Nursing Diagnosis Abdominal Pain

0 Comments

Nursing Diagnosis Abdominal Pain

What is the Nanda nursing diagnosis for pain?

Diagnoses – Commonly used NANDA-I nursing diagnoses for pain include Acute Pain (duration less than 3 months) and Chronic Pain, See Table 11.5 for more information regarding these diagnoses. For more information about defining characteristics and related factors for other NANDA-I nursing diagnoses, refer to a current nursing diagnosis resource. Table 11.5 Pain NANDA-I Nursing Diagnoses

NANDA-I Diagnosis Definition Defining Characteristics
Acute Pain Unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with acute or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage; sudden or slow onset of any intensity from mild to severe with an anticipated or predictable end, and with a duration of less than 3 months.

Alteration in sleep pattern Appetite change Change in physiological parameters (i.e., blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate) Diaphoresis Distraction behavior Evidence of pain using standardized pain behavior checklist for those unable to communicate verbally Expressive behavior Facial expression of pain Guarding behavior Hopelessness Narrowed focus Protective behavior Proxy report of pain behavior/activity changes Pupil dilation Restlessness Self-focused Self-report of intensity using standardized pain scale Self-report of pain characteristics using standardized pain instrument

Chronic Pain Unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage (International Association for the Study of Pain); sudden or slow onset of any intensity from mild to severe, constant or recurring without anticipated or predictable end, and with a duration of greater than 3 months.

Alteration in ability to continue previous activities Alteration in sleep pattern Anorexia Evidence of pain using standardized pain behavior checklist for those unable to communicate verbally Facial expression of pain Proxy report of pain behavior/activity changes Self-focused Self-report of intensity using standardized pain scale Self-report of pain characteristics using standardized pain instrument

What is the diagnosis of lower abdominal pain?

Lower abdominal pain is most likely to be related to gastrointestinal diseases. It could also be related to your ureters, ovaries or uterus. Abdominal causes include: Irritable bowel syndrome.

What are the 5 differential diagnosis of abdominal pain?

AAA, abdominal aortic aneurysm; DKA, diabetic ketoacidosis; IBD, inflammatory bowel disease; IBS, irritable bowel syndrome; PID, pelvic inflammatory disease; PUD, peptic ulcer disease.

What is the most common diagnosis for acute abdominal pain?

Abdominal pain has many potential causes. The most common causes — such as gas pains, indigestion or a pulled muscle — usually aren’t serious. Other conditions may require urgent medical attention. While the location and pattern of abdominal pain can provide important clues, its time course is particularly useful when determining its cause.

Is acute abdominal pain a diagnosis?

Enhancing Healthcare Team Outcomes – Acute abdominal pain frequently poses a diagnostic dilemma. These patients may exhibit non-specific signs and symptoms such as vomiting, nausea, and leukocytosis. The cause of acute abdominal pain may be due to a myriad of diagnosis including gynecological, obstetrical, gastrointestinal, urological, metabolic and vascular etiologies.

While the physical exam may reveal that the patient has a surgical abdomen, the cause is difficult to know without proper imaging studies. An Interprofessional Approach and Outcomes While the general surgeon is almost always involved in the care of patients with an acute abdomen, it is important to consult with an interprofessional team of specialists that include an obstetrician, gynecologist, and a vascular surgeon.

The nurses are also a vital member of the interprofessional group as they will monitor the patient’s vital signs. In the postoperative period for pain, wound infection and ileus; the pharmacist will ensure that the patient is on the right analgesics, antiemetics, and appropriate antibiotics.

You might be interested:  How To Cure Varicose Veins With The Help Of Tomato

The radiologist also plays a vital role in determining the cause. Without providing a proper history, the radiologist may not be sure what to look for or what additional radiologic exams may be needed. This problem gets even more complex when women of childbearing age present with an acute abdomen. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria® are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical disorders that are reviewed by an interprofessional expert committee every three years.

The current guidelines have been developed after an exhaustive review of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals to determine the appropriateness of radiological imaging and treatment procedures by the committee. In cases where evidence is not definitive or minimal, expert opinion from the specialist may be utilized to recommend the type of imaging or treatment.

How to make NANDA nursing diagnosis?

Nursing diagnoses must include the problem and its definition, the etiology of the problem, and the defining characteristics or risk factors of the problem. The problem statement explains the patient’s current health problem and the nursing interventions needed to care for the patient.

What causes lower abdominal pains?

Home treatments – Bloating and lower abdominal pain due to digestion issues or menstruation will typically resolve with time. You can do some things at home that may help relieve bloating and lower abdominal pain due to certain causes:

Exercising can release air and gas that’s built up in the stomach. Increasing your fluid intake can reduce constipation. Taking OTC acid-reducing medications can treat heartburn or acid reflux. Taking mild OTC pain relievers, such as ibuprofen, may lessen abdominal pain.

Certain foods and drinks can contribute to abdominal bloating and lower abdominal pain. Avoiding one or more of these may help prevent these symptoms.

beansbeerBrussels sproutscabbagecarbonated beverageschewing gum dairy products if you’re lactose intolerant hard candyhigh-fat foods lentils turnips

Smoking can also increase symptoms. If you quit, you’ll not only reduce these symptoms but also help your overall health. Increasing your fiber intake by eating more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains may help prevent constipation.

What are 6 causes of abdominal pain?

Stomach pain; Pain – abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache Abdominal pain is pain that you feel anywhere between your chest and groin. This is often referred to as the stomach region or belly. You know that awful feeling: you’re nauseous; your stomach feels like it’s tied in a knot, and you don’t even want to move. What does your pain mean? Well, let’s talk today about abdominal pain. So, what causes abdominal pain? Almost everyone has pain in their belly at one time or another.

Most of the time, a serious medical problem is not the cause, and how bad your pain is doesn’t always reflect the seriousness of the problem causing your pain. You may feel very bad pain if you are having gas or stomach cramps due to viral gastroenteritis, better known as a stomach virus. And some life-threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or a very early case of appendicitis, may cause only mild pain, or no pain at all.

The important thing to know about abdominal pain is when you need immediate medical care. Less serious causes of abdominal pain include constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, food allergies, lactose intolerance, food poisoning, and a stomach virus. Other, more serious, causes include appendicitis, an abdominal aortic aneurysm, a bowel blockage, cancer, and gastroesophageal reflux.

  • Sometimes, you may have abdominal pain from a problem that isn’t in your belly, like a heart attack, menstrual cramps, or pneumonia.
  • So, what do you do about abdominal pain? Well, if you have mild abdominal pain, here are some helpful tips; Try sipping water or other clear fluids.
  • Avoid solid food for the first few hours.
You might be interested:  Electric Heat Pad For Back Pain

If you’ve been vomiting, wait 6 hours and then eat small amounts of mild foods like rice, applesauce, or crackers. If your pain is high in your abdomen and occurs after meals, antacids may help, especially if you are feeling heartburn or indigestion. You should seek medical attention if you have abdominal pain and are being treated for cancer, you can’t pass any stool, you’re vomiting blood, or you have chest, neck, or shoulder pain. There are three body views (front, back, and side) that can help you to identify a specific body area. The labels show areas of the body which are identified either by anatomical or by common names. For example, the back of the knee is called the “popliteal fossa,” while the “flank” is an area on the side of the body. The process of digesting food is accomplished by many organs in the body. Food is pushed by the esophagus into the stomach. The stomach mixes the food and begins the breakdown of proteins. The stomach propels the food then into the small intestine. The small intestine further digests food and begins the absorption of nutrients. Since the abdominal area contains many different organs it is divided in smaller areas. One division method, uses one median sagittal plane and one transverse plane that passes through the umbilicus at right angles. This method divides the abdomen into four quadrants. Medical personnel can easily refer to these quadrants when describing pain or injury regarding a victim. The appendix is a small finger-shaped tube that branches off the first part of the large intestine. The appendix can become inflamed or infected causing pain in the lower right part of the abdomen. Blood from the aorta reaches the kidneys so it can be filtered and cleaned. Among other functions, the kidneys remove toxins, metabolic waste, and excess ions from the blood which leaves the body in the form of urine. You know that awful feeling: you’re nauseous; your stomach feels like it’s tied in a knot, and you don’t even want to move.

  • What does your pain mean? Well, let’s talk today about abdominal pain.
  • So, what causes abdominal pain? Almost everyone has pain in their belly at one time or another.
  • Most of the time, a serious medical problem is not the cause, and how bad your pain is doesn’t always reflect the seriousness of the problem causing your pain.

You may feel very bad pain if you are having gas or stomach cramps due to viral gastroenteritis, better known as a stomach virus. And some life-threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or a very early case of appendicitis, may cause only mild pain, or no pain at all.

  1. The important thing to know about abdominal pain is when you need immediate medical care.
  2. Less serious causes of abdominal pain include constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, food allergies, lactose intolerance, food poisoning, and a stomach virus.
  3. Other, more serious, causes include appendicitis, an abdominal aortic aneurysm, a bowel blockage, cancer, and gastroesophageal reflux.

Sometimes, you may have abdominal pain from a problem that isn’t in your belly, like a heart attack, menstrual cramps, or pneumonia. So, what do you do about abdominal pain? Well, if you have mild abdominal pain, here are some helpful tips; Try sipping water or other clear fluids.

  • Avoid solid food for the first few hours.
  • If you’ve been vomiting, wait 6 hours and then eat small amounts of mild foods like rice, applesauce, or crackers.
  • If your pain is high in your abdomen and occurs after meals, antacids may help, especially if you are feeling heartburn or indigestion.
  • You should seek medical attention if you have abdominal pain and are being treated for cancer, you can’t pass any stool, you’re vomiting blood, or you have chest, neck, or shoulder pain.
You might be interested:  How To Cure Tomato Flu

Call your doctor if you have abdominal pain that lasts 1 week or longer, if your pain doesn’t improve in 24 to 48 hours, if bloating lasts more than 2 days, or if you have diarrhea for more than 5 days.

What is a nursing diagnosis as evidenced by?

The Nursing Process – You can’t discuss a nursing diagnosis without discussing the nursing process. The nursing process has five steps:

  1. Assessment is a thorough and holistic evaluation of a patient. It includes the collection of both subjective and objective patient data such as vital signs, a health history, head-to-toe physical, and a psychological, socioeconomic, and spiritual evaluation.
  2. Diagnosis is formed by the nurse and is based on the data collected during the assessment. The nursing diagnosis directs nursing-specific patient care. In this step, the nurse forms a diagnosis based on the patient’s specific medical and/or social needs. The diagnosis leads to the creation of goals with measurable outcomes. The diagnosis must be one that has been approved by NANDA International (NANDA-I), formerly known as North American Nursing Diagnosis Association. NANDA-I is responsible for developing and standardizing nursing diagnoses. Used internationally, the NANDA-I vision and mission is to use evidence-based, universal nursing terminology to promote safe patient care. NANDA-I defines a nursing diagnosis as follows:
    • “a clinical judgment concerning a human response to health conditions/life processes, or a vulnerability for that response, by an individual, family, group or community. A nursing diagnosis provides the basis for selection of nursing interventions to achieve outcomes for which the nurse has accountability.”
    • A nursing diagnosis generally has three components: a diagnosis approved by NANDA-I, a related to statement which defines the cause of the NANDA-I diagnosis, and an as evidenced by statement that uses specific patient data to provide a reason for the NANDA-I diagnosis and related to statement.
    • Risk-related diagnoses only contain a NANDA-I diagnosis and an as evidenced by statement because it is describing a vulnerability, not a cause. For example, a nurse may use a nursing diagnosis such as “risk for pressure ulcer as evidenced by lack of movement, poor nutrition, and hydration.”
  3. Outcome and planning involves developing a patient care plan based on the nursing diagnosis. Planning should be measurable and goal-oriented for the patient and/or their family members.
  4. Implementation is when nurses initiate the care plan and put it into action. This step provides the continuation of care during hospitalization until discharge.
  5. Evaluation is the final step of the nursing process. A patient care plan is evaluated based on specific goals and desired outcomes and may be adjusted based on the patient’s needs.

What is the most common diagnosis for acute abdominal pain?

Abdominal pain has many potential causes. The most common causes — such as gas pains, indigestion or a pulled muscle — usually aren’t serious. Other conditions may require urgent medical attention. While the location and pattern of abdominal pain can provide important clues, its time course is particularly useful when determining its cause.

What are the diagnoses of acute abdomen?

Pearls and Other Issues – Acute abdomen is a condition that demands urgent attention and treatment. The acute abdomen may be caused by an infection, inflammation, vascular occlusion, or obstruction. The patient will usually present with sudden onset of abdominal pain with associated nausea or vomiting.

Most patients with an acute abdomen appear ill. The history and physical exam serve to eliminate some diagnoses and suggest others. Acute care physicians are well aware of the modes of presentation of these disease entities. An acute abdomen may present in an obvious or subtle manner, but must always be recognized.

Rapid, appropriate testing and concomitant resuscitative therapy are mandatory. If the condition is even possibly surgical, early consultation with a surgeon is mandatory