by checking vascular resistance, makes blood circulation smooth throughout the body. This also helps to maintain normal blood pressure. Key Ingredients:

Arnica Montana

Cactus Grandiflorus

Crataegus Oxyacantha

Melilotus Alba

Rauvolfia Serpentina

Valeriana Officinalis

Viscum Album

Excipients

Alcohol Content

Key Benefits:

Corrects the abnormalities of blood vessels

Checks for vascular resistance

Makes the blood circulation smooth throughout the body

Maintains normal blood pressure

Directions For Use: Use as directed. Safety Information:

Read the label carefully before use

Store in a cool and dry place away from direct sunlight

Keep out of reach of the children

What is German biological medicine?

German Biological Medicine (Drainage) – Dr Robert Brody German Biological Medicine is known as terrain medicine. This form of medicine originated in Germany and has been used for hundreds of years. Terrain medicine uses low doses of plants to help open up the elimination pathways of the body.

  1. A simple analogy is a full, smelly trash can.
  2. This trash can has been sitting in your kitchen for weeks and is starting to collect fruit flies.
  3. So I tell you to go around with a fly swatter and start eliminating the flies.
  4. This turns out not to fix the problem just mask it.
  5. Instead, a better piece of advice would be to just remove the trash can to get rid of the flies.

This concept of taking the trash out is how German Biological Medicine works. You take the trash out so your body can proceed with true healing. : German Biological Medicine (Drainage) – Dr Robert Brody