Miracle Cure For Pulmonary Fibrosis

0 Comments

Miracle Cure For Pulmonary Fibrosis
How is pulmonary fibrosis treated? There is no cure for pulmonary fibrosis.

How do the Chinese treat pulmonary fibrosis?

References –

  1. 1. Meltzer EB, Noble PW. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Orphanet J Rare Dis.2008 Mar 26;3:8. pmid:18366757
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  2. 2. Sato N, Takasaka N, Yoshida M, Tsubouchi K, Minagawa S, Araya J, et al. Metformin attenuates lung fibrosis development via NOX4 suppression. Respir Res.2016 Aug 30;17(1):107. pmid:27576730
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  3. 3. Li S, Yang X, Li W, Li J, Su X, Chen L, et al. N-acetylcysteine downregulation of lysyl oxidase activity alleviating bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Respiration.2012;84(6):509–17. pmid:23006535
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  4. 4. Demedts M, Behr J, Buhl R, Costabel U, Dekhuijzen R, Jansen HM, et al. High-dose acetylcysteine in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. N Engl J Med.2005 Nov 24;353(21):2229–42. pmid:16306520
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  5. 5. Homma S, Azuma A, Taniguchi H, Ogura T, Mochiduki Y, Sugiyama Y, et al. Efficacy of inhaled N-acetylcysteine monotherapy in patients with early stage idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Respirology.2012 Apr;17(3):467–77. pmid:22257422
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  6. 6. Tomioka H, Kuwata Y, Imanaka K, Hashimoto K, Ohnishi H, Tada K, et al. A pilot study of aerosolized N-acetylcysteine for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Respirology.2005 Sep;10(4):449–55. pmid:16135167
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  7. 7. Saito S, Alkhatib A, Kolls JK, Kondoh Y, Lasky JA. Pharmacotherapy and adjunctive treatment for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). J Thorac Dis.2019 Sep;11(Suppl 14):S1740–S1754. pmid:31632751
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  8. 8. Taniguchi H, Ebina M, Kondoh Y, Ogura T, Azuma A, Suga M, et al. Pirfenidone in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Eur Respir J.2010 Apr;35(4):821–9. pmid:19996196
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  9. 9. Noble PW, Albera C, Bradford WZ, Costabel U, Glassberg MK, Kardatzke D, et al. Pirfenidone in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (CAPACITY): two randomised trials. Lancet.2011 May 21;377(9779):1760–9. pmid:21571362
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  10. 10. King TE Jr, Bradford WZ, Castro-Bernardini S, Fagan EA, Glaspole I, Glassberg MK, et al. A phase 3 trial of pirfenidone in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. N Engl J Med.2014 May 29;370(22):2083–92. pmid:24836312
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  11. 11. Noble PW, Albera C, Bradford WZ, Costabel U, du Bois RM, Fagan EA, et al. Pirfenidone for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: analysis of pooled data from three multinational phase 3 trials.2016 Jan;47(1):243–53. pmid:26647432
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  12. 12. Rivera-Ortega P, Hayton C, Blaikley J, Leonard C, Chaudhuri N. Nintedanib in the management of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: clinical trial evidence and real-world experience. Ther Adv Respir Dis.2018 Jan-Dec;12:1753466618800618. pmid:30249169
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  13. 13. Rogliani P, Calzetta L, Cavalli F, Matera MG, Cazzola M. Pirfenidone, nintedanib and N-acetylcysteine for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Pulm Pharmacol Ther.2016 Oct;40:95–103. pmid:27481628
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  14. 14. Lee JS, Collard HR, Anstrom KJ, Martinez FJ, Noth I, Roberts RS, et al. Anti-acid treatment and disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: an analysis of data from three randomised controlled trials. Lancet Respir Med.2013 Jul;1(5):369–76. pmid:24429201
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  15. 15. Ryerson CJ, Kolb M, Richeldi L, Lee J, Wachtlin D, Stowasser S, et al. Effects of nintedanib in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis by GAP stage. ERJ Open Res.2019 Apr 29;5(2):00127–2018. pmid:31044139
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  16. 16. Zhang Y, Lu P, Qin H, Zhang Y, Sun X, Song X, et al. Traditional Chinese medicine combined with pulmonary drug delivery system and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: Rationale and therapeutic potential. Biomed Pharmacother.2021 Jan;133:111072. pmid:33378971
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  17. 17. Feng J, Sun G. Clinical observation of Yifei Tongluo recipe in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with Qi-Yi deficiency type. Hebei Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine.2018;40:1803–1806+1811. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  18. 18. Yang S, Wang W, Wang X. Clinical effect of Guben Kangxian Pill in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. Clinical Research and Practice 2019;4:110–111+132. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  19. 19. Chen H. The effect of the combination of traditional Chinese medicine of benefiting lung and dredging collaterals, promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. Inner Mongolia Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine 2016,35:54. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  20. 20. Liang C. Clinical observation on Tonifying the Lung and Dredging collaterals combined with promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis Chinese medicine in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. Guangming Journal of Chinese Medicine 2018;33:63–65. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  21. 21. Meng Y, He Q, Ren L. Clinical study of Bufei Huoxue Capsule in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Chinese Journal for Clinicians 2020;48:995–997. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  22. 22. Xue H, Zhang H, Fu J, et al. Clinical Study of Huaxian Decoction in Treating Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Combined with Qi and Yin Deficiency and Intermingled Phlegm-Blood Stasis. Geriatrics & Health Care 2020;26:44–47. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  23. 23. Li N, Zhang Z, Nie Y, et al.23 cases of treatment for idiopathic pulmonary interstitial fibrosis with Feiwei granule. Global Traditional Chinese Medicine 2018;11:1604–1607. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  24. 24. Leng M, Zhao Y, Wang Z. Comparative efficacy of non-pharmacological interventions on agitation in people with dementia: A systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis. Int J Nurs Stud.2020 Feb;102:103489. pmid:31862527
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  25. 25. Tang L, Fang Y, Yin J. The effects of exercise interventions on Parkinson’s disease: A Bayesian network meta-analysis. J Clin Neurosci.2019 Dec;70:47–54. pmid:31526677
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  26. 26. American Thoracic Society; European Respiratory Society. American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society International Multidisciplinary Consensus Classification of the Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias. This joint statement of the American Thoracic Society (ATS), and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) was adopted by the ATS board of directors, June 2001 and by the ERS Executive Committee, June 2001. Am J Respir Crit Care Med.2002 Jan 15;165(2):277–304. pmid:11790668
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  27. 27. Raghu G, Collard HR, Egan JJ, et al. An official ATS/ERS/JRS/ALAT statement: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and management. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2011;183:788–824. pmid:21471066
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  28. 28. Raghu G, Rochwerg B, Zhang Y, Garcia CA, Azuma A, Behr J, et al. An Official ATS/ERS/JRS/ALAT Clinical Practice Guideline: Treatment of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. An Update of the 2011 Clinical Practice Guideline. Am J Respir Crit Care Med.2015 Jul 15;192(2):e3–19. pmid:26177183
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  29. 29. Raghu G, Remy-Jardin M, Myers JL, Richeldi L, Ryerson CJ, Lederer DJ, et al. Diagnosis of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. An Official ATS/ERS/JRS/ALAT Clinical Practice Guideline. Am J Respir Crit Care Med.2018 Sep 1;198(5):e44–e68. pmid:30168753
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  30. 30. Chinese Society of Respiratory Diseases. Guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary (interstitial) fibrosis (Draft). Chinese Journal of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases 2002;25:387–389. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  31. 31. Interstitial lung disease group of Chinese Society of Respiratory Diseases. Chinese expert consensus on diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Chinese Journal of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases 2016;39:427–432. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  32. 32. Higgins JP, Altman DG, Gøtzsche PC, Jüni P, Moher D, Oxman AD, et al. The Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing risk of bias in randomised trials. BMJ.2011 Oct 18;343:d5928. pmid:22008217
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  33. 33. Lu X, Zheng Y, Wen F, Huang W, Shu P. Effectiveness and Safety of Oral Chinese Patent Medicines Combined with Chemotherapy for Gastric Cancer: A Bayesian Network Meta-Analysis. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med.2020 Aug 26;2020:8016531. pmid:32908569
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  34. 34. Higgins JP, Thompson SG, Deeks JJ, Altman DG. Measuring inconsistency in meta-analyses. BMJ.2003 Sep 6;327(7414):557–60. pmid:12958120
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  35. 35. Bai W, Wang B, Liao C. Effect of Maimendong Decoction on Carbon Monoxide Diffusion, Serum HA Level and Traditional Chinese Medi cine Syndrome Score for Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. Journal of Sichuan of Traditional Chinese Medicine,2019,37:92–95. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  36. 36. Fan M, Miao Q, Luo H, et al. Clinical Observation of Feixiantong Decoction on Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis with Qiyinliangxu and Feiluobizu Syndrome. Journal of Emergency in Traditional Chinese Medicine 2012;21:1377–1379. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  37. 37. Gu C. Effects of Qizhu Feixian decoction combined with pirfenidone on laboratory related indexes, symptom scores and quality of life in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis of qi deficiency and blood stasis type. Journal of Sichuan of Traditional Chinese Medicine 2018;36:75–77. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  38. 38. Guo H, Wang J. Application of pirfenidone combined with acetylcysteine in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. Heilongjiang Medicine and Pharmacy 2019;42:229–230. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  39. 39. Jiang H, Qiao D, Li H, et al. Clinical observation of feixiankang granule in the treatment of 12 cases of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with lung collateral and blood stasis type. Hunan Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine 2020;36:43–46. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  40. 40. Li Z, Dong R, Xin F, et al. Observation of Curative Effect of Yangyin Yifei Tongluo Wan on Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. Journal of Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine 2015;17:163–165. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  41. 41. Li Y, Li Q, Jia H, et al. Study on the Clinical Effect of Pirfenidone in the Treatment of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. Journal of Aerospace Medicine 2016;27:1365–1367. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  42. 42. Mao Z. Clinical observation of pirfenidone combined with acetylcysteine in treatment of idiopathic pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. Drugs & Clinic 2018;33:1969–1973. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  43. 43. Miao Q, Cong X, Fan M, et al. Clinical observation on 28 cases of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis treated with Bushen Tongluo decoction. Lishizhen Medicine and Materia Medica Research 2017;28:395–397. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  44. 44. Wang Q, Li P, Li X. Randomized Controlled Trial: Therapeutic Observation of Wen Yang Hua Yu Decoction in the Treatment of 80 Cases with Pulmonary Interstitial Fibrosis. China Continuing Medical Education 2016;8:193–196. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  45. 45. Wen J, Xie J, Zou L, et al. Study on curative effects of N-acetylcysteine combined with pirfenidone in treatment of idiopathic pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. Laboratory Medicine and Clinic 2019;16:1079–1081+1085. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  46. 46. Xi N, Qin X. Clinical Observation of Huaxian Tongluo Decoction Combined with Acetylcysteine in the Treatment of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. Journal of Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine 2018;20:201–204. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  47. 47. Xin D, Feng J. Tonifying Qi, Softening Hardness and Eliminating Abdominal Mass to Improve Life of Patients of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis with Qi Deficiency and Blood Stasis: A Clinical study. World Chinese Medicine 2016;11:2714–2716+2721. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  48. 48. Zhang H, Li X. Therapeutic Observation of Shenzhu Tiaozhong Decoctionn the Treatment of 80 Cases with Idiopathic Pulmonary Interstitial Fibrosis. Global Traditional Chinese Medicine 2018;11:1439–1442. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  49. 49. Zhao G, Hu H, Han P, et al. Clinical Study of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Treated with Fuzheng Huaxian Formula. Shandong Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine 2018;37:22–25. Chinese.
    • View Article
    • Google Scholar
  50. 50. Huang H, Dai HP, Kang J, et al. Double-Blind Randomized Trial of Pirfenidone in Chinese Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Patients. Medicine (Baltimore) 2015;94:e1600. Chinese. pmid:26496265
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  51. 51. Yu Y, Sun Z, Shi L, Zhang Y, Zhou Z, Zhang S, et al. Effects of Feiwei granules in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a randomized and placebo-controlled trial. J Tradit Chin Med.2016 Aug;36(4):427–33. pmid:28459237
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  52. 52. Zhou M, Ye C, Liang Q, Pei Q, Xu F, Wen H. Yiqi Yangyin Huoxue Method in Treating IdiopathicPulmonary Fibrosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med.2020 Oct 3;2020:8391854. pmid:33062025
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  53. 53. Wang W, Liu Z, Niu J, Yang H, Long Q, Liu H, et al. Feibi Recipe Reduced Pulmonary Fibrosis Induced by Bleomycin in Mice by Regulating BRP39/IL-17 and TGFβ1/Smad3 Signal Pathways. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med.2020 Oct 12;2020:5814658. pmid:33101446
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  54. 54. Cao MS, Sheng J, Wang TZ, Qiu XH, Wang DM, Wang Y, et al. Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: usual interstitial pneumonitis vs. possible usual interstitial pneumonitis pattern. Chin Med J (Engl).2019 Sep 20;132(18):2177–2184. pmid:31490258
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  55. 55. Lechtzin N, Hilliard ME, Horton MR. Validation of the Cough Quality-of-Life Questionnaire in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Chest.2013 Jun;143(6):1745–1749. pmid:23519393
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  56. 56. Kim HJ, Perlman D, Tomic R. Natural history of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Respir Med.2015 Jun;109(6):661–70. pmid:25727856
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  57. 57. Nathan SD, du Bois RM, Albera C, Bradford WZ, Costabel U, Kartashov A, et al. Validation of test performance characteristics and minimal clinically important difference of the 6-minute walk test in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Respir Med.2015 Jul;109(7):914–22. pmid:25956020
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  58. 58. Yu X, Zhang Y, Yang X, Zhang X, Wang X, Liu X, et al. The Influence of BuqiHuoxueTongluo Formula on Histopathology and Pulmonary Function Test in Bleomycin-Induced Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med.2018 Jun 26;2018:8903021. pmid:30046348
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  59. 59. Wang J, Fang C, Wang S, Fang F, Chu X, Liu N, et al. Danggui Buxue Tang ameliorates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats through inhibiting transforming growth factor-β1/Smad3/ plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 signaling pathway. J Tradit Chin Med.2020 Apr;40(2):236–244. pmid:32242389
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  60. 60. Li H, Wang Z, Zhang J, Wang Y, Yu C, Zhang J, et al. Feifukang ameliorates pulmonary fibrosis by inhibiting JAK-STAT signaling pathway. BMC Complement Altern Med.2018 Aug 9;18(1):234. pmid:30092799
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  61. 61. Wu Q, Zhou Y, Feng FC, Zhou XM. Effectiveness and Safety of Chinese Medicine for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Chin J Integr Med.2019 Oct;25(10):778–784. pmid:29335860
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar
  62. 62. Zhang Y, Gu L, Xia Q, Tian L, Qi J, Cao M. Radix Astragali and Radix Angelicae Sinensis in the Treatment of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Front Pharmacol.2020 Apr 30;11:415. pmid:32425767
    • View Article
    • PubMed/NCBI
    • Google Scholar

What vitamins help pulmonary fibrosis?

In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), supplementing with a combination of vitamins C, D, and E may positively affect respiratory function and alleviate inflammation and oxidative stress, according to a study published in Clinical Nutrition ESPEN.

Airway inflammation, which is related to the pathogenesis and progression of IPF, may be treated with antioxidants, study authors noted, adding that vitamins with antioxidative properties, such as vitamins C and E, can directly inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),

Vitamins C and D have also been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects, said the study authors. In the current study, researchers sought to investigate the simultaneous effect of supplementing with vitamins D, C, and E, which they said had not been previously studied in IPF patients.

  • Toward that end, the researchers evaluated 33 IPF patients who received vitamins E, C, and D with 200 IU/daily, 250 mg/every other day, and 50000 IU/weekly, respectively, for 12 weeks.
  • The investigators found spirometry and plethysmography tests demonstrated a significant increase in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV 1 ) ( P =.016), inspiratory reserve volume (IRV) ( P =.001), residual volume (RV) ( P =.002), and total lung capacity (TLC) ( P =.003); however, no significant change was seen in forced vital capacity (FVC), vital capacity (VC), forced expiratory volume percentage (FEV 1 /FVC), and expiratory reserve volume (ERV).

The researchers also found that the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ( hs CRP ), transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), and protein carbonyl (PrC) were remarkably reduced after supplementation ( P ≤.05), although the glutathione peroxidase (GPx) level remained unchanged.

Is there a way to reverse pulmonary fibrosis?

Treatment – The lung scarring that occurs in pulmonary fibrosis can’t be reversed, and no current treatment has proved effective in stopping progression of the disease. Some treatments may improve symptoms temporarily or slow the disease’s progression.

Can you live 10 years with lung fibrosis?

When you are diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis, it is normal to have many questions about what life is like living with this disease. Below are expert answers to some common questions from patients about living with PF. Be sure to learn about the basics of PF, how it is treated, how to live well and where to get support,

Why did I get pulmonary fibrosis? If you are diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), physicians do not know what caused you to get the disease. Doctors try and rule out risk factors like hazardous chemicals in the workplace, exposure to certain medication, medical procedures and family history. There are also people who have other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus that can lead to pulmonary fibrosis. Learn more, Is there a difference between pulmonary fibrosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)? “Pulmonary fibrosis” is a general term that can apply to scarring or stiffening of the lung tissue from a number of different reasons. Adding the term “idiopathic” means none of the known causes of PF have been found and that the patient’s symptoms, physical exam and high-resolution CT (HRCT) scan finding are consistent with IPF. The other distinction is treatment. IPF has two FDA-approved medications to slow the progression of the disease. These drugs aren’t approved to treat other types of PF. How is pulmonary fibrosis treated? There is no cure for pulmonary fibrosis. People with IPF may benefit from a drug that slows the progression of the disease. Oxygen therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation are key components of maintaining a good quality of life with PF. Some patients will be candidates for single or double lung transplants. Learn more, Does pulmonary fibrosis spread? Is pulmonary fibrosis contagious? PF progresses. It gets worse with time but the length of time it takes to progress varies from patient to patient. The disease is usually just in the lungs but if it is the result of other diseases, the fibrosis (scarring) can be other places like in the joints. Pulmonary fibrosis is not contagious. If someone with PF is wearing a mask, it is because they want to avoid exposures that could make them sick or trigger a coughing fit. Is pulmonary fibrosis hereditary? Should siblings and children be evaluated? PF can run in families. There are several genes associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis, but those genes aren’t present in everyone with a family history of the disease. There is currently no genetic test that can show who is a carrier of the disease or who is at risk of developing the disease if there is a known family history. Genetic testing is not recommended in most cases because it doesn’t change the recommended treatment or prognosis. If there is a family history of PF, everyone in the family should tell their doctor about it and keep an eye out for PF symptoms, What do the breathing test (pulmonary or lung function tests) numbers mean? The numbers are usually measuring lung size or capacity and flow rates. The results of a pulmonary function test are measured in comparison to the average performance of other individuals of the same age, height and weight. Test results can be measured over time to see if your lung function is getting worse. Learn more,

If I am coughing more or more short of breath does that mean my pulmonary fibrosis is getting worse? The short answer is: maybe. Worsening cough or shortness of breath are symptoms that should prompt your doctor to reevaluate you. Always talk to your doctor if your symptoms get worse. It could be a cold or bronchitis or a more serious lung infection such as pneumonia, It could also mean your disease is progressing. Make sure you stay up to date on your vaccinations, try and stay as healthy as possible and talk to your doctor right away if you notice a change in your symptoms. Does vigorous exercise slow the progression of PF ? No. Exercise can make you less short of breath by keeping your heart, lungs and breathing muscles strong. It can also help you use oxygen more efficiently. It is important to stay active and not become sedentary. Exercise doesn’t change the fact that pulmonary fibrosis will get worse over time, but it makes a huge difference in how patients feel. Learn more, What should I do to get my affairs in order? It is important for everyone (regardless of whether or not they have a health issue) to take steps to plan for serious illness or disability and end of life. This involves writing a will, completing an advance directive and durable power of attorney and making funeral or memorial arrangements. It also involves organizing any financial documents and making sure all of your important paperwork is in one place. It is also a good time to reflect on what you want out of life. A member of your palliative care team or a social worker can help you fill out important documents and help you work through any emotional issues that come up when you are life planning, What is the average survival time once diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis? A diagnosis of PF can be very scary. When you do your research, you may see average survival is between three to five years. This number is an average. There are patients who live less than three years after diagnosis, and others who live much longer. It is important to recognize that PF is a chronic condition that is going to progress and can lead to premature death. But it is also important to remember that no one can predict your individual experience. You are not a statistic. Does life expectancy change after a lung transplant? Yes. Life expectancy after a lung transplant is based on the success of the transplantation. It takes into account how your body handles the transplant and the medications you need to be on after the transplant.

I feel really depressed. Should I talk to someone? Yes. It is not unusual for patients with PF and their families to feel depressed or anxious. You may experience feelings you wouldn’t necessarily label as depression but coping with these feelings is still difficult. Talk to your doctor about what you are feeling. Your doctor can recommend a therapist or counselor who can help you work through your emotions. Learn more, Where can I find support from other patients? Support from other people facing PF is very important. You can join an online support community and attend an in-person support group. Pulmonary rehabilitation is also a great place to connect with others facing lung disease. Learn more,

If I start on oxygen therapy, will it make my pulmonary fibrosis worse? Will I become addicted to oxygen therapy? Using oxygen therapy will not make your PF worse and it is not an addictive drug. The oxygen may make you feel better and able to do more and you may prefer to be on it. What is the difference between continuous flow and pulse flow? Pulse flow delivers oxygen when you inhale. Portable oxygen concentrators deliver this type of flow. Continuous flow delivers oxygen at a steady rate, no matter how you are breathing. Home oxygen tanks provide continuous flow. The flow you need depends on how short of breath you are and what activities you are doing. Many people find pulse flow works well during the day and continuous flow works better at night.

Can I get a lung transplant if I am over 65? Maybe. Every transplant center has their own specific criteria. Some centers are moving the upper age limit to 70 or 75 years. Your eligibility for a transplant depends on many factors, not only your age. Learn more, When should I get on a lung transplant list? The sooner you are evaluated at a transplant center, the better you will understand the process. The transplant center will become familiar with you and able to identify when you need to get on a list. If you’re evaluated, it doesn ‘ t mean you need to get a transplant, but it is good to gather information shortly after you are diagnosed. Learn more,

What is the role of diet in living with pulmonary fibrosis? The main role of your diet is to help you maintain an ideal weight. Being over or underweight can impact your ability to breathe. There are no specific supplements or vitamins that have been shown to make a difference for patients with PF. Ask your doctor for a referral to a registered dietitian who can help you understand your nutritional needs. Learn more, Should I move somewhere so I can breathe better if I have pulmonary fibrosis? It is more difficult to breathe at higher altitudes. It is recommended that pulmonary fibrosis patients live at a lower altitude. Try and avoid areas where air quality is poor. Talk with your doctor about your concerns and consider the potential pros and cons of moving before making a decision. Will I need to stop working if I have pulmonary fibrosis? You should be able to continue working until your symptoms make it too difficult. If your job is very physical, you may need to stop working sooner. How important is pulmonary rehabilitation in treating pulmonary fibrosis? Pulmonary rehab will help you stay in good physical shape which will improve your quality of life. It also offers psychosocial support, which is so important to quality of life. Learn more, Can I travel with pulmonary fibrosis? Yes. Flying might require the use of oxygen during the flight, and you will need to check with the airline about arrangements. Driving should pose no issues. If you use oxygen, make sure you’ve done your homework so you know where you are getting oxygen during each leg of your trip. There are more logistics involved, but many people with pulmonary fibrosis travel well with no problems. Learn more,

Page last updated: November 17, 2022

Is there any hope for pulmonary fibrosis?

Pulmonary fibrosis is a serious, lifelong lung disease. It causes lung scarring (tissues scar and thicken over time), making it harder to breathe. Symptoms may come on quickly or take years to develop. No cure exists.

What not to do with pulmonary fibrosis?

How Can You Protect Your Lungs? – The American Lung Association says prioritizing lung health can help prevent diseases that impact our breathing. Consider these five tips:

Mask and distance to limit exposure to COVID-19. While the long-term impact of COVID-19 on our lungs isn’t yet known, studies are being published that show lung stiffening and scarring. Don’t smoke – and if you do, quit today! Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and damages lung tissue. Avoid indoor and outdoor pollutants, Have your home checked for mold and radon, and make sure you wear a mask to protect your lungs against harsh chemicals. Stay up to date with adult immunizations – including COVID-19, flu and pneumonia vaccines. Vaccines help keep us healthy and can reduce inflammation caused by avoidable illnesses. Exercise – Keep those lungs pumping with a good exercise routine and breathe deep.

Can lungs regenerate after fibrosis?

Is post-COVID lung fibrosis reversible? – “For most people, their symptoms from lung fibrosis improve back to baseline,” says Dr. Dickinson. “It’s a slightly different scenario for everyone. I haven’t encountered anyone yet who has developed progressive lung fibrosis from COVID-19 that’s irreversible.” University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers are part of the NIH to understand long COVID, including Dr.

What foods reduce pulmonary fibrosis?

Nutrition Tips for PF –

Eat a diet low in sodium (salt), added sugars, saturated and trans fat.Try and get most of your calories from lean meats and fish, fruits, whole grains, beans, vegetables and low-fat dairy products.If you are having a hard time gaining or maintaining your weight, try nutritional shakes or add healthy fats such as olive oil to your food.If you have acid reflux, avoid acidic foods such as citrus, coffee and tomatoes. Do not eat within 3 hours of your bedtime. Talk with your doctor about medication that can help.Eat smaller, more frequent meals to avoid getting too full, which can make it harder to breathe.Drink lots of water, especially when you are exercising.Some medications may have diarrhea as a side effect, Eating a bland diet, made up of bananas, rice, applesauce and toast (sometimes called the BRAT diet), can help. Always talk to your doctor about any side effects you are experiencing.Ask for a referral to a registered dietitian who can give you specific pointers for managing your diet.

Page last updated: November 17, 2022

Has anyone beat pulmonary fibrosis?

6. How is pulmonary fibrosis treated? – There is no cure for pulmonary fibrosis. Current treatments are aimed at preventing more lung scarring, relieving symptoms and helping you stay active and healthy. Your doctor may recommend medication, oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, a lung transplant and/or lifestyle changes.

Can you stop pulmonary fibrosis from progressing?

Pulmonary Fibrosis Progression and Exacerbation Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive disease that naturally gets worse over time. This worsening is related to the amount of fibrosis (scarring) in the lungs. As this occurs, a person’s breathing becomes more difficult, eventually resulting in shortness of breath, even at rest.

What is the longest someone has lived with pulmonary fibrosis?

  • Author Posts
    • February 12, 2021 at 10:58 am #27259 I’m newly diagnosed and fear the 3-5 year life span I’ve read about. Is there anyone living longer to give some encouragement?
    • February 12, 2021 at 11:01 am #27262 Hi @pammckee Welcome to the forums! I’m glad you found us, though sorry you have to be here with a new IPF diagnosis. I did want to chime in quickly to assure you that the 3-5 year prognosis is not for everyone! Actually, that data was released before the anti-fibrotic medications were approved by the FDA for use to help slow the progression of IPF, and as a result, are very outdated. I know many people who have long exceeded that 3-5 year prognosis, not only living past it but not even requiring oxygen within that timeframe. Does this help? Feel free to write any time and ask us questions. This is a wonderfully supportive platform! Charlene.
      • February 24, 2021 at 12:58 pm #27466 I recently had the same discussion with my Respirologist. I was diagnosed IPF ( they believe familial) 2017. Have been taking OFEV. My PFT is every 6 months with an xray every year. My xray shows no advancement of the scarring and my #’s on the PFT have not decreased. I am not on oxygen. But the effects of this Disease are ever present. I have one brother and one cousin also diagnosed with IPF. My brother is recently diagnosed and my cousin is at 7 years. My cousin is on OFEV and oxygen. My mother, three aunts and one other cousin (all deceased) all had IPF. They were dealing with this disease before any drugs were available. My mother and aunts all surpassed the 5 year mark ranging between 7 and 11 years. Only 1 was on oxygen. My other cousin though passed while waiting for a lung transplant at 3 years. It just goes to show that it certainly does mean that we all are individual and subject to the fate of not really knowing. I am grateful for being here, walking, talking and still breathing :-). And have the determination that whatever they say the expectancy may bethey will still be wrong, We have a truly awful disease but we are not alone in this world with our plight. I truly hope that you all surpass any estimate and you all live your life to the fullest and happiest that you can make it, given the hand you have been dealt. Cheers to you all.
        • February 24, 2021 at 7:27 pm #27478 Hello Rheal, thank you for sharing your story. Please take care, mark.
        • February 25, 2021 at 2:30 pm #27490 You are a weath of knowledge and hope. Thank you for sharing.
        • January 2, 2023 at 9:57 pm #33999 Hello everyone my name is Michael/ Mike and I’ve been on OFEV almost two years. I also have a PFT test every 6 months. I use oxygen almost all day.I try to do as much Puluminary rehab as possible. I’m open to suggestions. Thanks
        • January 11, 2023 at 5:17 pm #34094 Hello Mike, I am glad that Ofev is working for you. I have friends with Pulmonary Fibrosis, both IPF and other designations and many of them are doing well with Ofev and Esbriet. I had a short term on Ofev and then switched to Esbriet due to the complications. Esbriet worked well for several months then my liver was impacted (those blood tests are vital) and I had to leave Esbriet. So currently not on any meds. Still, all is going OK. Diagnosed in 2019, four years after it was originally on a 2015 x-ray but missed by the radiology team. So, if you assume that I was with IPF in 2015 then I am now into the game entering my eighth year. I am still classed as moderate. I use Oxygen at nite and during the day with exertion. I am able to read, watch TV etc at room air and maintain mid-nineties. I use Oxygen at 2 when sleeping and between 2 and 3 when doing chores in the house or yard or walking/exercise. I am slower than before but still manage to live alone, drive, and shop with some assistance. Love the little cart I drive at the market. The key to this being satisfying was to change my expectations and to be thankful for what I could/can do rather than fuss about what was! I find that life is just fine even if you cannot hurry up and get there. Actually, it is a bit more relaxing this way after all I am now in my 8Os so I give myself permission to do whatever I want whenever I can. Adapting to this new lifestyle was a challenge and now it is just part of life. I feel I still have some time ahead of me as long as I avoid accidents or other risks. So based on that I am living well beyond the life expectancy for a woman living in the USA! God is helping me keep this in perspective so that I can enjoy life to best of my ability. I hope you find peace in your journey; we all have one and it is better to learn to ride the current then to paddle up stream. Happy 2023 to all of you!
        • March 9, 2023 at 5:25 pm #34574 Darlene, Sounds like my life. I think we’re both thankful for still being here in our 80s and enjoying life the best we can. Sometimes my o2 goes lower than it should but I try not to stop it from doing what I want. Hang in there!
        • October 26, 2022 at 8:59 am #33388 Good Morning. I was diagnosed in March with IPF & ILD. I never heard of these diseases let alone ever think I would have a rare incurable illness especially at 59 years old. Hearing this news was very hard for me to swallow. I’ve since made progress. I was on Prednasone for 2 months i started tapering off 11 days ago, I was put on oxygen at the same time and still am on it, I will be starting Pulmonary Rehab soon hoping that will help me eliminate the oxygen. My O2 levels drop with exertion from 98 to 90 sometkes 88 with oxygen. I’m waiting to receive my prescription for Pirofedene. They say that medicine really helps slow down the scarring process. I glad I joined this group I like hearing stories about others having the same illness as me. There is hope for every one of us, I’m going through this with a positive attitude and determination.
        • May 16, 2023 at 9:22 pm #35061 Hello Cheryl Glad you’re doing well. I’m in my 5th year with PF. I was misdiagnosed for the first two yrs. Long story. I also have emphysema. But was told my main problem is the PF. Just wanted to ask you the drug too going to take I’ve not heard of is it a newer one. I was on Ofev but had too many side effects and I’m taking a break. I developed skin ulcers often and they weren’t healing. After 5 months they are healed. I’m deciding if I want to try the other drug. Would like to hear about the drug you’re going to try. I had a lot of other side effects also. I had to get off. I’m concerned if the other drugs will be the same way. If u have any info on your drug. I would love to hear. Thank you and Good Luck. Blessings to you.
      • January 5, 2023 at 2:48 pm #34039 Yes! My mom survived 10 years post diagnosis! She had a very positive attitude. I am 3 years post diagnosis and I try to keep her positive attitude. As a retired nurse I can truly say being positive is a key factor in longevity. I’ve seen patients with same diagnosis. One very positive attitude and the other had a very negative attitude. All patients with good attitudes did much better with a better survival rate. Hang in there! I am praying there is a cure soon. ❤️????????❤️????????
      • January 19, 2023 at 2:17 pm #34202 I received the same time frame over 4 years ago. Then, I changed doctors and it is a whole different story. As stated by other, the 3-5 is based upon old data. My doctor confirmed this information. My tests have all remained stable and not on oxygen. Only Ofev. My doctor told me not to worry about time. Research is ongoing. Chin up.
      • January 24, 2023 at 3:08 pm #34229 I may have said this before but I was diagnosed in 2018. It is now 2023 and still no cough or SOB. I researched myself and take zinc and a chinese herb Teavigo on Amazon, red light therapy but don’t have the IV. I refinanced my house to put in a swim spa because I have another disease that currently is worse, called ankylosis spondylitis where my bones are growing together. I am in pain 24/7 so thats why i do aerobics and swim in my back yard. I missed my last half yearly tests but after this next one I don’t see the need to go unless i start to lose weight, am sob or cough! I wouldn’t know I even have this if it weren’t for the bronchitis. How many people are walking the planet with this and don’t know it.?? Get the book called mind over Medicine. I also due meditation every night with U tube and healing at a cellular level. Nina PS. Change doctors if they tell you 3-5 years!!! I am at 4,
      • March 9, 2023 at 6:13 pm #34577 My mother actually survived 10 years from diagnosis. She passed away at 84 years of age. I was diagnosed 3 years ago. So far I’ve only had a slight worsening. I began taking haritaki that I get on Amazon. The University of Alabama did a study on mice and Haritaki reversed the scaring from PF. I started taking it one year ago. My symptoms have significantly improved. I had my first CT scan since I started taking it just today. My results should be in early next week. Best of luck to you!! 🙏🏻🙏🏻
        • March 9, 2023 at 8:59 pm #34580 Kim, can u send a link to that? I cant find it through google. Thank You!
        • March 9, 2023 at 11:11 pm #34581 One article is titled “MDM4 Protein May Help to Treat PF by Clearing Cells That Drive Fibrosis” on https://pulmonaryfibrosisnews.com/news/mechanosensitive-protein-mdm4-potential-pf-treatment-study/?cn-reloaded=1 This article refers to chubolic acid which in powder form is called haritaki. It comes from a tree in India and is called the miracle drug. I read an article a year ago that stated the PF was reversed in mice from a University of Alabama study. A friend of my cousins works at the lab in UAB and she told her to tell me to start taking it. Triphala also contains haritaki and is one I may begin taking. I am by no means suggesting anyone should take it. I just am trying to inform people so they can do research on chubolic acid/ haritaki and talk with their Dr for advise I hope this helped I will look for the other article and send it if I find it.
        • March 9, 2023 at 11:33 pm #34582 Thanks Kim. I ordered some from Amazon after reading up on it and making my own decision. It claims to be a beneficial supplement so why not. Also just started low dose zinc and NAD+. It’s important to note that many things have been cured in mice that didnt translate in people. But, who knows! Be interesting to see your CT result. I have one and PFT next month I’m kinda dreading, but really need the data.
        • March 9, 2023 at 11:46 pm #34583 I agree with you! I’ll be praying for good results from your test. I figured it won’t hurt to try what may help. I’m also taking zinc, vitamin D, and others.
        • March 14, 2023 at 3:34 pm #34622 My CT showed minimal shadowing. Last year it showed moderate shadowing!!
        • March 14, 2023 at 3:57 pm #34626 Congrats Kim! Was hoping for you to get a good result. Do they also check your PFT? In my case they are watching the DLCO. Also, how long before you think the Haritaki made any difference in how you feel? My lungs feel uncomfortable a lot and the cough comes and goes.
        • March 14, 2023 at 4:42 pm #34630 Thank you!!I felt a difference within a few months. My cough subsided quite a bit and I didn’t get very short of breath anymore. I only use my rescue inhaler once in a blue moon. Don’t know if the haritaki or prayers are being answered. I personally think the prayers lead me to the haritaki. I think it’s both! I pray you get the same results!!! 🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻 I have my next PF test in two weeks If you’d like to email me it’s
        • March 24, 2023 at 2:54 am #34714 Hi Kim, I’m interested what your doctor said about the reduction in shadowing? Thought current medications available only slowed scarring not reduced? Or is it a different thing? Pam Xx
        • March 24, 2023 at 10:29 am #34719 Pam He really didn’t have much to say. The medication does not reverse scarring. I am taking an herb from India that I believe has improved the scarring. Being a Dr based on science, I don’t believe he really advocates natural remedies. I take haritaki which the University of Alabama studied the use of it in mice and it showed it reversed the scarring. I am NOT a Dr and am NOT suggesting anyone should take it. This was a personal choice of mine to take along with the Ofev.
        • March 25, 2023 at 9:54 pm #34744 hi kim, what haritaki dose do you take? I got 750mg and take one a day.
        • March 26, 2023 at 10:07 am #34747 Kim & Others, This forum is outstanding. I have always felt that the resource of human-to-human has gone essentially untapped. I try to encourage dialogue with my patients between themselves and also to have meaningful dialogues with their physicians and all healthcare personnel. Sadly, medicine for the most part has become McMedicine. I, as an MD, and as a patient with a rare disease (not IPF but just as rare) know what almost all of you are facing. You must be your own best advocate. And getting insights from others who are motivated and are committed to healing is so important. Moreover, I learn so much from listening to patients– often a lot more than my colleagues who just do not seem to have time to be the MD (medical detective) that their degree implores them to be. I consider myself to be the Charley Chan, MD or the Jack Webb MD. Haritaki, an Ayurvedic herb from India, is said to have anti-inflammatory effects and to reduce what is called senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in aging dermal fibroblasts. So what is Haritaki? A 2023 article by Bogdanowicz (here’s a link to my Dropbox file on this paper): https://www.dropbox.com/s/7r5dp7f43q66f7j/Bogdanowicz%2023%20Reduction%20of%20Senescence%20Associated%20Secretory%20Phenotype%20and%20exosome-shuttled%20miRNAs%20by%20Haritaki%20fruit%20extract%20in%20senescent%20dermal%20fibroblasts.pdf?dl=0 says that Haritaki i.a. a standardized extract of Terminalia chebula. I had already done a search on Terminalia a few years ago looking for ways to ↓ high uric acid levels relating to CKD (chronic kidney disease). The genus Terminalia includes T. chebula but also other species such as bellerica. The latter had a greater reduction of uric acid than chebula. But T. chebula, as in Haritaki, was shown to improve the senescent phenotype created in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) that occurred 14 days after exposure to ionizing radiation. Those HDFs had shape (morphology) abnormalities (flattened and irregular cell shapes) as well as an abnormal ↑ in the enzyme beta-galactosidase + over-expression (oE) of SASP genes. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 along with CXCL1 and CSF3 were seriously ↑. Other abnormalities were also noted. Read at least the abstract in the full pdf provided. My real wish is that those of you well enough and versed in computers might form subgroups and network to get really excellent findings to spur any investigation of novel therapies such as Harataki. But the same with the current two major drugs vs. IPF: pirfenidone (Esbriet®) and nintedanib (Ofev®). I am doing that on my computer hard drive and focusing on the peer-reviewed literature. But here, on this forum, there is a wealth of human experience that needs to be abstracted into some format that is easily accessible/digestible/ and implementable. I am an voracious reader but the amount of info on Pulmonary Fibrosis News would have me reading all day long, 24/7. I wonder if a pilot approach to this could occur with a focus, for example, on Terminalia chebula (aka Haritaki). Examples: • Are there any publications on the lab findings found in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) as in the Bogdanowicz paper that are common to that of IPF? • How many patients on this forum with a diagnosis of IPF are using Haritaki? • At what dose and frequency? • Did your MD do baseline pulmonary function tests (PFTs) prior to Haritaki? • Do those of you who are up and walking perform a six-minute walk test (6MWT) as a baseline prior to, and during or after “x” many weeks of Haritaki? • What are your sources of Haritaki? Any side effects? How pure is the product you are taking? One paper I have states that Terminalia chebula Retz is the only botanical source of Haritaki. Does your supplement state that is what you are taking? I have studies herbal compounds and published on one of them called Serenoa repens (for those with lower urinary tract problems). The THL (take home lesson) was that a standardized lipidolic extract of a specific dose was needed to reliably provide improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Standardization of a natural product is often needed, especially if we are considering this as a treatment or adjunct in any illness considered significant. Lastly, here is a Dropbox link to a paper on Haritaki and its varieties: https://www.dropbox.com/s/550863xt7c1anoz/Ratha%2013%20Haritaki%20%28Chebulic%20myrobalan%29%20and%20its%20varieties.pdf?dl=0 I hope this helps. I am currently learning a lot here and using it to help one of my patients with a diagnosis of IPF (to be confirmed) who has been on pirfenidone (Esbriet®) since September but is not doing all that well. Stephen
        • March 26, 2023 at 11:11 am #34748 Hello Sir I appreciate your response concerning haritaki. I wish more Drs. would consider natural substances to use along with traditional western medicine. I presented my pulmonologist with the research article from the University of Alabama treating mice with haritaki. The results were that it reversed the scarring. Unfortunately he wasn’t very receptive. After my own research I decided to begin taking it. I take two 2250 mg each morning along with Ofev. I don’t think there have been any studies with humans and haritaki. I would love to see a study done on it. The first three of my CT scans showed moderate scarring with glass opacity. The second one showed slight worsening. My most recent one was done two weeks ago after taking haritaki for one year. The results showed minimal scarring. I do understand that each radiologist interpretation can be different. My Dr wasn’t optimistic that it had improved. My LF test have been good and I have one scheduled for tomorrow. My mother, her sister, and a cousin of mine all passed away from IPF. I can’t help but think ours was hereditary as we do have autoimmune disorders in the family. I have let people know my own personal experience and belief in haritaki noting that I am NOT a Dr and patients should do their own research and talk with their Dr. My prayer and wish is their will be a cure found as I do worry for my children and grandchildren being at risk due to the family history. Again thank you for your response Kim
        • March 27, 2023 at 10:01 am #34754 I also believe herbal remedies may help. I am keeping a keen eye on trails taking part in Australia at the moment safety testing on a new product designed to block Interlukin-11 and in mice it stopped and reversed scarring. This is my hope for my husband and PF community
      • March 9, 2023 at 6:42 pm #34579 Hi Pam, I am pleased that so many people shared their stories with you and am sure that will give you a lot of hope. For what it may be worth, I am also a IPF survivor. Was diagnosed with IPF in 2009 and given 3 years to live by one of the large teaching university hospitals in the country. I was determined to defy the odds and am happy to report that I am living a vibrant full life at 80 years in sunny Florida with a fully functioning 9 year old single lung transplant that is well cared for by the experts at Cleveland Clinic. Bottom line – unlike in 2009, you have many options to choose from today and please keep the faith. Best wishes. Les
        • March 14, 2023 at 4:38 pm #34629 Thank you!!I felt a difference within a few months. My cough subsided quite a bit and I didn’t get very short of breath anymore. I only use my rescue inhaler once in a blue moon. Don’t know if the haritaki or prayers are being answered. I personally think the prayers lead me to the haritaki. I think it’s both! I pray you get the same results!!! 🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻 I have my next PF test in two weeks
        • April 19, 2023 at 9:04 am #34901 This is a 3-wk follow-up I have 191 papers (most I have read), on the topic of Terminalia chebula, known in India as Haritaki (and other names too). Your post, Kim, led me to the paper, J.; Yang, S.-Z.; Zhu, Y.; et al. Targeting mechanosensitive MDM4 promotes lung fibrosis resolution in aged mice. Journal of Experimental Medicine and this publication is a key paper for all involved with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) or lung fibrosis due to any cause. It cites many 4+ important articles and cites the work on chebulic acid, one of the constituents of T. chebula (aka Haritaki). You should provide the cited reference above by Qu to your pulmonary doc. He is in the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
      • May 16, 2023 at 9:14 am #35037 Well well, here I am! Diagnosed in October of 2022 after coughing, SOB, for a number of years and being told I had asthma even after chest x-rays presented these sick lungs of mine. I was denied a lung transplant just last Wednesday after months of testing. I’m on 02 since October 24/7, and in Pulmonary Rehab. Muscle uses less oxygen I’ve been told. Also on OFEV and nothing else. I too was told I have 5 years to live. My friends have said one of my lung doctors is “empathy challenged”. But there it is. I was so focused on getting to the end of the lung transplant testing and being listed, I was preparing for this since October. I’m here to read about others like us, and how to carry on and live the life we have been dealt with. I am 68 years old and not sure how long I’ve had pulmonary fibrosis. Thank you for sharing and I learn more each day.
    • February 16, 2021 at 4:23 pm #27314 I am very glad Pam asked the question and got Char’s response! I have also heard that 3-5 year prediction and worried about it. Of course, when you consider almost any disease and think about the ongoing progress in treatments, that is likely the case almost every time. It is very reassuring to hear you “say” this right out loud here. 🙂 And, welcome, Pam. I was diagnosed in November 2017 and have been taking Esbriet since August 2019. Still here and kicking, although maybe not at the same rate as before, but happy to have this forum to turn to for information and support. Karen
    • February 16, 2021 at 5:57 pm #27317 My pulmonologist currently has two ipf patients who were diagnosed 10 years ago. The longest patient case he has ever had is 17 years. I have interpreted his guidance to believe that the disease acts differently in different people. It is also dependent upon how well you take care of yourself and any other ailments you might have. I myself was just diagnosed last August 2020.
    • February 16, 2021 at 7:45 pm #27325
      1. What reassurance Char and Greg & Karen ! Thank you ?
      2. It is a great uplifting thought to hold
      3. I work hard to keep a positive attitude
      4. because as a retired RN I have seen the power of positive thinking and taking the best possible care of ourselves
      5. stay safe everyone and take care
      6. Mary W

      February 16, 2021 at 7:59 pm #27328 Hi @mary-ward I’m so glad to hear some of this dialogue and the responses have been helpful! Of course no one can say for sure or speak to our life span with any sort of certainty, but I agree: positive thinking and optimism can go along way in navigating life with a chronic illness for sure,Taking care of ourselves both physically and mentally is equally important 🙂 Thanks for writing, Char.

    • February 16, 2021 at 9:41 pm #27334 There are over 400 types of interstitial lung disease so that is why some will have a shorter life span than others. I believe that I have put mine into remission or stabilized it for over 4 years now. My IPF is nonspecific pneumonitis. Denny

      February 17, 2021 at 8:22 am #27342 Hello Denny, you make a great point. It’s also pleasing to hear when a member has remained stable for such a long period of time. Breathe well today my friend! Mark

    • February 16, 2021 at 10:07 pm #27336 I was diagnosed in August 2019 and have been taking Esbriet since Dec 2019. “Still here and kicking, ” like Karen have less energy than before, but happy to have this forum to turn to for information and support, as well. Do lots of outdoor sports to keep the body working, helps

      February 17, 2021 at 8:06 am #27341 Hello Paul, you keep kicking and stay as active as you possibly can. Have a great breathing day! Mark

    • February 17, 2021 at 12:47 pm #27348 Hello, Pam and others – I have been blessed. When I was diagnosed in the spring of 1996 (25 years ago), I could not take more than a few steps without being breathless. I could not shower as the warm, moist air made it impossible to breathe. I coughed so much my throat was raw. I was prescribed a steroid. The pulmonologist gave me 6 months to a year to live; said my lungs were “filling up fibrosis.” I was very discouraged with my outlook, only compounded by suddenly facing family issues and upheaval in my job. The stress was incredible. I was encouraged to exercise, which was difficult. I pushed myself to bike and walk. I took breathing tests and image studies frequently, and persevered. This went on until 2012 when my pulmonologist retired and passed my case management to my primary care provider, who took image studies annually. Because I am a recent prostate cancer survivor, my PCP suggested I get a consult from a pulmonologist to establish a new baseline on my ILD. Consequently, I was prescribed OFEV, although I do not present common symptoms of the disease. He said the medicine can slow the disease, but he did not/ could not provide an estimated time of my demise. This caused me to do more fresh reading about ILD, and I found this Wonderful forum. Clearly, some of these diseases move incredibly fast, while others are slowpokes (that’s good). If a person who is newly diagnosed is able to exercise, I think this helps lung functionality, but I’m no medical professional so listen to you doc. Nothing can stop the disease. I’m 68 and am walking 3 miles a day. As for stress and anxiety, i have worked hard to manage theses things that weigh down my attitude. That said, Iam still dealing with the sticker shock spurred by the price of the prescription. I don’t know what God intends for me. I am grateful for every day.
      • February 17, 2021 at 1:52 pm #27349 Hello Mark B., what s great story. May you continue to persevere. So happy to you are doing well. Thank you for sharing. Mark
        • May 11, 2022 at 8:59 pm #32027 My mom was just diagnosed with pf and I found this forum in hopes that I could learn something that seems to help her heal or get better. My mom was working right up till she just couldn’t go anymore and went to the hospital. She was there two weeks and they sent her home with her oxygen and medicine which I’m not sure what they have her on. I am gonna find out, I don’t live near her sadly and so my sister is helping take care of her. She had an appointment today and just the walk to the car and the drive there was to much for her. They almost sent her back to the hospital cause she was collapsed in the hallway. Any advice will be much appreciated. She seems to be doing much better since she got home and rest and her oxygen was at the strength needed. I worry the Florida heat may not be good for her. Thank for any advice in advance. Best wishes to everyone struggling with this, my prayers and heart goes out but I am so glad to read that there is positive stories out there.????
        • May 13, 2022 at 2:50 am #32047 Hi Jamie, fellow daughter of PF mom here. Sounds like your mom’s case is pretty similar to how my moms was. She was eligible for a lung transplant and is doing well three years on from that. Doctors might bring that up for discussion with her, and I’d be happy to chat with you about making that choice, caregiving, or whatever you need as you go through this with your family. It’s a good thing your sister is able to be there and help take care of her. The more hands-on, the better until she recovers some. Sounds like doctors are on to a good start with oxygen and medications but if she is feeling ill enough that she’s already been hospitalized, best to keep a close eye on her oxygen saturations and other symptoms. Acute exacerbations of this disease can come on quickly and end poorly. Not trying to scare you, just want you to err on the side of caution rather than a “wait and see” approach. If she isn’t yet under the care of a pulmonologist, specifically, get her in to see one. General physicians are usually not too knowledgeable about this disease as it is rare.
    • February 18, 2021 at 2:14 pm #27356 Reading these posts are so helpful and uplifting. I’m 71 and in pretty good health so it helps to know there are others living longer than expected. Years ago my husband was given six months to live with cancer, but he lived six years. My dad was told he had five years to live with heart failure and he lived 20 years. Hope is a wonderful thing.
    • February 18, 2021 at 2:20 pm #27357 Sorry about your diagnosis Pam. I too have asked the question, but can not get anyone to provide realistic statistics, which must exist somewhere. “Everyone is different”is true, but there must be some information that will help those with IPF evaluate how to plan their future. Rather than discourage me, it would help me feel informed and therefore empowered. Clinical trial reports from many countries currently use 3-5 yrs in their reports. If 5-9 yrs with the two fibrotic drugs is a better figure, why is it not published? Stay strong, optimistic, and positive!
    • February 18, 2021 at 3:27 pm #27359 I have IPF. I was diagnosed in 2012 and began taking Ofev in 2018. I went on oxygen for sleeping in 2018 and use it if active and exercising. I too received the 3-5 year and it was scary. What you have to understand is that everyone is different and there is no way to predict. I know totally ignore the 3-5 year guestimate and feel great and plan to keep on for many more years.
    • February 18, 2021 at 3:46 pm #27361 Welcome Pam to the forum. My husband was diagnosed 4 years ago and we read with dismay the 3-5 life span. He has been taking Esbriet since being diagnosed, sees his pulmonologist every 6 months and is in great shape – no oxygen. I too wish that the outdated information would be remove especially since there is now medication that works to slow the progression of the disease. Ignore that info – we are!!!
    • February 18, 2021 at 5:10 pm #27363 Hello everyone. Just reading all the predictions everyone has been given. I too was told 2-5, which put me into a shock. All I could do was set there with my mouth open. It will be 1 year this next month. I am trying to stay active but the cold is keeping me pretty much inside. I would love to go for a walk, but the cold, even on a short 1 block walk to the mailbox, freezes my oxygen line. With my fake knee, the cold freezes it up and I cannot move. So, the boring inside of the house reminds me of the hospital room. I do the exercises I did in the hospital to keep some movement. My wife asked me the other day if we are going to do the landscaping we had planned on doing last spring before I got hospitalized and I told her I sure hope so. Working in the yard has always been my fun thing to do. So, we’ll see if it comes to pass. Everyone, have a great weekend and yak at you later.
    • February 18, 2021 at 6:12 pm #27364 I made it 6 years and was supposed to die in two. Even though they tried to kill me without trying to with their negligence. Take the diagnosis and prognosis with a grain of salt as cited by the gentleman above. Everything is not IPF at all. These doctors.
    • February 18, 2021 at 10:01 pm #27367 I’m an 83 year old female who was diagnosed with IPF in 2008 and was given 2-5 years. Surprise!!! Here I am still kicking. I have slowed down this past year and have had some progression and have to decide whether I want to go on Ofev. I’ll probably try it but if the side effects make me too sick I’ll just take my chances. I still feel fine just can’t do the things I could do a year ago. I have a cough and I’m on oxygen 24/7. Once Covid is over I plan to get out and get active again. Oxygen makes it possible to stay active for me. Stay positive!!!!
    • February 19, 2021 at 12:08 pm #27382 Thanks for asking the question Pam, and for all uplifting comments. The 3-5 year is the first information you get after being diagnosed, both online and also all information from the hospital. It`s so scary so getting balanced information is very helpful. I try to keep a positive attitude, eat properly and work out as much as I can. This group helps a lot, so greatfull to be part of it. I understand that a protein rich diet is the best. Any experiences in terms of diets? Stay healthy and have a great w/e. Best regards, Ida
    • February 21, 2021 at 11:16 am #27411 I am a 67 year old male and was diagnosed 4 months ago. I have resisted my doctor’s advice to start taking Ofev or Esbriet in recent weeks. He thinks I should choose one of the 2 to avoid an acute progression since it’s in early stages now. I plan to see another doctor at Baylor College of Medicine before I do that. I am worried about the side effects of both of these drugs. I made big dietary changes in recent months and focus on anti inflammatory products such as ginger, turmeric, cinnamon, green tea and EGCG capsules. I avoid coffee, milk, tomatoes and red meat. I also work out at least 5 times a week. My oxygen level is normal (high 90s). This group has been a godsend for me. You have given me inspiration, hope and support I needed to be better informed. Thank you all.
      • February 21, 2021 at 11:37 am #27413 Hi Manzurul, you have a great outlook. You are doing everything right including getting a second opinion. Have a great Sunday, Mark
      • February 23, 2021 at 6:45 pm #27456 @mhkhan93 Manzurul, I too will be 67 in a few months, I was diagnosed last year, started Esbriet September or so. My last two visits to my pulmonologist have shown steady gains in my pulmonary function tests. Is it the Esbriet? Is it the fact that I have kicked my exercise routing up a couple of notches? Is it the Galapagos GLPG 1690 clinical trial I was involved in? No one can say. I am not pleased to be on any of these drugs. During discussions with my Galapagos Clinical Trial nurse, I shared this thought with her, and because I was showing improvement, I indicated that I was considering getting off these meds. Her response was interesting: her opinion was that IPF should be treated in a similar fashion to cancer, in that we should throw everything we have at it in the interest of prolonging quality of life. I thought that was interesting, and gave it great consideration, and have decided to continue with the path I am on, without the Galapogos trial as it has been discontinued. I have read and heard in many places that one can’t predict the rate of decline for IPF patients, but that often once the decline begins, it is steep. This was part of her reasoning. I will continue with Esbriet. The side effects are tolerable, the expense isnt’, although I have the good fortune to be able to absorb that expense. Everyone reacts differently to IPF, so I have been told. I am going to continue to fight it with every tool I have. Good Luck!
    • February 23, 2021 at 11:47 am #27449 Great positivity here! thank you I need a target. i am 73 years old ( shh, don’t tell anyone ) diagnosed with IPF September, 2020 and went on Esbriet. Do have side effects from the Esbriet, but want to know how others are doing walking ( now on a treadmill in doors because of the cold ) I walk for 30 minutes at 2.8mph on a slight incline ( no.4 ) and occasionally get down to 90 O2, when I ease up for a bit and then continue. What are others doing? What should be my target? thank all again

      February 24, 2021 at 7:35 pm #27480 Hello Carlo, in order to get the information you desire I suggest you participate in phase 2 pulmonary rehabilitation. They will be able to gauge your performance and they will provide you with the METS required and desired. Here is a link explaining this process. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/met-hour-equivalents-of-various-physical-activities

    • February 23, 2021 at 6:54 pm #27457 Pam, Esbriet received its FDA approval January 11, 2017, OFEV in 2014. Both pretty recent. My pulmonologist told me the 3-5 year expectancy is a bit of an artifact from the days before either of these drugs were available. As you can tell from this forum, there are very many people that have far exceeded that expectancy. Keep educating, keep positive, and don’t let it get you down. I think we all plan on hanging around longer than 3-5!
    • February 23, 2021 at 8:24 pm #27459 Great topic! I was diagnosed with IPF in July of 2020. I have been on Ofev for 2 1/2 months with very little side affects. I think the reason I have minimal side affects is that I take my pills as close to 12 hours apart as possible. When I was first diagnosed with IPF, I was pretty down after reading about the life span on the internet. But after reading comments from others on this forum, my outlook turned positive. I’m going to live as long as the good Lord wants me too. And I am going to live as good of a life as possible. I don’t take breathing for common anymore. I thank God everyday.

      February 24, 2021 at 7:43 pm #27481 Hello John, you have a wonderful positive outlook. Taking your medicine on time helps with the efficacy of the medication. You are right about the gastric effects. Some people do everything right, eat healthy and eat the small meals and have disheartening gastric effects. Others can eat pizza and wings and the medicine doesn’t have a negative effect on your digestive system. Take care, Mark

    • February 23, 2021 at 8:35 pm #27460 P.S. After thinking about what I just said about taking my Ofev as close to 12 hours apart as possible, my just be in my head. I may just be one of the fortunate ones that have very little side affects from the Ofev. It’s all a little confusing.
    • February 23, 2021 at 9:47 pm #27462 I assume that these life expectancy estimates are based upon real statistics. My father died from IPF in may 2003–and my recollection was that the 3-5 year window was what was contained in the literature back then. But so much of this is based upon when the diagnosis occured. My dad was misdiagnosed at the va –and on december 20 2002 was told by a private practitioner that he had end stage ipf. My point is that cases like his greatly reduce the prognosis–and back then there was no treatment. He was put on a drug to suppress his immune system (from the mayo) which hastened his demise. From reading this forum things have greatly improved.

      February 24, 2021 at 7:50 pm #27482 Hi Steven, much of the literature still contains the estimated 3-5 years expected life span. I don’t know why they wouldn’t move to using a medium rather than an average for measurement. I do think many hospitals and institutions are trepid in their estimations until a large respected institution changes their numbers. I think a valid and reliable research study would facilitate this change as well. Thank you Steven for your input, Mark.

    • February 25, 2021 at 11:28 am #27489 To Pete and all those who contribute, I have gained so much from your shared experiences. I feel I belong to a community who are caring, selfless and pulling for one another. I am in early stages and the journey ahead will be long, I hope. And from what I have learned here, I will benefit in easing my burden. I want to quote the words of our national poet, Maya Angelou, “I can be changed by what happens to me but I refuse to be reduced by it.”. Thanks, everyone.
    • February 25, 2021 at 2:54 pm #27491 My local pulmonologist stated my life span would be 2-5 years. However after getting a second opinion at a Center of Excellence (Univ. of Pa.) and after they doctor there reviewed my lung biopsy I was told I had over 10 years plus. So far it has been 5 years and still on Esbriet and stable. One thing to keep in mind sitting or lying around does not help. Find lung exercises to do and walk. Depending on weather I walk 25k-40k steps per week. YOU can do anything.
    • February 25, 2021 at 8:23 pm #27500 I was diagnosed in June 0f 2018 and told 3-5 years. I probably had this in 2014 or maybe earlier. Didn’t know until I went under for another procedure. I was initially on oxygen when sleeping, but upgraded to 24/7 in 2019. I am currently on 5 lpn pulse when out and 4 lpm when exercising. I was put on the transplant list in January 2021 as my doctors wanted me to have the surgery when I was more healthy. I will be 72 in June and have a positive outlook on things. The 3-5 year prognosis is debatable, depending on when they actually catch this. Stay positive and hope for the best. Listen to your doctors. Mike Moses
    • February 26, 2021 at 2:28 pm #27504 I am 74 and was diagnosed Oct.2017. Like just about everyone, I was told the median life expectancy was 3-5 years. Since I had no symptoms and my diagnosis was initially based on a CT scan of my abdomen due to kidney stones, I was told that my condition was caught early. To this day I have not received any prediction on how long I might have. Aug.2019 my sister (she was 77) recieved her IPF diagnosis. Six months later she passed. I later found out she had an earlier Enphysema diagnosis due to smoking. Being my sister was an extremely private person, she lived in another state, and we only talked every few months or so, she shared very little about how serious her condition was. I knew she was sick, but I had no idea how sick and that she would pass within 6 months of her IPF diagnosis. I suspect her Enphysema had as much, or even more, to do with her passing than her IPF. I have no doubt my sister’s doctors told her how grave her condition was and possibly told her how long she might have. I can only imagine that it was much less than the typical 3-5 years.
    • February 26, 2021 at 4:07 pm #27506 I’ll share my story. I was diagnosed with IPF in 2011. For some time now I’m been waking up thanking God for my “shiny new marble” and asking God to help me be a blessing to others this day. Several years ago I read of an individual who studied the life expectancy actuarial tables to determine the number of days, on the average, that he had to live. With this info he purchased that many marbles and placed them in a large glass jar in his downstairs workroom. First thing every morning he’d go down to his workroom and remove one marble from the glass jar and thank God for the new day asking Him to make him a blessing to others throughout the day. In my case, as I said, I was diagnosed with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) in 2011. At the time webMD projected the longevity for IPF patients to be three to five years after diagnosis — just as many of you have read. It did not take me long to quickly figure out that my glass jar had been empty for quite some time. BUT every morning I can thank God for my “shiny new marble” — another day given to me as a gift from God. Daily my prayer is to be a blessing to those around me. God certainly is Good! These marbles help me to keep life in perspective! So yes, one can live quite a while with IPF. I’ve been on oxygen now for about a year and doing quite well!
      • February 28, 2021 at 7:46 pm #27526 You have a great attitude @dongraybill ! I have no doubt that will serve you well throughout the course of your journey with IPF. Thank you for taking the time to write and share your story — I appreciate your attitude and positivity. Char.
      • March 3, 2021 at 4:34 am #27556 Thank you Don for a wonderful, uplifting post. I especially liked the quote “be a blessing for other”. I will try to do the same, and will keep Your Words in my heart. God bless you. Best regards, Ida
    • March 4, 2021 at 3:02 pm #27577 Randy, I am not sure what you were diagnosed with or if you are taking either Esbriet or Ofev. My husband was diagnosed in October 2014 and he started out on the generic version, Pirfenex and then on to Esbriet; 6 years together. He is doing remarkably well and is Pulmonologist is very pleased as to how he is doing. He also got the 3-5 years statistics which obviously he has surpassed. I know that someone was frustrated that no one gave a study as to why 3-5 years is not correct anymore. I am not sure what or if there is a study. My husband asked his Pulmonologist if Esbriet is even working and not just all the other things that come in to play. The Pulmonologist just asked my husband why he would get off a winning horse?! I just know he is doing well and really no side effects other than some days he feels “fuzzy” which does not last longer than a hour or earlier on he got a bad sunburn. He now wears sunscreen. I hope this helps to remain optimistic as we are.
    • March 4, 2021 at 3:03 pm #27578 Thanks so much Char and Ida for your kind words. In this IPF journey it is real easy to fall into the mode of simply trying to “survive” life. Instead I want to “thrive” in it. My shiny new marble each day helps me do that! Don
    • March 11, 2021 at 2:28 pm #27678 When I was diagnosed with IPF (over 5 years ago) I, too, was totally set back by the 3-5 year median life span after diagnosis. Over the last 5 years I have determined the following facts: 1. The statistical analysis apparently was conducted on data from 1992 to 2003 2. Diagnosis of IPF was apparently made much later in the progress of the disease because of the lack of information about the disease and the inability to use equipment and methods that we now have to diagnose much sooner in the progression of the disease.3. There was no treatment specifically for IPF. Treatments that were used were usually based on other forms of fibrosis which have since been proven to be ineffective for IPF. We now have two drugs approved for IPF that have been proven to slow the progression of the disease.4. There have been no further studies on the mortality so we keep getting quoted the 3-5 year life span because there is no other study using more up to date information. I challenge the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation to commission a study that will provide much more current and reliable information. Updating this outdated information is really critical for those who are recently diagnosed. You just have to look at the posts on this site and other forums to see the anguish that quoting this completely outdated information creates.

      March 13, 2021 at 11:09 am #27707 @willyk Hi William, Thank you so much for sharing these important points about the 3-5 year prognosis! We often talk about how they’re outdated on this forum and it’s important not to go by just those numbers but we don’t often elaborate on why, so your post is very helpful. Thank you for taking the time to write it! 🙂 I’d also like to see the PFF amend their information on this. Hopefully soon! Char.

    • March 11, 2021 at 4:29 pm #27684 William, that is a great post!! Thank you for the up-to-date information. You are absolutely right that another study needs to be done, or at least doctors need to see this! I am sure you made many people feel LOADS better with this information. Have a great day, everyone. 🙂
    • March 16, 2021 at 10:28 am #27730 Anonymous Hi, The 3-5 years is nothing but an old guideline that some doctors dont bother to correct so no one holds them accountable for anything that comes out of their mouths. The reality is that the 3 – 5 years was inaccurate even in the old days prior to new medication, because not all patients were diagnosed as soon as their disease started, many were late diagnoses which meant that IPF patients on average lived longer than those 3 – 5 years. So now that there are earlier diagnoses and better medication the life span is for sure longer than that. In any case, i believe the most important thing is to stop listening to these generalisations and live your life as best and as active as you can. Be proactive with your doctors, do some research and learn more about things you can do and take it one day at a time.
    • March 16, 2021 at 10:48 am #27731
    • March 16, 2021 at 2:16 pm #27733 Three to five year prognosis seems pretty accurate in my case.
    • March 17, 2021 at 9:02 pm #27750 Jim–I am so sorry to hear about your prognosis. But for many the timing of prognosis is everything. Let me re-tell you my story. My father died of ipf in 2003. His sister died of ipf approx 2018. MY dad was 72 when he passed–my aunt was over 80.My dad was misdiagnosed by the veterans administration–when he received a correct diagnosis he was end stage—less than 6 months to live. So what have I done? I went to my primary shortly after my dad’s death (2003) and had a c-scan ran. It was negative. In 2019 I went back for another c-scan also negative. I also “blew” into the breath machine—which by the way they do not explain clearly. when you think you are no longer exhaling–you actually are because the instrument is so accurate. Diagnosis and early diagnosis is everything. My dad’s physician told him this nasty stuff was growing in him for a decade. How would he know that? I do not know–but he is an expert and was strident in his statement. Everyone should keep the faith.
    • March 18, 2021 at 11:58 pm #27792 Hi everyone, I believe the 3-5 years estimate given by a pulmonologist is a disservice to most patients. When I was diagnosed on October, 2020 and told I had 3-5 left to live, it triggered a series of reactions inside me which were mostly harmful. Fortunately for me, I had a supportive family who refused to accept this and pointed to my overall health. Since then, I have done everyone in my power to feel better. I had my 2nd set of breathing tests and 6-minute walk test last week. My lung functions have become stable and moving in the direction. My 6-minute walk test results also improved from 600 meters to 660. I walk 60k-70k steps each week rain or shine, freezing or in humid Houston heat. I am staying away from medicine for now. All the posts here have been a source of inspiration and encouragement for me. My thoughts and prayers go out to all those who are facing acute conditions. I believe most of us will easily beat the 3-5 years prediction and far outlive 5, 10 or 15 years. I know I plan to and unwilling to surrender to this terrible disease.
    • March 19, 2021 at 10:18 am #27798 Manzurul, that’s terrific! How do you get the inspiration to walk every single day? I am a 73 year old and was diagnosed in September 2020. I am struggling at 3 times a week. I walk at 115 steps per minute for 40 minutes at 2.8mph. So that would be 13,800 on my treadmill. Your total steps at my rate would be almost an hour and a half per day. Geez, if I could get to half rate??

      March 20, 2021 at 3:41 am #27810 Hey @Carlo that’s not bad at all! 2.8 mph is a really healthy pace. 🙂 And I think if you tracked your steps throughout the whole day (fitbit, or pedometer) you would be surprised at how many you take outside of dedicated exercise time. That said, I also think it’s great that you’re committed to 40 minutes 3 times per week. Keep up the good work!

    • March 20, 2021 at 11:12 am #27818 Thank you Christie! I have a CT scan and a breathing test in April, so we will see what we need or could do to get that up a bit. I need a challenge to stay motivated.
    • March 23, 2021 at 5:02 pm #27844 I was diagnosed in December 2020with a 50% life expectancy for 5 years. Very upsetting and depressing. However after seeking more info, it seems from and old CT that this disease started in 2010. That means eleven years ago. Also more tests showing it has progressed but not that bad as yet. Will be taking meds to slow it down. I plan on will sticking around long enough for a cure.
    • March 24, 2021 at 9:54 am #27856 Augusta, Glad to hear your optimism! I have a similar history. I was diagnosed in September 2020 at which time it was noted that I was probably with IPF in 2015. There has been some progression in the disease in the 5 years but at a slow pacegood news to me. I have a CT scan and breathing tests coming up in April so we will see what effect Esbriet has had on the disease progression. Live one day at a time as much as the good Lord gives you.
    • March 31, 2021 at 6:46 am #27928 I lost my husband, my soulmate last week to a combination of heart failure and PF. I am posting to actually let those with this horrible disease know that the lifespan is variable and not written in stone. My husband was diagnosed over 20 years ago when a heart attack revealed the crackling in his lungs. We had an amazing life and shared many adventures together. I can’t say the end wasn’t hard, but we did finally let hospice (frightened as we were of that very word) come in to help. So keep fighting and God Bless y’all.
      • April 1, 2021 at 2:05 am #27939 @edot Edward, I am so sorry to hear about the passing of your husband. It makes me happy to hear that he lived a long and adventurous life after his diagnosis. This disease is so unpredictable, it’s nice to hear stories of people who prove the prognosis wrong. I hope that hospice, as scary as it can seem, was a help to you both in making this transition. Sending you love and comfort during this time, Christie
      • April 2, 2021 at 10:28 am #27962 @edot I’m so very sorry for your loss. Please know that I am thinking of you during this difficult time. Amid your grief, I am so grateful you’ve taken the time to write us and help others based on your husband’s experience. I agree with you that lifespan is a variable, and it is always helpful to hear of others who endured IPF much longer than the prognosis. Thank you again and take good care of yourself. Charlene.
    • April 1, 2021 at 2:30 pm #27949 I had heard that endomethacin was bad for us with IPF, but I really need it for arthritis pain and inflammation. Thanks, Robert
    • May 12, 2022 at 3:45 pm #32043 Pam, Sorry to hear about your IPF diagnosis. I was diagnosed in November, 2015 & was totally shocked to read the 2-5 year prognosis! I cried every day for the first 6 months. My pulmonologist is very pro-active & ordered bloodwork to rule out about 40 autoimmune disorders since I had no precipitating factors. She also referred me for a barium swallow, which showed that I had terrible GERD, in spite of no symptoms. My GI followed up with an endoscopy which confirmed a “silent” GERD diagnosis, & I started on Prilosec twice daily. After a lung biopsy indicated I had the UIP type of IPF, I went to National Jewish Health in Denver for a 2nd opinion in June, 2016. The docs there felt that my IPF was not “typical” & felt that my fibrosis might have been caused by the untreated GERD causing acid to spill into my lungs. Upon their recommendation, I made the decision not to start medication but to have PFT’s & 6 min. walks every 4 months to closely monitor any deterioration. I am happy to report that 6+ years later, there has been no progression of my disease based on HRCT scans, PFT’s & 6 min. walks. I am not on medication (other than the Prilosec) & now have PFT’s & 6 min. walks every 6 mo. & an HRCT every 1-2 years. I also exercise regularly.2-5 years is an average & does not apply to everyone. A lot depends on how early you were diagnosed, how severe your fibrosis is, & how well you take care of yourself with diet & exercise. Best wishes & welcome to the forum!
    • May 12, 2022 at 3:45 pm #32044 Pam, Sorry to hear about your IPF diagnosis. I was diagnosed in November, 2015 & was totally shocked to read the 2-5 year prognosis! I cried every day for the first 6 months. My pulmonologist is very pro-active & ordered bloodwork to rule out about 40 autoimmune disorders since I had no precipitating factors. She also referred me for a barium swallow, which showed that I had terrible GERD, in spite of no symptoms. My GI followed up with an endoscopy which confirmed a “silent” GERD diagnosis, & I started on Prilosec twice daily. After a lung biopsy indicated I had the UIP type of IPF, I went to National Jewish Health in Denver for a 2nd opinion in June, 2016. The docs there felt that my IPF was not “typical” & felt that my fibrosis might have been caused by the untreated GERD causing acid to spill into my lungs. Upon their recommendation, I made the decision not to start medication but to have PFT’s & 6 min. walks every 4 months to closely monitor any deterioration. I am happy to report that 6+ years later, there has been no progression of my disease based on HRCT scans, PFT’s & 6 min. walks. I am not on medication (other than the Prilosec) & now have PFT’s & 6 min. walks every 6 mo. & an HRCT every 1-2 years. I also exercise regularly.2-5 years is an average & does not apply to everyone. A lot depends on how early you were diagnosed, how severe your fibrosis is, & how well you take care of yourself with diet & exercise. Best wishes & welcome to the forum!
    • May 13, 2022 at 7:45 am #32050 I’m so happy to read that your doing good and thank you so much for the information. I’m trying to understand and learn about this and it’s very hard to take in. I just want to help her and make her better but reading other people’s experiences with dealing with this makes me feel better to know she can make it and keep her mind focused on getting better.
    • May 17, 2022 at 9:32 am #32075 Hi Pam, I was diagnosed April 2021, so pretty recent. I was told the same thing, three to five years. That was quite shocking. The more I investigated that statement the more I realised that this is an average. The data has been collated over many years, including data from before any drugs were available to us. Certainly OFEV was not available to anyone in the UK unless you were really bad with your FVC something like 40% (I stand to be corrected here). Since 14th February this year, with recommendation from the Consultant, it is available to anyone who has lost 5% lung function on the initial test or the last test. This has happened to me and I am now taking OFEV (Nintedanib). I was worried about the side effects, but so far afetr a week I have had none at all so I am indeed lucky. This 3-5 year statement all depends on your personal circumstances. Age, environment, if you were/are a smoker, exposed to dust, chemicals or other nasties like asbestos all your life. I expect your consultant has discussed this with you. As you see from the replies on here, this average has gone way out. I am also chasing pharmaceuticals all over the world to find out where they are with drugs that can stop and reverse our condition. They may not exist right now, but they are coming! Above all stay positive, be happy, there are drugs that can help and with this great Forum there is great advice and support. Regards Jeff
    • May 17, 2022 at 2:10 pm #32078 I was diagnosed 16 years ago and I have been on oxygen 24 seven for a number of years now. I have been on Esbriet since it has been approved and take it religiously. I highly recommend pulmonary rehab which I have done several times and plan on doing again. Mindfulness has also helped. At 76 I feel the idea of a lung transplant is not for me. Good luck and you do have reasons to be optimistic.
    • May 17, 2022 at 3:43 pm #32081 I’m convinced that the 3-5 years can be misleading. For many people, there have been years and years of bouts of shortness of breath, dyspnea, coughing, etc., and the person is diagnosed with pneumonia, the flu, bronchitis, or some other respiratory illness. Many suffer for a decade or more with those symptoms until they actually see a pulmonologist who orders the required testing which confirms IPF. My sister passed within days of her diagnosis of IPF. She walked into the hospital with yet another bout of ‘bronchitis,’ one of many, many rounds of that misdiagnosis over the years. She was hospitalized, grew steadily worse, and died within a few days of her hospitalization. My diagnosis was 10 years ago, initially diagnosed by an ER doctor who looked carefully at my x-Rays after a bout of difficulty breathing. He referred me to a pulmonologist. I had X-rays, CT, and VATs over the next year which confirmed the diagnosis. Because my diagnosis was made when I barely showed honeycombing in my lower lobes, and had few symptoms, I have had little concern about the 3-5 year life expectancy because my disease advanced slowly. However, within the past six months, there has been a noticeable change, intensified symptoms, so maybe I am now at the 3-5 year threshold. Only God knows!

      May 24, 2022 at 9:23 pm #32193 I absolutely agree with you @ebeth ! The 3-5 year prognosis was published and made public before the two FDA antifibrotic drugs were approved, so the data is very much outdated but unfortunately its still readily available on Google and many other sites. Hope you continue to do as well as possible with this disease, thanks for sharing a bit of your story with us. Char.

    • October 26, 2022 at 9:46 am #33389 Hi All, Aside to all the known drugs that slow progression for us all, there is some encouraging research developments. I dont profess to understand it all, but if you care to Google “REMAP-ILD” then hopefully you will see what is happening right now. REMAP is a reconfigurable (that’s what the R is for) method of speeding up drug trials. It was used for COVID, and that is why the various Covid drugs came to market as soon as they did. We are all hoping that REMAP-ILD will get a drug that A) Stops the progression, and B) reverses the fibrosis. Wouldn’t that be something? PS I would be happy with (A) right now. Jeff in England.
    • October 27, 2022 at 3:52 pm #33404 I was diagnosed in October of 2017 and began takings esbriet in November. I have not had any significant decrease in my lung function and continue to be active. I do have to deal with fatigue and coughing but overall been manageable. Last PFT there was actually a slight improvement over the previous test. I too was. Dry concerned when the doctor told me the 3-5 life expectancy. I am 5 years removed and feel very fortunate and and hopeful for those like yourself.
    • October 27, 2022 at 4:02 pm #33406 Hi to everyone. I was originally going to reply to Pam at the very top, but after reading so many of these remarks, i guess what i have to say is for all of you die hards. (Pardon the pun!) I was diagnosed in late 2013 and was told the same as you all have been told, or if you are from the south, ya’ll have been told.3-5 years. I lived at 6000 feet altitude and after four years had gone bye, my pulmonologist (by the way, did you know the the word pulmonologist is not in the dictionary. So is it really a word?) said that i had to move to somewhere around sea level because the air at 6000 feet was waaaaay too thin. So i did. I am now at 300 ft. It is going on 9 years now and i have recently had to increase my oxygen that i have been on from time to time to almost full time. Not good! If i am sitting fairly still, maybe watching T V or on the computer my oxygen level is about 88 to 93, but if i get up to go to the bathroom, which is about 20 feet from where i was sitting, my oxygen drops to 82 ish and if i do anything physical like making the bed, or vacuuming my oxygen drops to 70 ish. This all tells me that my days are numbered. I find that my appetite has diminished and when i do eat, i have to go slow and usually can’t finish a normal size dinner although i do force it down as best as i can. I have been on OFEV for about 4 years and have had no side effects. But that is me. I have never had any kind f stomach problems all of my life no matter what i eat or drink. But i have never had a headache, and maybe 2 or 3 mild colds in my entire lifetime. I only get the big stuff, IPF and heart attacks. I will be 81 come January and i am hoping to see me age a little more. God willing!!! There are just somethings that we all have NO control over. So, i hope that some of you can reap the harvest from some of my words, like get the hell to sea level, take your OFEV as prescribed, do exercise as much as possible and hope for the best for all of us. No matter when we were diagnosed, we are all in the same boat. So row like hell and maybe some of us can last until some drug company wants to invest the time and money and find a cure before it’s too late. Sorry for bending your ear for so long, but i hope that it was worth it for some of you. Charles (Chuck) Gerson
      • October 29, 2022 at 2:27 pm #33420 Hi Charles. Read your entre and thought you sound a lot like me. I live at 4500 ft, on the Colorado, Utah line. It is considered high desert but just to the east of us start the mountains. They gradually go up until your at Silverthorn at 12,000. I was diagnosed in March of 2020 when I couldn’t get my breath, sweating like crazy. It took 3 hospitals and a biopsy to find out that I was minus 1 lung. I think I actually had IPF before this. I had an old lung doc who said I had emphysema. He never did anything to prove it or disprove. I was on an emergency inhaler. This was 2 years before the final diagnose. I was at my lung doctor yesterday and told some news we don’t like hear. I have been using an Inogen portable when out and about and a oxygen compactor at home set a 8. The Inogen only goes to 6 but not really. It is actually 4. She said I need to go back to the tank to get the help I need to walk or do anything. She said I am getting to the point of not being able to do anything and not traveling. She cancelled the volumn test for Dec. because she already knows what to expect. My wife was with me when we where told this, I haven’t told my kids yet. I don’t know exactly how to put it to them. My oxygen ranges from 92 down to the 70’s. Lately in the 80’s alot. She said that if things get much worse, it will be time for hospice. I am trying real hard to not to get to that point. I am trying to get help for my wife for around the house, none available we can afford.3 hours, once per week to do some house cleaning–$120. Well, Chuck, here’s to us and the other IPF people who are struggling too. Have a good weekend.
        • December 2, 2022 at 4:23 pm #33770 Hey Randy, I read this thread thoroughly and until I saw your post, I thought that I was alone. Around one year ago, I was treated for colon cancer. The surgeon did a great job, but the radiologist who read my CT scan, while looking for traces of cancer, saw my IPF. That diagnosis didn’t concern me. I was thrilled that I beat the cancer, and was working on getting back my energy. After 2 months, I suddenly couldn’t walk 500 yards without being very winded. I then had an exacerbation in April, and I thought I was dying. I didn’t, and so I saw a pulmonologist, an expert at a prestigious Boston hospital. I started on Efov, and oxygen. My lung capacity is decreasing rapidly. My sister had IPF, and died in 2 years. And she was a health nut. I was casual about my healthcare, and was a smoker. I worked as a roofer and never used a mask. I worked with asbestos, benzine vapors and many hazardous materials. And when I came home at night, I relaxed by working in my wood shop in my basement, causing clouds of dust. My luck ran out this year, and now 7-8 months since diagnosis, my O2 requirements are rapidly increasing. I don’t want to discourage any fellow IPF travelers, but my prognosis was 3-9 months. I’m sure that my lifestyle made my IPF inevitable. But I think of my younger sister.24 months. And I’ve read some studies that put life expectancy after diagnosis as 3-9 months. The point of my post is only to say that IPF is different with every person. I too have heard of people living 20 plus years after diagnosis. I wish the best for all my fellow IPF travelers. But for many of us, we should accept that it can move fast. I was always a believer, but my recent travails have increased my belief in the promises of Jesus, and I am happier and more contented than ever in my life. Trust in Him.
    • October 27, 2022 at 6:43 pm #33408 I was diagnosed with Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis and resultant Pulmonary Fibrosis at age 40 and transplanted at age 62, Four separate medical reviews including National Jewish in Denver. Began using O2 about 2 years prior to surgery. Now 6.25 years post-Txp. There IS HOPE! Don’t lose yours.
    • December 2, 2022 at 9:11 pm #33773 The best advice I every read was from the late Steve Jobs in a commencement speech he gave at Stanford in 2005, five years before he died of pancreatic cancer. Jobs says we should live each day as if it were our last day, as inevitably that (our last day) will be the case for all of us some day. It’s about attitude. Fix what you can and accept what you can’t. Most certainly, if you are a believer, then you know with confidence that God is with us each step of the way. With a chronic illness there are many struggles – physical, mental, physical, financial, and such. We must persevere. Enjoy each day and to the extent it is possible, be a blessing to others.
    • January 3, 2023 at 12:26 pm #34003 I was diagnosed in September 2015. I am 75 years young and still going strong, although I caught covid in June 2022 which added to the scaring significantly. I have now been approved for drug treatment to slow the progression down and apparently extend my life by up to a further three years. I do get highly breathless when undertaking any physical activity, but I can recover quickly. So I just carry on as normal! Dog walking, gardening, and DIY for instance, I just have to take little breaks every now and then. I trust this will help and encourage you.
    • January 3, 2023 at 2:36 pm #34007 I was diagnosed with FPF in Feb. of 2019 and on Esbrit since May 2021. No side effects. I don’t think anyone should avoid the two drugs because of side effects until you try them. Clinical trials show they can slow things down. No oxygen yet. Coughing and a lot of fatigue. Sept. scan showed no progress over June. My understanding is that the makers of Espirit have stated that their patients survive an average of nine years. Last month I added a diagnosis of Bronchitis which has been a son of a gun to overcome. But I am just getting better now and hope to get back to the treadmill.,
    • January 3, 2023 at 2:46 pm #34010 Hi, I was diagnosed July 2018 w/ IPF and prognosis was 5 years. Today 4-1/2 years later I’ve had very little worsening and see no reason why I shouldn’t go another 5 years or more. I work part time at Home Depot. This allows some physical activity along with the socialization I get from working with customers. I’m 74 and have been retired since 2008.
    • January 3, 2023 at 3:01 pm #34011 Hi! I was diagnosed in March 2016 but was suspected early. I was Esbriet for 6+ years but got off it due to all the side effects. They kept getting worse. I have now been off for15 months and feel much better. Quality of Life verses Quality of Life is my motto. I have not proceeded to get much worse – a little bit but know I have more years left. I do go to Pulmonary Rehab twice per week and I’m is very beneficial both for physical and metal health. Being with others with similar breathing issues creates a strong bond! I am 75 years old and plan on being around for awhile yet!
    • January 3, 2023 at 9:11 pm #34019 I was diagnosed 4 years ago due to Md thinking I had pneumonia, One doctor gave me 5 years. It’s not true cuz I have no symptoms.!!! Changed doctors and still no symptoms. Open up to self healing! Meditate daily. I am having more blowing tests but after changing pulmonologist he said there is no way I can tell how long! Don’t believe the crap and enjoy your life! If these tests come back ok I am going to say ” see you when I start a cough or sob!!!!! Nina????
    • January 4, 2023 at 8:48 pm #34016 DXD Jan 2012. Ended up losing my job, but was old enough to take retirement. Qualified for SS so did not have to face the uncertainty of looking for employment. Initially given a prognosis of 3-5 years possibly seven. Early on, I investigated clinical trials thinking that they might give me an opportunity to prolong my life or at least improve the quality of life. Did not qualify for either available trials for the medications we now call Ofev and Esbriet. Did get into early trial with Fibrogen which did improve my health. Unfortunately, after 3 years, Fibrogen felt it was too expensive to continue and the program closed for those of us on extensions. Started on Ofev the fall of 2016 and have been enjoying life despite the many side effects of which I have endured many of.diarrhea, muscle tears, dizziness, nausea, constipation, cramps, headaches, spontaneous bleeding have all been a part of the journey. Long story short.thousands of miles of travel by plane, car, motorcycle, RV.remodeling projectsjoys of being a grandparent have been my journey over the last 11 years since being diagnosed. I am currently going to begin the third (?) clinical trial, or is my fourth. But more importantly, I have just recently started using supplemental oxygen and then only for times of exertion. So, my story should tell you that the prognosis is something that a doctor will tell you based on historical data that is old. It is based on the numbers that are already three years old if not older. Everyday, new drugs are being tested, new treatments being evaluated, and more importantly new knowledge about this disease is coming to light. Information that helps people who are facing this disease now. So don’t despair because your doctor gave you a prognosis of 3-5 years. He is trying to give you an idea that your life, may be shorter than you anticipated. If anything, it should be a reminder that we are mortal. Don’t think of it as a goal, but just a reminder that all good things will come to an end.just probably not today and probably not tomorrow

      January 5, 2023 at 2:20 pm #34038 John, Thanks for sharing your jouney of 11 years and counting. Your story brings hope to those of us in despair and searching for an answer. Fibrogen has a Phase III trial ongoing. Are you in this trial? I am participitaing in another one called Teton 3 from United Therapeutics. There is also another Phase III trial from BI called Fibroneer. Any one of them can likely extend mortality for us. Are you on supplemental O2? After almost 28 months since diagnosis, my O2 is in the 98% range but my FVC and DLCO have both declined. I am confused about the results as I don’t feel much noticable change. Good luck to you and everyone else on the forum.

    • January 5, 2023 at 5:22 pm #34043 While working in the yard I started feeling more tired than I should have while sawing tree limbs, removing debris etc. so I went to see a thorasic doctor. That was around 2003. In 2005 I had both Lyme Disease and a Mold infection at the same time. It affected me a bit but I could still do my 1.5 mile jog. I was never a good runner and liked cycling morebut I switched it up. I did the 1.5 mile job on a Friday, Saturday had a crown replaced and felt lousy the entire weekend into Monday. Tuesday I went out for a jog and literally could not jog a block! My heart felt like it was going to burst out of my chest. CT Scan showed a mild sandstorm in each lung along with a cluster in each lung the size of a tennis ball. It scare the heck out of me. Diagnosed with IPF in 2005. The pulmonary function test I took showed Prednisone didn’t do much of anything straight into my lungs so I opted not to use it. I did probably 75-100 IV’s of either Hydrogen Peroxide, Ozone, and Vit C. I still exercise, don’t eat much junk food, never smoked cigs or weed, don’t consume alcohol, mostly veggie diet with eggs, salmon, sardines, sometimes shrimp, brown rice etc. I meditate, do yoga, do lift weights but not as often as I should. What sparked me to continue exercise is what a Surgeon who wanted to biopsy the part of my lung with NO scarring said when I told him I could walk OK on flat ground but the hills were a killer. His response”yeah, simple physics, the steeper the angle the harder the work”. So, one needs to exercise even with diminished lung capacity because the better shape you’re in the easier it is to perform a task. Last I checked with my spirometer my FEV1 was only 1.3-1.4 but I still have never used supplemental oxygen. One has to remember to breath deep and low.diaphragmatic breathing!! Also once in a while I do Wim Hoff breathing techniques. I had a bad sinus infection that threw me for a loop in Oct-Nov but I’m feeling better now. The downside is that I’m also prone to kidney stones and have to go and have laser treatment in a few weeks so it’s going to slow my recovery a bit. StillOne MUST keep a positive attitude! In a few months I’ll have been living with IPF for 18 years and I’m not going anywhere soon! I did read an article that said Metformin had an effect on reversing lung scarring so I need to do some research on that. I’m not big on medstried a fewdon’t agree with me. We also have 3 AirDoctor air filters in our house. For the guys there’s also a lot you can do, as you get older, to keep your “T” levels up. No alcohol, low sugar intake, eat only good fats, you need carbs but don’t overdue it. Yeah, my mistaketoo many carbs but I’ve changed that. Ohand this summer I turned 70, my hair is only about 40% gray, I’m not overweight, and have a SUPER supportive wife which also helps. OKso I hope you’re all doing well and perhaps have a little boost of confidence that you can, at the very least, slow the progression.
    • January 12, 2023 at 8:41 pm #34118 At the age of 69, I was diagnosed with IPF in June of 2015 and of course was given the 3-5 year lifespan. I am able to function on no oxygen but on rare occasions use it to sleep. When I travel I do carry it with me, especially on airplanes. My wife and I continue to walk 5 days a weeks on some local trails that vary in length from 2.5 to 4.0 miles. I am on OVEV at a very reduced prescription (100 mg per day) due to significant side effects. I am at peace with my future, whatever comes. At last check, there are none of us who make it without facing death. So, I try and face each day as a blessing that I may be able to be a blessing to someone else. Think a positive attitude is a critical component of facing a diagnosis of IPF.
    • January 18, 2023 at 5:55 pm #34194 I was diagnosed with basically the same information. I am happy to say, I am on year 20. I know I’m not the norm. The first year was the roughest, but mostly getting the medd to a tolerable level. I’m a firm believer in positive attitude, I had young children, and was basically told I wouldn’t be around to watch them graduate. My doctor had me set goals. Live to 50, watch my children graduate, turn 60, turn 65, become a grandmother. I’ve met all my goals, and still going strong. I have not let this disease define me or stop me from living the best life I can. There are tough days, but I just regroup, and keep going. About 6 years ago I started taking Ofev, it allowed me to go off other medications, I deal with the side affects the best I can, but I seriously feel better than I have in the previous years. Hang in there, make goals, keep moving. Good luck to you. ????
    • January 19, 2023 at 10:32 am #34201 I don’t know much about IPF or the treatments that are effective and have no idea why that 2-5 year life span. I can only go on my own experiences but I’m glad that there are people around who have survived and lived well past the five years. I live in London England where we have free health care but I rarely used it over the 62 years I’ve lived here. In fact I don’t take any medicine not ever aspirin. But I developed a cough in 1971 and my usual lemon and honey treatment did not have any effect but my partner insisted I see my GP more I think because it irritated her. My GP sent me to the hospital where they conducted various tests scans and what not, gyhwhich I found fascinating, and made more appointments and sent me home. Only when I googled did I find out I had at the most 5 years to live which I found disturbing but soon forgot all about it, except of course my every six-month each at two different hospitals were if anything I still found fascinating. There was a treatment they said but it was so expensive that only patients who had passed a certain stage could be put on and supplied with oxygen and other types of aid. This seemed to me much like closing the doors after the horses had escaped. They diagnosed my IPF when I was 80 in 2011 and here I am soon to be 92 not having talen any medicine excep for a while Omniprozle which is for acid reflux. My wife, 96 is in a care home and I visit her daily to help her eat (she has Alzimers and had a stroke which makes her wheelchair bound). This makes me walk 3 kiometers daily except when the weather is bad when I make use of our free freedom pass on tubes and buses. I must say though that I’ve lost 10 kg and feel not as able as I used to be. Perhaps the time has come to say goodbye to the world. Oh by the way I’m careful what I eat: lots of fruit and vegetables, no red meat. I also meditate and do yoga and am almost going vegan. And no sugar or milk, which anyway I never liked. Dark chocolate that’s my reward. I hope you can extract something out of this. Desmond
    • January 19, 2023 at 2:34 pm #34203 I am Chuck and i was diagnosed in 2013. I am 81 in 5 days. I have been on OFEV for the last 5 years or so and really believe that it has been very helpful. Hope that this helps.
    • January 20, 2023 at 7:30 am #34211 My first symptoms were experienced in 2015, with diagnosis in June 2018, following a lung biopsy. Since then, I had taken Esbriet for one year, discontinued because of a significant Erithroderma. I have been on Ofev for 3 years to date, with the “usual” side effects which are manageable. For the last three years I have been on O2 at two liters at night. My IPF progression has moved slowly, with long periods apparently dormant. The occasional decline seen in my PFTs have not been statistically significant. I am told that I present well clinically, which is consistent with my own view. I live alone in a rural area of VA and continue to manage my own groundskeeping on approximately six acres. My dogs, a Border Collie and a Dachshund provide valued companionship and quality time together outside. We three are compatible “seniors” (they’re 12 and 14 years old respectively). I’m 73 years old, retired from a senior management position in the railroad industry. I remain engaged and active as a 20-year member of our Volunteer Rescue Squad and within my Church I have managed a Scholarship Program for our college students for the past 11 years. I cannot overemphasize the value of such engagements, especially these and others that advance the principles of my faith. Many years ago, my flight instructor gave priceless direction when I was on final approach to my first landing: He said, “LOOK LONG!! You’re diving toward the numbers at the beginning of the runway!! Look instead at the numbers at the distant end!” I did as he suggested, and we made a perfect touchdown. My habit, in meeting with my Pulmonologist, is to ask his view of my “glidepath”. His guidance at diagnosis in 2018 was the standard 3-5 years, which means that 50% of us with IPF will SURVIVE FIVE YEARS. At our most recent examination, his prognosis remained the same: I have a 50% probability of surviving five years, considering my progression – so far – has been slow. Notwithstanding, I recognize the need to prepare for “The Greater Journey”. For this, I believe I will experience the Judgment of my Creator and my Redeemer, whose Judgment is complete and perfect, yet – by the mystery of faith – whose Mercy is even GREATER!! Perhaps your views will vary. I pray for comfort, healing, and abiding hope for all. Paul.
    • January 25, 2023 at 5:40 pm #34247 Truthfully no one is going to be able to tell you that they lived 7 years with PF and then died. We only have the day we are living in. The trick is not allowing yourself to compare your case to others. Every person is different. The amount of oxygen, hours used, test numbers, hours spent walking don’t really help you. Be reasonable, do what your doctor says to do, eat healthy meals, protect yourself from the thoughtless things some people say. If you are well today, be happy. If you need to start using oxygen therapy or raising your O2 level just do it and don’t worry about what other patients are doing. I don’t know why I have IPF, I was afraid of oxygen, I had to switch antifibrotics, I’ve had an exacerbation. Today I am feeling great. If that’s not true tomorrow I’ll call my pulmonologist. Keep moving forward, don’t stop to compare, do the next right thing no matter what others are doing.
      • January 26, 2023 at 2:21 pm #34253 Well, I will tell you that I was diagnosed bc I saw it on my chest scan results that, I had requested. And the doctor there said, I am sorry you have Interstitual Pulmonary Fibrosis. But, my doctor who is also a Pulmonologist never told me for two years, I kept going crazy thinking why am I coughing so much? That’s major medical negligence. So, I went to 5 other pulmonologists and each one was worse then the other, They didn’t ever give me cough syrup, so I thought then why are you a LUng Doctor? So annoying, I a now seeing an eighth doctor also a nightmare. I unfortunately moved back to New Jersey and it’s been a nightmare. I don’t have Medicare bc of my age, so my Insurance does not cover my Oxygen so, I will be paying it out of my pocket. Do any of you feel excruciating pain? Because I cough so much that, at times my lungs feel like I am getting whipped, I am constantly falling bc I lose oxygen in my brain. And this last doctor, I just came out and asked here, how much longer do, I have and she came out and said not that much. In a way it makes me try to move faster on days that, I have some energy so that, I can pack and leave to the Sunshine State. I think your question is a valid question. After all it is very sad and depressing for any human being to hear that they have a terminal illness.
        • January 26, 2023 at 2:53 pm #34255 Elle, if you have IPF you should qualify for Social Security Disability. There is a 24 month wait period after that and then you will qualify for Medicare. In the meantime, if you income has been affected (mine sure was, I could no longer work) you may qualify for Medicaid, depending on your assets, etc. Also, the medical company that I have for my oxygen had a sliding scale fee for the oxygen based on my income. I hope you find the Dr. that can help you.
    • January 26, 2023 at 2:54 pm #34256 I rarely participate in the forum but do scan it now and then. I felt sorry for you as you begin your search for understanding and answers to your questions. I took that time frame reference to heart and felt driven to ‘get my affairs in order quickly’. Seven and a half years later, my affairs are in order, have been corrected when friends moved away that were listed in my paperwork and very slowly I’m fading. There is nothing you can count on with IPF except it won’t go away! I live in the US and have been on and off Hospice twice. I have a wonderful supportive network of friends and neighbors. I live alone and all my kids/grandkids live 12 hours away. I have the best doctor who takes good care of me. I stopped going to a pulmonary doctor because the pulmonary function tests were always a little bit worse which would put me into depression for a week or so. I decided I could rely on the Pulse Ox to see if I needed to up the oxygen. I’ve been on 4L for about a year. Est thing I ever did was to go to the Pulmonary Workshop (not the real name but I can’t remember what it was. There my class learned everything we ever needed to know about the disease and the importance of exercise, diet, and how it might progress. I’m sure you’ve heard, no two cases are exactly alike. Ask your doctor if a class is offered in your area. I went from a very active person to a house-bound person. I’m just too tired to go anywhere. I’m currently looking for an assisted living facility. I don’t want to exhaust my friends with all my needs on top of the Ophir own. They would say it’s not a problem but they didn’t sign on for an eternity of care either. I’m 78 but have always been a long distance hiker, taken long car trips and stayed active in the community. Being house bound has been the biggest adjustment. I’ve had other health issues that complicate IPF. I have chronic spinal issues and all except the Thoracic region has been permanently fused with titanium cages and rods. I’m on high levels of pain meds because I can’t have anymore surgery to correct new spine bulges that cause pain. Things are not all gloom and doom. You meet incredible people in the medical field and I find out about services in you neighborhood. I’ve discovered I can donate my whole body to the medical schools of large Universities and made new friends at my local funeral home and Duke University. What an honor to let grad students see what IPF does to the lungs and maybe contribute to a discovery of a cure. I’m also a strong believer that Jesus is preparing a home for me in heaven. I keep reminding Him I don’t need a mansion, just a little cabin will do. I don’t fear death as many say but I could skip the final process! I hope you are as blessed as I am and your journey can even be exciting at times. You can contact me directly and I’ll do my best to answer any questions. This is a great forum with a lot of caring people who know a lot more than me.I always type too much. Hugs, Gweneeth
    • January 26, 2023 at 3:25 pm #34258 My older sister has IPF over 10 years. She tried both the prescribed meds and couldn’t tolerate either one. But she did stick with a prescribed exercise program until recently. She is finally having some trouble when moving around and uses supplemental oxygen. She is now 86 and hanging on.
    • March 9, 2023 at 12:00 am #34558 Everyone is different, even with the same flavor of PF. There is also a lot of research and a couple new meds coming online in next few years. One of which is considered a “breakthrough” drug by FDA, and is in Phase 3 trials right now. Here is a big study that has a lot of info on this. QUOTE: A recent analysis from the US Medicare database indicated that the median survival time in IPF was 3.8 years, with survival time decreasing sharply based on age at diagnosis. Patients between 66 and 69 years had a median survival of 8 years, compared with 4.5 years in those diagnosed between 75 and 79 years, and 2.5 years in those diagnosed at ≥80 years. Demographics and survival of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in the FinnishIPF registry – PMC (nih.gov)
    • March 9, 2023 at 9:33 am #34563 Anyone have information on lung trandfustion life span???
    • March 9, 2023 at 3:39 pm #34571 I was diagnosed in 2014 and am still in the moderate range. Text book longevity is not accurate. I will add you to my prayer list. It out of our hands now.
    • March 9, 2023 at 5:12 pm #34572 I was diagnosed in March of 2018, but I’m pretty sure I had it for a few years before that. I’m currently considered ‘Stable’ and on 2L of O2 resting. I will be turning 60 on the 27th of this month. I know that every person is different. I also have other health issues I’m dealing with along with the IPF.
    • March 9, 2023 at 5:12 pm #34573 I was diagnosed in March of 2018, but I’m pretty sure I had it for a few years before that. I’m currently considered ‘Stable’ and on 2L of O2 resting. I will be turning 60 on the 27th of this month. I know that every person is different. I also have other health issues I’m dealing with along with the IPF.
    • March 9, 2023 at 5:54 pm #34576 I was diagnosed with IPF in 2003, probably had it longer. I was concerned about the 3-5 years. I went to Mayo to find out. I was diagnosed with another lung disease in 1973 that probably caused IPF ( not sure) but it meant that IPF was not the primary diagnosis. I had problems breathing for about 5 years, but finally starting using oxygen in 2003. I took disability in 2009. I had trouble doing anything. Being on oxygen and medicine for a couple of years my health improved. I’m on 3L during the day and 4L at night. I’m 70 and have been on oxygen for 20 years and I’m in better shape than I was when I took disability. There are lots of things I can’t do but I can do almost anything I want too bad enough. I play golf once or twice a week wearing oxygen. My pace is much slower but the progression has really slowed. I have no idea on prognosis. It is just one day at a time and I’m grateful for everyday.
    • March 10, 2023 at 5:32 am #34586 Hi Pam. Having lost two friends to IPF at around 2.5 years after their diagnosis I was shocked and dismayed when I learned of my diagnosis on MyChart. I am now three years out (with a different pulmonologist) and approaching 68 years old. The disease has barely advanced at all in that time and I am still not on oxygen. I initially was on OFEV for a year but the side effects made life intolerable for me. I did not start Esbriet and two years later I’m still good. Exercise and keeping up muscle mass as I age has helped a great deal. I use Boost Oxygen when I need a little extra to recover after exercise, walking uphill or up steps, etc. Overall my quality of life is excellent. Some people have a longer form of the disease than others. Faith in God, prayer, exercise, a supportive community, and a positive attitude are all helpful to living a good life with IPF. Hope this helps. I’ll be praying for you.
    • March 27, 2023 at 3:08 pm #34759 My mom survived 10 years from diagnosis! Never give up! I am three years post diagnosis and am going to beat this!!!! I truly believe a positive attitude plays a huge roll in our health. Prayers for you and all that have PF themselves or someone close to them!
    • May 8, 2023 at 1:23 pm #34985 is it okay if o2 levels go to 92 when activity or walk?
    • May 9, 2023 at 2:16 pm #34988 Pam and all others. I was diagnosed in 10 13. That’s ten years. I have been on OFEV for the last five or so. Although i am not active anymore and am on oxygen a lot, i am still on this earth. Don’t believe everything you read. Charles Gerson
    • May 9, 2023 at 3:03 pm #34992 Yes many, 11 years and more. No one knows for sure when they are going to die, try not to put all your energy in feeling bad about the life you have and do the best you can now.
    • May 9, 2023 at 3:43 pm #34996 My mother lived 10 years post diagnosis. I don’t think that is what actually caused her demise. She was 84 years old. Don’t ever give up and try to stay positive. That’s half the battle. As for myself I am in my third year since diagnosis. It will be four years in December. I feel great and tell myself I AM going to beat this!!! I wish you the best!!!!
    • May 10, 2023 at 5:56 am #35001 I was diagnosed in 2014 and on oxygen starting in January 2015. Take Esbriet and nitric oxide from a pump connected to my oxygen system. I am stable with a 50% lung capacity. I ride my Motorcycle weather permitting, also have a Convertible sports car that I drive. I am 80 years old and a widower who loves riding my motorcycle, I strap my oxygen tank on the back and away I ride. Last ride was 96 miles, only stopped for gas and stop 🛑 signs. With all that said, think positive and follow the doctor’s orders and enjoy your life.
    • May 13, 2023 at 4:07 pm #35021 Hello Everyone, I chime in to these discussions once in a while. I’m retired and will be turning 70 (Not Old) next month. I was diagnosed back in July of 2018 and was put on OFEV in January 2019. Just recently I’ve been able to cope with the side effects of this medication. My Mom died of this disease back in 2000, and back then there were no anti- fibrotic medications. The doctors treated her with Steroids, she lasted 10 years. As for me, at first I was a little depressed sitting at home by myself always on the computer looking up this IPF disease to see if there was anything new in way of a cure, but to no avail, So I said to myself, self, its time to get off your A$$ and do something rather than moping around. So I planted a vegetable garden in our backyard, and when I went to the Garden Center to buy our vegetables, I asked the owner for a job. Since I was in construction most of my life, I figured why not. I told the owner that I know how to drive dump trucks, and operate heavy equipment. He gave me the job on the spot. It’s a part-time gig, but at least it keeps my mind off of the inevitable. I meet new people every day and have a great time with the people I work with. At the end of the day, that’s what it’s all about. Basically we all have a cross to bear and this is ours. So live life to the fullest and do the best you can with what you are given. What I’m trying to say is that every person is different and responds differently to this disease. Find something you like to do and do it. By the way, I have to give my wife a special thanks for being there for me while I am going through this ordeal.
    • May 16, 2023 at 10:33 pm #35062 Pam, every ILD is different. I was diagnosed in 2016 and I knew I had a lung issue since I play hockey. It was progressing fairly rapidly so I went to the pulmonologist had a CT scan and got diagnosed. I did some research and found a company with many documented cases of improvement with the use of Chinese herbs (WEI Labs). Their protocol is a 90 day treatment of the herbs. I was struggling to play hockey because of my breathing but the herbs seemed to stop the progression of the disease. I am 73 and I’m playing hockey but taking shorter shifts. I have had breathlessness since I had Covid and have had long Covid for 15 months. Several others on this site have tried the herbs with good results, one went off oxygen. They are expensive. Denny
    • May 16, 2023 at 10:33 pm #35063 Pam, every ILD is different. I was diagnosed in 2016 and I knew I had a lung issue since I play hockey. It was progressing fairly rapidly so I went to the pulmonologist had a CT scan and got diagnosed. I did some research and found a company with many documented cases of improvement with the use of Chinese herbs (WEI Labs). Their protocol is a 90 day treatment of the herbs. I was struggling to play hockey because of my breathing but the herbs seemed to stop the progression of the disease. I am 73 and I’m playing hockey but taking shorter shifts. I have had breathlessness since I had Covid and have had long Covid for 15 months. Several others on this site have tried the herbs with good results, one went off oxygen. They are expensive. Denny
  • Author Posts
You might be interested:  How To Treat Gf

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

What climate is best for pulmonary fibrosis?

Staying Cool with IPF – The first rule of survival in very hot climates is stay out of the sun. Plan your day accordingly. Make doctor appointments for early morning. If you have chores, do them either in the morning or after the sun sets. Simply adjusting your schedule to get up earlier may allow you to be outside before the temperature reaches triple digits.

Don’t pinch pennies on your air conditioner. If your finances permit, use your air conditioner. Find a temperature that is comfortable for you. Most patients find that mid-70’s strikes the right balance. Keep the blinds drawn and the windows closed during the day. If your temperatures drop in the evening, then take advantage of a cross breeze and open some windows.

High humidity means that there is more water content in the air. This makes the air heavier. As the air gets heavier, it is harder to breath for most patients with chronic lung disease. Most air conditioners remove moisture from the environment. So using your air conditioner will not only cool the air but remove humidity.

How fast does lung fibrosis progress?

Pulmonary fibrosis often gets worse over time. No one can predict how fast a patient’s PF will progress. In some people, PF progresses very quickly while others live with the disease for many years.

What is the newest treatment for pulmonary fibrosis?

An experimental anticancer drug called saracatinib shows promise as a treatment for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF), a chronic and often fatal condition that causes scarring or fibrosis of the lungs and makes breathing difficult. The study, funded by NHLBI, appears in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine,

  1. Two FDA-approved drugs, nintedanib and pirfenidone, are currently used to slow IPF disease progression, but they have side effects and do not completely relieve symptoms or cure the disease.
  2. Better drugs are needed, the researchers said.
  3. In the new study, the researchers identified saracatinib as a candidate for treating IPF by using computational predictions that screened drug candidates for anti-fibrotic effects.
You might be interested:  Muscle Pain Remedies At Home

The researchers then exposed the drug to human lung cells in culture and found that it could reverse the disease signature of IPF. The researchers also tested the drug on lung fibroblasts, the cells that accumulate in lung scars, obtained from IPF patients who received transplants.

Is lung scarring always fibrosis?

Interstitial lung disease and pulmonary fibrosis – Pulmonary fibrosis isn’t just one disease. It is a family of more than 200 different lung diseases that all look very much alike. The PF family of lung diseases is part of an even larger group of diseases called interstitial lung diseases (also known as ILD), which includes all of the diseases that have inflammation and/or lung scarring.

Does alcohol affect pulmonary fibrosis?

DISCUSSION – In this study we determined that chronic alcohol ingestion promoted an aberrant fibrotic response to bleomycin-induced experimental acute lung injury. Specifically, the lungs of alcohol-fed mice developed significant fibrosis at two weeks after bleomycin treatment while the lungs of control-fed mice displayed typical recovery from the acute injury with little evidence of fibrosis.

Consistent with these gross histological changes, chronic alcohol ingestion increased the expression and activation of TGFβ1 following bleomycin-induced lung injury and, in parallel (or perhaps as a direct consequence), increased the deposition of mature collagen in the injured lung tissue. In contradistinction, treatment with the glutathione precursor SAMe attenuated the aberrant fibrotic responses induced by chronic alcohol ingestion through direct effect on the lung fibroblasts.

To our knowledge, these results provide the first experimental evidence that chronic alcohol ingestion promotes the development of fibrosis following bleomycin-induced acute lung injury. As alcohol abuse dramatically increases the risk of ARDS, a devastating form of acute lung injury for which there are no effective pharmacological therapies, our experimental findings suggest that these vulnerable individuals may also have dysfunctional repair mechanisms that could be amenable to treatment with thiol anti-oxidants such as SAMe to prevent long-term consequences such as the development of a prolonged fibroproliferative phase or even irreversible pulmonary fibrosis.

  • Our group had previously identified that chronic alcohol abuse is associated with a 2–4-fold increased incidence of ARDS ( Moss et al., 1996, Moss et al., 2003 ).
  • Although the pathological effects of chronic alcohol ingestion on the development of liver fibrosis had been well established ( Beier et al., 2011 ), to our knowledge there have been no studies examining whether chronic alcohol ingestion promotes disrepair and fibrosis following acute inflammatory lung injury.
You might be interested:  Which Doctor To Consult For Leg Nerve Pain

However, there were many reasons to predict that alcohol could interfere with normal reparative processes in the lung. Specifically, we identified that chronic alcohol ingestion produces a previously unrecognized state of severe oxidative stress and cellular dysfunction within the lung as reflected by decreased glutathione levels ( Guidot et al., 1999 ), increased fibronectin expression ( Brown et al., 2007 ), and increased expression and activation of TGFβ1 ( Bechara et al., 2004 ); each of these factors has been implicated in the development of pulmonary fibrosis ( Coward et al., 2010 ).

  1. Therefore, we hypothesized that chronic alcohol ingestion alters lung repair processes and promotes fibrosis formation following acute inflammatory injury.
  2. In our current study, we determined that alcohol-fed mice developed overt lung fibrosis 14 days after bleomycin-induced lung injury, as evidenced by histological analyses (Masson’s trichrome staining) and increased protein content of hydroxyproline, whereas the lungs of mice that did not ingest alcohol (control-fed) recovered back to baseline with little to no evidence of tissue fibrosis.

In light of our previous studies showing that alcohol ingestion induces the expression of TGFβ1 expression in the lung ( Bechara et al., 2004 ), we suspected that TGFβ1 was a mediator of alcohol-induced susceptibility to fibrosis following acute lung injury and this study provides circumstantial evidence in support of such a role.

  • TGFβ1 is known to promote extracellular matrix (ECM) production and accumulation along with mesenchymal cell (i.e.
  • Fibroblast) proliferation and differentiation, all of which appear to contribute to the development of fibrosis during the repair phase of tissue injury ( Biernacka et al., 2011 ).
  • Under healthy conditions, there is very little TGFβ1 protein expressed in the lung and most of it is in a latent form that is bound to the ECM.

During acute inflammation, the latent TGFβ1 is released and activated by both proteolytic and oxidative mechanisms ( Biernacka et al., 2011, Beier et al., 2011 ). Excessive alcohol ingestion increases the expression of TGFβ1 in various tissues including the liver and the lung, and this TGFβ1 expression is associated with the development of liver fibrosis (cirrhosis) ( Beier et al., 2011 ).

  • In parallel, TGFβ1 is increased in the lung lavage fluid and the lung tissue of rats and humans following chronic alcohol ingestion ( Bechara et al., 2004, Brown et al., 2007, Brown and Brown, 2012 ).
  • Therefore, we hypothesized that the alcohol-mediated susceptibility to fibrosis following lung injury would be associated with, if not caused by, increased TGFβ1 expression in the lung as well as its activation and release into the airspace.

The new experimental findings in this study support that hypothesis. A previous study in a similar mouse model of bleomycin-induced lung injury showed that TGFβ1 mRNA expression was induced and peaked within 5–7 days after treatment, and that TGFβ1protein expression persisted up to 10–14 days after initial treatment but declined back to baseline thereafter.

However, these changes varied among strains of mice ( Phan and Kunkel, 1992, Zhang et al., 1995 ). In the current study we used a relatively lower dose of bleomycin (a single dose of 2.5 units/kg) than has been typically used in this model. We intentionally induced a milder lung injury in control-fed animals so that we could identify any exacerbating effects of chronic alcohol ingestion.

At 14 days following initiation of acute lung injury, we found modest elevation of activated TGFβ1 expression in the lung lavage fluid of control-fed mice compared to uninjured control-fed groups. In this study, alcohol feeding alone was associated with trend toward increased levels of activated TGFβ1 in the lung lavage fluid as compared to uninjured control-fed mice; however, these changes were not statistically significant.

This is consistent with our previous studies in which we determined that TGFβ1 levels were increased in the lung lavage fluid of alcohol-fed rats compared to control-fed rats during acute endotoxemia ( Bechara et al., 2004 ). However, there was no detectable TGFβ1 in the lavage fluid of either alcohol-fed or control-fed rats in the absence of endotoxemia.

In fact, the primary finding in that study was that chronic alcohol ingestion increased the expression of the latent (inactive) form of TGFβ1 in the lung tissue, and we speculated that this has few if any detectable effects in the otherwise healthy alcoholic lung but sets the stage for TGFβ1 activation and epithelial barrier disruption during acute inflammatory stress.

Consistent with those earlier findings, in this study we identified an increase in active TGFβ1 in the alveolar space (lung lavage fluid) of alcohol-fed mice 14 days following initiation of acute lung injury and when aberrant fibroproliferation is evident. Altogether, these experimental findings complement our previous studies and provide novel circumstantial evidence that the induction and activation of TGFβ1 may be causally implicated in alcohol-mediated priming of a ‘pro-fibrotic’ response to acute inflammatory lung injury.

Although the mechanisms by which alcohol induces TGFβ1 expression and thereby augments fibrosis following acute lung injury are still being investigated, oxidative stress and glutathione depletion appear to play a central role ( Guidot et al., 1999, Moss et al., 2000 ).

Therefore, we predicted that dietary supplementation with a glutathione precursor would mitigate the fibrosis in alcohol-fed mice in response to bleomycin-induced acute lung injury. SAMe is an intermediate step in the endogenous synthesis of glutathione but also has its own effects as a thiol anti-oxidant as well as being a key methyl donor.

We have previously shown that dietary supplementation with glutathione precursors such as SAMe, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or procysteine prevents alcohol-induced TGFβ1 expression and the associated alveolar epithelial and macrophage dysfunction that increases the susceptibility to acute lung injury in experimental models ( Holguin et al., 1998, Velasquez et al., 2002, Bechara et al., 2004, Gauthier et al., 2009 ).

Consistent with these salutary effects in those previous studies, we determined that SAMe treatment decreased the activation of TGFβ1 and the associated (if not consequent) aberrant fibrosis in the alcohol-fed mice following bleomycin-induced acute lung injury. We further demonstrated that SAMe directly suppressed the lung fibroblasts activation as shown by decreased TGFβ1 mRNA expression and attenuated fibroblast to myofibroblasts transdifferentiation as shown by decreased α-SMA-1 mRNA expression in the dose dependent manner.

Clearly the findings in an experimental model must be interpreted with caution, as clinical studies of NAC treatment did not show any benefit in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis ( Homma et al., 2012, Meyer et al., 1994, Behr et al., 2009 ) despite its benefit as a preventative measure in an animal model ( Sugiura et al., 2009 ).

  • However, the potential efficacy of NAC for IPF is still being evaluated in clinical trials.
  • Further, there may be an important window of opportunity between the onset of lung injury and the development of disrepair and fibroproliferative abnormalities that likely precedes the formation of ‘fixed’ lung fibrosis.

In addition, fibroproliferation and disrepair following acute lung injury prolongs hospitalization and delays functional recovery in many acute illnesses that have no relationship to IPF. In that regard, strategies such as SAMe (or NAC) might be effective in more acute settings such as ARDS when fibroproliferation, but not yet end-stage and ‘fixed’ fibrosis, is present.

Importantly, individuals with underlying alcohol use disorders may well benefit the most from this therapeutic strategy. Specifically, SAMe and/or other glutathione precursors may be able to delimit the formation of lung fibrosis but may have little or no effect on resolving established fibrosis. Therefore, the salutary effects of SAMe in this experimental model raise the possibility that such strategies could promote tissue repair and limit fibroproliferative changes following acute lung injury, particularly in individuals with alcohol abuse who are at such high risk for ARDS and its associated morbidity and mortality.

In summary, we determined that chronic alcohol ingestion renders the experimental mouse lung susceptible to the development of pulmonary fibrosis following bleomycin-induced acute lung injury. Alcohol-mediated susceptibility to lung fibrosis was associated with increased expression and activation of the pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 and increased collagen deposition as seen by increased in hydroxyproline content in the lungs.

Consistent with our previous studies showing that alcohol-induced expression of TGFβ1 is mediated by oxidative stress and glutathione depletion, the aberrant fibrotic response was completely inhibited by dietary supplementation with SAMe, a thiol-containing anti-oxidant and glutathione precursor. To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates not only a delayed pathological effect of chronic alcohol ingestion on lung repair following acute inflammatory injury, but also that alcohol-mediated susceptibility to disrepair and fibrosis can be modified with a relatively simple dietary intervention.

Taken together, these findings suggest that such a strategy could have salutary effects in individuals at high risk for acute lung injury and delayed resolution of tissue injury because of underlying chronic alcohol abuse.

Is coffee bad for pulmonary fibrosis?

Abstract – Caffeine is a commonly used food additive found naturally in many products. In addition to potently stimulating the central nervous system caffeine is able to affect various systems within the body including the cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

Importantly, caffeine is used clinically to treat apnoea and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature babies. Recently, caffeine has been shown to exhibit antifibrotic effects in the liver in part through reducing collagen expression and deposition, and reducing expression of the profibrotic cytokine TGFβ.

The potential antifibrotic effects of caffeine in the lung have not previously been investigated. Using a combined in vitro and ex vivo approach we have demonstrated that caffeine can act as an antifibrotic agent in the lung by acting on two distinct cell types, namely epithelial cells and fibroblasts.

Caffeine inhibited TGFβ activation by lung epithelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner but had no effect on TGFβ activation in fibroblasts. Importantly, however, caffeine abrogated profibrotic responses to TGFβ in lung fibroblasts. It inhibited basal expression of the α-smooth muscle actin gene and reduced TGFβ-induced increases in profibrotic genes.

Finally, caffeine reduced established bleomycin-induced fibrosis after 5 days treatment in an ex vivo precision-cut lung slice model. Together, these findings suggest that there is merit in further investigating the potential use of caffeine, or its analogues, as antifibrotic agents in the lung.

Eywords: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Caffeine (1,3,7-tri-methylxanthine) is one of the most commonly consumed food additives worldwide and has wide-ranging pharmacological activities including effects on the central nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. It can act as an antagonist of adenosine receptors, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases and an activator of ryanodine receptors.

Caffeine is similar in structure and function to theophylline and can improve lung function in asthmatics by inducing bronchodilation.1 Furthermore, caffeine citrate (Calficit) is clinically approved and commonly used to treat bronchopulmonary dysplasia and apnoea in premature infants.2 In recent years, caffeine has been shown to exhibit antifibrotic effects in the liver.

Consumption of caffeine, often in the form of coffee, is associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis in patients suffering from chronic hepatitis C virus infection.3 In in vivo animal models of liver fibrosis caffeine can reduce collagen deposition and collagen mRNA, 4 5 and can block expression of the profibrotic cytokine TGFβ.6 Furthermore, caffeine can inhibit profibrotic responses in hepatic stellate cells, the key effector cell in the development of liver fibrosis.7 Despite the known effects of caffeine on lung function the potential antifibrotic effects of caffeine in the lung have not previously been investigated.

In the present study we have used a combination of in vitro cell and ex vivo tissue approaches to investigate the hypothesis that caffeine can inhibit fibrogenesis in the lung. The pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis is thought to involve activation of TGFβ by lung epithelial cells following repeated microinjury to the epithelium, causing transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into profibrotic myofibroblasts, which ultimately leads to deposition of extracellular matrix within the lung interstitium and deteriorating lung function and/or death.

  1. We have demonstrated that caffeine inhibits endogenous TGFβ activation in immortalised human bronchial epithelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner by measuring levels of phosphorylated Smad2 (P-Smad2) ( figure 1 A).
  2. Furthermore, basal levels of the TGFβ-induced gene PAI1 were inhibited by caffeine over 24 h ( figure 1 B).

Importantly, the effect of caffeine on TGFβ activation was specific to epithelial cells since caffeine had no effect on endogenous TGFβ activation in lung fibroblasts isolated from either non-fibrotic control (NL) donors or patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) ( figure 1 C). (A) Immortalised human bronchial epithelial cells (iHBECs) were stimulated with increasing concentrations of caffeine for 4 hours and PSmad2 levels measured. Figure shows mean data±SEM from three independent experiments. (B) iHBECs were stimulated with 50 µM caffeine and PAI1 mRNA levels measured. Data are expressed as mean fold change over control (0 h)±SEM from three independent experiments. (C) Non-fibrotic control (NL) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) fibroblasts were stimulated with increasing concentrations of caffeine and TGFβ activation assessed by TMLC reporter assay. Figure shows mean data±SEM from n=3 NL and n=3 IPF donors. (D) NL and IPF fibroblasts were stimulated with 50 µM caffeine and ACTA2 mRNA levels measured. Data are expressed as mean fold change over control (0 h for NL or IPF, respectively)±SEM. Figure shows mean data from n=3 NL and n=3 IPF donors. *p<0.05 **p<0.01. Increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in fibroblasts is a key marker of fibroblast-myofibroblast transdifferentiation. We therefore assessed the effect of caffeine on expression of α-SMA ( ACTA2 ) transcript in NL and IPF fibroblasts as a surrogate for measuring fibroblast-myofibroblast transdifferentiation. Caffeine inhibited basal ACTA2 mRNA expression in both diseased and control fibroblasts ( figure 1 D) suggesting that it can interrupt fibroblast-myofibroblast transdifferentiation, a key fibrogenic process. To further investigate the effect of caffeine on profibrotic responses in lung fibroblasts we investigated caffeine's actions on TGFβ-induced gene expression. TGFβ increased expression of PAI1, ACTA2 a nd TGFB1 i n IPF fibroblasts after 24 h and caffeine abrogated these responses ( figure 2 A–C). This effect was also observed in NL fibroblasts (see online supplementary figure s E–G). Together these in vitro data demonstrate that caffeine may inhibit fibrogenesis through concomitant, but distinct, actions on both epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts. It has previously been suggested that inhibition of PDE4 can mediate TGFβ-induced fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation, therefore we hypothesised that caffeine's actions on TGFβ-induced fibroblast responses might be mediated via PDE4.8 To investigate this further we used the PDE4 inhibitor roflumilast. Treatment of IPF fibroblasts with 10 µM roflumilast did not recapitulate the effects of caffeine on TGFβ-induced PAI1, ACTA2 and TGFB1 mRNA expression ( figure 2 D–F). These data suggest the inhibitory effect of caffeine on TGFβ-induced gene expression is independent of its effects on PDE4. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) fibroblasts were pretreated with 0 μM or 50 μM caffeine for 30 min then stimulated with 0 ng/mL or 2 ng/mL TGFβ for 24 h and (A) PAI1; (B) ACTA2; (C) TGFB1 gene expression measured. Data are expressed as mean fold change over control (0 h, 0 ng/mL TGFβ)±SEM from experiments performed on cells from three individual donors. IPF fibroblasts were pretreated with 0 μM or 10 μM roflumilast for 30 min then stimulated with 0 ng/mL or 2 ng/mL TGFβ for 24 h and (D) PAI1; (E) ACTA2; (F) TGFB1 gene expression measured. Data are expressed as mean fold change over control (0 h, 0 ng/mL TGFβ)±SEM from experiments performed on cells from four individual donors. (G) Precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) were prepared from the lungs of saline-treated and bleomycin-treated mice and collagen levels measured after 5 days in ex vivo culture. Data are expressed as mean collagen (mg) per mg of lung tissue±SEM from n=16 PCLS/group. (H) PCLS were prepared from the lungs of bleomycin-treated or saline-treated mice and treated for 5 days ex vivo with 0 μM, 25 μM, 50 μM and 100 μM caffeine. Data are expressed as mean collagen (mg) per mg of lung tissue±SEM from n=6 bleomycin PCLS or n=2 saline PCLS. *p<0.05, **p<0.01, ****p<0.0001. Finally, to confirm that caffeine can act as an antifibrotic agent in the lung, we have used a novel ex vivo precision-cut lung slice (PCLS) model of pulmonary fibrosis. PCLS were prepared from mice treated with either bleomycin or saline control for 28 days and the presence of fibrosis determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. PCLS from bleomycin-treated animals contained significantly higher levels of collagen than PCLS from saline-treated animals ( figure 2 D). Crucially, caffeine was also able to significantly reduce collagen deposition in a concentration-dependent manner over 5 days within bleomycin-PCLS ( figure 2 E). These data demonstrate for the first time that caffeine can act as an antifibrotic agent in the lung. Concentrations of caffeine achieved physiologically are generally less than 70 µM caffeine, 9 furthermore, previous in vivo animal studies have shown antifibrotic effects in the liver with serum concentrations ranging from 38 µM to 59 µM.4 Our studies showed antifibrotic effects at concentrations between 50 µM and 100 µM supporting the hypothesis that physiological concentrations of caffeine may have antifibrotic effects in the lung. In the lung, caffeine appears to exhibit its antifibrotic effects through distinct actions on both epithelial cells and fibroblasts, which are two of the key effector cells involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. It has previously been reported that caffeine is capable of interrupting TGFβ-induced Smad signalling in a lung epithelial cancer cell line.10 However, these data demonstrate that caffeine can also inhibit endogenous TGFβ activation by lung epithelial cells, which is the first report showing that caffeine can inhibit endogenous TGFβ activation in any cell type. Additionally, caffeine can interrupt fibroblastic profibrotic responses to TGFβ and these data show that caffeine inhibits TGFβ-induced increases in profibrotic genes including PAI1, ACTA2 and TGFB1. This finding supports existing data from the liver showing that caffeine can interrupt profibrotic responses, particularly collagen and TGFβ expression in mesenchymal cells.4–6 Taken together, the data described highlight a potentially important role for caffeine and its analogues in the treatment of fibrotic lung disease.

Does walking help pulmonary fibrosis?

Tips for Staying Active with PF –

Enroll in a pulmonary rehabilitation program. Pulmonary rehab is a program of exercise, education and support to help you learn to breathe and get stronger. Some activities often done in pulmonary rehab include walking on a treadmill, riding a stationary bike, stretching and light weight training.Use your oxygen, Many patients find that using oxygen when they exercise is a game changer. They can be more active with less worry.Be active every day. This might be as simple as walking to get the mail. It can be tempting to spend most of your day sitting when you are feeling fatigued and breathless. Leave time for rest but also try and push yourself to move around as much as possible. Breathing exercises such as belly breathing and pursed lip breathing can help your lungs be more efficient.

What makes pulmonary fibrosis worse?

Occupational and environmental factors – Long-term exposure to a number of toxins and pollutants can damage your lungs. These include:

Silica dust Asbestos fibers Hard metal dusts Coal dust Grain dust Bird and animal droppings

What Chinese herbs are used to treat pulmonary fibrosis?

Introduction – Pulmonary fibrosis, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and interstitial lung fibrosis (secondary to conditions such as SSc and rheumatoid arthritis) are particularly severe lung diseases characterized by epithelial injury, impaired wound healing and accumulation of fibroblasts as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) in the lung 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,

Pulmonary fibrosis is a notably complex form of lung disease resulting from various factors 6, With the benefit of a wide range of targets, some traditional medications have been shown to be advantageous in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. Shen-mai-kai-fei-san (Shenks) is a Chinese herbal preparation that was developed by Yiling Hospital, affiliated to Hebei Medical University.

Crucially, Shenks has been shown to be effective in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis (including scleroderma-related fibrosis). However, mechanistic studies delineating the anti-fibrotic mechanisms behind Shenks treatment for pulmonary fibrosis remain scarce.

  • Fibrogenesis is influenced by a variety of cytokines, among which transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is the most potent stimulator of collagen production 7,
  • Numerous studies have clarified the pathways of TGF-β involvement in the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes as well as the pathogenesis of fibrosis 8, 9, 10,

Oxidant stress, which results from excessive ROS production and defects in, or the depletion of, antioxidant defenses, is one of the major mechanisms present in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis 11, 12, 13, 14, In cystic fibrosis patients, antioxidant defenses that are ordinarily capable of dealing with elevated oxidative stress are dysfunctional, leading to the occurrence of pulmonary cystic fibrosis 15,

Moreover, evidence has suggested that a causal agent of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) might be an imbalance between oxidant/antioxidant in the lungs of sufferers 13, 16, 17, Finally, some antioxidant agents have the ability to prevent the development of experimental pulmonary fibrosis 18, 19,

As it is compatible with the medicinal criteria termed “Jun, Chen, Zuo, Shi”, Shenks is composed of the following active ingredients: Panaxquinquefolius, Ophiopogon japonicas, Salvia miltiorrhizaBge, Gynostemmapentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino, AmygdalusCommunis Vas, Scutellari  +  abarbata D.

  1. Don, Lysimachiahui Diels, and Perillafrutescens,
  2. Among these components in the Shenks formula, Panaxquinquefolius is the “Jun” medicine, or the principal component with the main therapeutic activity.
  3. Ophiopogon japonicas, Salvia miltiorrhizaBge, and Gynostemmapentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino are the “Chen” medicines, or the secondary principal components of the formula used to enhance or assist the effect of the principal constituent.

The rest are the “Zuo” and “Shi” components of the formula, and function to treat accompanying symptoms, enhance the delivery of herbal ingredients, and/or control the toxicity of the primary components 20, 21, Panaxquinquefolius, with its anti-oxidative stress property, has also been reported to prevent glucose-induced injury in endothelial cells and H 2 O 2 -induced damage in rat lung cells 22, 23,

  1. Salvia miltiorrhiza, a secondary principal component, was found to exert an anti-fibrotic effect and inhibit experimental skin fibrosis via a TGF-β signaling pathway 24,
  2. In addition, its active component, salvianolic acid, is capable of attenuating liver fibrosis via TGF-β-related signaling pathways 25,

Thus, we speculate that the Salvia miltiorrhiza in the Shenks formula exerts its anti-fibrotic effect via TGF-β/Smad signaling. Gynostemiapentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino has been reported to inhibit PDGF-induced type I procollagen expression 26 and attenuate liver fibrosis 27,

What is the Chinese medicine for lung problems?

1. Prevention – According to clinical manifestations of patients who infected with COVID-19, it can be classified as “wet, heat, congestion”, in their lungs. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, we believe that lungs are delicate, so the disease first affects lungs’ function.

  1. Wet” refers to the factor with sticky and heavy turbidity that can cause a long course of disease and damage the function of the body.
  2. Hot” refers to the factor with hot, dry, and rising turbidity that can cause disease.
  3. Congestion” is a causative factor that can congest blood circulation and cause symptoms such as pain.

Traditional Chinese medicine believes that Qi is the basic substance that constitutes the human body and maintains basic functions. We divide Qi into the healthy Qi and the pathogenic Qi. The healthy Qi refers to substances that maintain the normal operation of our body.

The pathogenic Qi refers to substances that can harm the health of our body. Therefore, the aim of preventive treatment of TCM is to protect lungs. Yupingfeng San, a kind of preventative patent medicine, is chosen because of the nature of the lungs’ diseases, listed in Table 1, Yupingfeng San is an ancient herbal medicine in TCM and used to protect lung Qi and avoid pathogenic Qi.

In this medicine, there are three herbs: Astragalus, Fangfeng and Atractylodes. Astragalus can improve lung Qi and can reduce phlegm. Fangfeng can relieve the pathogenic Qi, remove dampness and relieve pain. Atractylodes enhances the spleen Qi, which can affect our digestion and absorption.

Can stem cells repair lung fibrosis?

Abstract – Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is a chronic and relentlessly progressive interstitial lung disease in which the accumulation of fibroblasts and extracellular matrix (ECM) induces the destruction of normal alveolar structures, ultimately leading to respiratory failure.

  1. Patients with advanced PF are unable to perform physical labor and often have concomitant cough and dyspnea, which markedly impair their quality of life.
  2. However, there is a paucity of available pharmacological therapies, and to date, lung transplantation remains the only possible treatment for patients suffering from end-stage PF; moreover, the complexity of transplantation surgery and the paucity of donors greatly restrict the application of this treatment.

Therefore, there is a pressing need for alternative therapeutic strategies for this complex disease. Due to their capacity for pluripotency and paracrine actions, stem cells are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of interstitial lung disease, and an extensive body of literature supports the therapeutic efficacy of stem cells in lung fibrosis.

  1. Although stem cell transplantation may play an important role in the treatment of PF, some key issues, such as safety and therapeutic efficacy, remain to be resolved.
  2. In this review, we summarize recent preclinical and clinical studies on the stem cell-mediated regeneration of fibrotic lungs and present an analysis of concerning issues related to stem cell therapy to guide therapeutic development for this complex disease.

Keywords: Cell therapy; Exosomes; Extracellular vesicles; Pulmonary fibrosis; Stem cells. © 2022. The Author(s).

Can you stop the progression of pulmonary fibrosis?

Pulmonary Fibrosis Progression and Exacerbation Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive disease that naturally gets worse over time. This worsening is related to the amount of fibrosis (scarring) in the lungs. As this occurs, a person’s breathing becomes more difficult, eventually resulting in shortness of breath, even at rest.