Pain In Right Side Of Throat

0 Comments

Pain In Right Side Of Throat
A sore throat is a common reason to see a doctor. However, when a throat is sore on only one side, it may be a sign of a different illness or condition such as swollen lymph nodes or tonsillitis. In this article, we look at nine possible causes of a sore throat on one side. We also discuss when to see a doctor. Share on Pinterest Some illnesses and conditions cause soreness on only one side of the throat. The body’s lymph nodes act as filters, helping to identify and trap germs, such as viruses and bacteria, before they can infect other areas. As they do this, the lymph nodes may swell up and become sore.

a cold or flu strep throat an ear infectionan infected tooth, or tooth abscess mononucleosis, sometimes called “mono”infections in the skin cancer HIV

Many common viral illnesses, such as a cold or flu, can cause a sore throat. In these cases, the throat may only be sore on one side. When the nose is congested, mucus and fluid drain down the back of the throat. This is known as postnasal drip. Continual drainage can irritate the throat, leading to a feeling of soreness or scratchiness.

A specific part of the throat may become more irritated by drainage. It may feel like one side is raw and inflamed. Antibiotics cannot treat or weaken viral illnesses. If a cold, flu, or another viral illness is causing the sore throat, treatment will likely involve rest and fluids. Tonsillitis describes inflammation of one or more tonsil.

The tonsils are located at the back of the throat, and a virus or bacterium usually causes the infection and inflammation. An infection in just one tonsil can cause pain on one side. It may also cause a fever, trouble swallowing, and noisy breathing. Bacterial tonsillitis usually resolves with antibiotic treatment.

  1. An abscess is a contained, pus-filled lump within tissue.
  2. It is usually caused by a bacterial infection.
  3. A peritonsillar abscess forms in the tissues near the tonsils, usually when tonsillitis becomes severe or is left untreated.
  4. It may cause intense pain on one side of the throat.
  5. It may also cause fever, swollen lymph nodes, and trouble swallowing.

A person with a peritonsillar abscess requires urgent medical care. In severe cases, it can interfere with breathing. The abscess may need to be drained by a doctor. Antibiotics are also used to treat the underlying infection. Many things can injure the back of the mouth or throat, including:

burns from hot food or liquidfood with sharp edges, such as chips or crackersendotracheal intubation, which is the insertion of a tube down the throat to help with breathing

If one side of the throat is sore from being scraped or burned, gargling with warm salt water may help to soothe symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux disease ( GERD ) is a condition that causes the stomach’s contents, including stomach acid, to back up into the food pipe and throat.

pain or burning in the middle of the chestthe feeling of a lump or object in the throathoarsenessa dry coughburning in the mouth

If GERD goes untreated for too long, it can damage the food pipe and throat. The condition is treatable with medications and lifestyle changes. As the name implies, this viral illness usually causes sores to form on the hands, feet, and mouth. Sores can develop in the back of the mouth, near the sides of the throat, and one side may be more affected than the other.

  • Hand, foot, and mouth disease usually occurs in children under 5 years of age, but it can also spread to older children and adults.
  • The recommended treatment usually comprises rest, fluids, and over-the-counter medication for pain relief.
  • However, the disease can cause dehydration, especially in young children.

A person should see a doctor if they are unable to drink. Share on Pinterest Vocal therapy and resting the voice may help to treat vocal cord lesions. Overusing or misusing the voice can lead to lesions or sores on the vocal cords. A lesion may form on one side, causing one area of the throat to be sore.

A person with a vocal cord lesion will usually notice a change in their voice, such as hoarseness. These types of lesions are usually treatable. Resting the voice and vocal therapy are typically used to correct vocal cord lesions. In some cases, lesions will require surgery. While they are among the least common causes of a sore throat, tumors can affect the throat and surrounding areas.

They may be benign or cancerous. A tumor can cause soreness on one side of the throat. It may be located in the back of the throat or tongue, or in the larynx, which is commonly known as the voice box. Usually, a tumor will also lead to symptoms that do not occur with common infections and illnesses.

a lump in the necka hoarse voicenoisy breathingunexplained weight lossblood in the saliva or bloody phlegman ongoing cough

If a throat is sore on one side, the cause is usually a minor viral infection, such as the common cold. However, it is important to see a doctor if the following symptoms also appear:

You might be interested:  Cold Cure Tablets

an inability to eat or drink because of the sore throata severe sore throat that lasts for more than 7 days swollen lymph nodes that get bigger as the sore throat feels betterdifficulty breathing, or a feeling of the throat closingtrouble swallowinga fever pus in the back of the throatbody aches or joint painan earachea rashblood in the mouthcoughing up blooda lump in the necka sore throat that goes away and comes backhoarseness that lasts for more than 2 weeks

Read the article in Spanish

What helps a sore right side of your throat?

Mouth, throat, or esophageal cancer – These types of cancer can cause pain when you swallow. You may have an earache or a lump in your neck if you have throat cancer causing one-sided pain. Mouth cancer can cause painful swallowing as well as pain in your jaw and sores or lumps in your mouth.

  • Reflux. Reflux-related conditions may be treated with over-the-counter medications to decrease acid in your stomach as well as dietary and other lifestyle changes.
  • Postnasal drip. Postnasal drip may require different treatments depending on the cause. Keeping hydrated may help as well as taking allergy medications or decongestants.
  • Swollen lymph nodes. Swollen lymph nodes may go away as your body fights off a virus and infection, or you may need prescription medications. Apply a warm compress or take an over-the-counter pain reliever to reduce painful symptoms.
  • Laryngitis. Laryngitis could go away on its own but may require medications like antibiotics or steroids. Keeping your throat moist with a humidifier or by drinking water may help.
  • Tonsillitis. Tonsillitis may be soothed by gargling salt water, using a humidifier, and taking over-the-counter pain relievers. You may need antibiotics if the cause is bacterial.
  • Abscessed or impacted tooth. Abscessed teeth will need to be treated by a dentist and may result in a root canal. Your dentist may recommend surgically removing your impacted wisdom teeth.
  • Canker sore. Canker sores will usually go away on their own, but you may find relief with mouth rinses, as well as topical or oral medications.
  • Epiglottitis. Epiglottitis treatment will focus on opening up your airways and treating any infections with antibiotics.
  • Glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia may be treated with prescription medications, a nerve block, or even surgery.
  • Mouth, throat, or esophageal cancer. Cancer treatment can include surgery, medications, chemotherapy, and radiation.

You should always seek a doctor if you experience life-threatening symptoms such as:

  • difficulty breathing
  • difficulty swallowing
  • faintness (lightheadedness)
  • high fever, which is when a child or an adult has a temperature that exceeds 100.4°F (38°C)

See a doctor for less severe symptoms if they don’t clear up in the expected amount of time or if they get worse. Ignoring symptoms may lead to more significant health concerns, so don’t delay a diagnosis. A doctor will:

  • discuss your symptoms
  • perform a physical exam
  • order any tests necessary to diagnose the condition

Several conditions may contribute to pain on one side of your throat when swallowing. Consider your other symptoms to determine what might be causing the swallowing discomfort. Some conditions may require immediate medical care, while others may be treated with home-based remedies and rest. Talk to a doctor if you have any concerns about your symptoms.

Why do I have a weird pain in my throat?

Causes of Throat Pain – There are many possible causes throat pain. Some include viral infections, bacterial infections, sinus infections, allergies, acid reflux, exposure to irritants, laryngitis, medical procedures, and throat cancer.

Why wont my sore throat on my right side go away?

“The ‘run of the mill’ strep throat and tonsillitis are more often seen by primary care physicians,” says Dr. Flores. “ENTs see the more complicated cases that don’t respond to standard treatment. Many of these people have infectious mononucleosis, or eventually need tonsillectomies.” In addition, Flores notes that persistent throat pain on one side — or that feels worse on one side — may indicate a bacterial infection that usually begins as a complication of tonsillitis or untreated strep throat (peritonsillar abscess).

When I swallow one side of my throat and ear hurts?

Frequently Asked Questions –

What causes throat and ear pain on one side? Infections like the common cold, strep throat, mono, sinus infections, tooth infections, allergies, TMJ, and acid reflux can all cause pain in the throat and ear. Usually, you’ll have throat and ear pain on both sides. However, some causes are more likely than others to lead to one-sided ear and throat pain. For example, if one of your tonsils is more irritated than the other, you might feel discomfort mostly on that side. It’s also possible to get an ear infection in one ear but not the other. Conditions like TMJ can cause pain on both sides or just one side. What are home remedies for throat and ear pain when swallowing? Eat soft, cold foods that are easy to chew and swallow, drink plenty of cool fluids, and take OTC pain relievers such as acetaminophen for about 30 to 60 minutes before eating and drinking. What can help ease a sore throat and ear pain? OTC pain relievers like Tylenol (acetaminophen) and Advil or Motrin (ibuprofen) can help relieve your symptoms. Cough drops can soothe the back of the throat, as can cold foods and fluids. You can also apply heating pads or ice packs on your neck or near your affected ear. Keeping your upper body elevated if you have acid reflux can help prevent acid from coming up the esophagus into the back of your throat. This position can also encourage the auditory tube to drain if it is clogged with mucus or debris.

You might be interested:  Jaw Pain Icd 10

Why is one of my throat sore?

A sore throat is pain, scratchiness or irritation of the throat that often worsens when you swallow. The most common cause of a sore throat (pharyngitis) is a viral infection, such as a cold or the flu. A sore throat caused by a virus resolves on its own.

Pain or a scratchy sensation in the throat Pain that worsens with swallowing or talking Difficulty swallowing Sore, swollen glands in your neck or jaw Swollen, red tonsils White patches or pus on your tonsils A hoarse or muffled voice

How do I know if my throat pain is serious?

What can I expect if I have a sore throat? – Most of the time, a sore throat isn’t a serious medical issue. Most sore throats go away within a few days. You should contact a healthcare provider if your sore throat lasts longer than a few days or if you have a sore throat and the following issues:

Severe throat pain. Trouble breathing or swallowing. A fever, especially if it’s over 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius). A visible bulge in the back of your throat. Blood in your saliva or phlegm. Extreme tiredness. Rash anywhere on your body.

Which throat pain is serious?

Suffering from a sore throat? Is it painful to swallow? Or is your throat scratchy? A virus may be causing your sore throat. Most sore throats, except for strep throat, do not need antibiotics. Causes of sore throat include:

Viruses, like those that cause or The bacteria group A strep, which causes strep throat (also called streptococcal pharyngitis) Allergies Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke

Of these, infections from viruses are the most common cause of sore throats. Strep throat is an infection in the throat and tonsils caused by bacteria. These bacteria are called group A Streptococcus (also called Streptococcus pyogenes ). A sore throat can make it painful to swallow.

Cough Runny nose Hoarseness (changes in your voice that makes it sound breathy, raspy, or strained) Conjunctivitis (also called )

In general, strep throat is a mild disease, but it can be very painful. Common symptoms may include:

Fever Pain when swallowing Sore throat that can start very quickly and may look red Red and swollen tonsils White patches or streaks of pus on the tonsils Tiny, red spots on the roof of the mouth, called petechiae Swollen lymph nodes in the front of the neck

The following symptoms suggest a virus is causing the illness instead of strep throat:

Cough Runny nose Hoarseness (changes in your voice that makes it sound breathy, raspy, or strained) Conjunctivitis (also called )

Talk to your doctor if you or your child have symptoms of sore throat. They may need to test you or your child for strep throat. Also see a doctor if you or your child have any of the following:

Difficulty breathing Difficulty swallowing Blood in saliva or phlegm Excessive drooling (in young children) Dehydration

Joint swelling and pain Rash

This list is not all-inclusive. Please see your doctor for any symptom that is severe or concerning. See a doctor if symptoms do not improve within a few days or get worse. Tell your doctor if you or your child have recurrent sore throats. A doctor will determine what type of illness you have by asking about symptoms and doing a physical examination.

  • Sometimes they will also swab your throat.
  • Since bacteria cause strep throat, antibiotics are needed to treat the infection and prevent rheumatic fever and other complications.
  • A doctor cannot tell if someone has strep throat just by looking in the throat.
  • If your doctor thinks you might have strep throat, they can test you to determine if it is causing your illness.
You might be interested:  Piles Cure Homeopathic Medicine

Anyone with strep throat should stay home from work, school, or daycare until they no longer have fever AND have taken antibiotics for at least 12 hours. If a virus causes a sore throat, antibiotics will not help. Most sore throats will get better on their own within one week.

  1. Your doctor may prescribe other medicine or give you tips to help you feel better.
  2. When antibiotics aren’t needed, they won’t help you, and their side effects could still cause harm.
  3. Side effects can range from mild reactions, like a rash, to more serious health problems.
  4. These problems can include severe allergic reactions, and infection.C.

diff causes diarrhea that can lead to severe colon damage and death.

Should I be worried if it hurts to swallow?

When to Contact a Medical Professional – Contact your health care provider if you have painful swallowing and:

Blood in your stools or your stools appear black or tarryShortness of breath or lightheadednessWeight loss

Tell your provider about any other symptoms that occur with the painful swallowing, including:

Abdominal painChillsCoughFeverHeartburnNausea or vomitingSour taste in the mouthWheezing

Does coronavirus hurt your throat when you swallow?

Some people describe COVID sore throat as the most painful sore throat they’ve ever experienced. Others report a sore throat that isn’t too different from one caused by a regular cold. Other COVID sore throat symptoms people notice include: Pain when swallowing or talking.

Should I go to the doctor if my throat hurts when I swallow?

Seeing a physician – In most cases, your sore throat will improve with at-home treatment. However, it’s time to see your doctor if a severe sore throat and a fever over 101 degrees lasts longer than one to two days; you have difficulty sleeping because your throat is blocked by swollen tonsils or adenoids; or a red rash appears.

If you have any of the symptoms listed above, it could mean that you have a bacterial infection. In that case, your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic to treat your infection. “For adults who have repeated bacterial throat infections within a relatively short period of time, a physician may recommend a tonsillectomy,” says Dr.

Scotch. Your doctor may recommend a tonsillectomy (the surgical removal of the tonsils) if:

Abscesses of the tonsils do not respond to drainage. There is a persistent foul odor or taste in the mouth that does not respond to antibiotics. A biopsy is needed to evaluate a suspected tumor of the tonsil.

“However, a tonsillectomy should always be the last resort for treating sore throats,” warns Dr. Scotch. “The best treatment for a sore throat is prevention.”

Why is one of my throat sore?

A sore throat is pain, scratchiness or irritation of the throat that often worsens when you swallow. The most common cause of a sore throat (pharyngitis) is a viral infection, such as a cold or the flu. A sore throat caused by a virus resolves on its own.

Pain or a scratchy sensation in the throat Pain that worsens with swallowing or talking Difficulty swallowing Sore, swollen glands in your neck or jaw Swollen, red tonsils White patches or pus on your tonsils A hoarse or muffled voice

When I swallow one side of my throat and ear hurts?

Frequently Asked Questions –

What causes throat and ear pain on one side? Infections like the common cold, strep throat, mono, sinus infections, tooth infections, allergies, TMJ, and acid reflux can all cause pain in the throat and ear. Usually, you’ll have throat and ear pain on both sides. However, some causes are more likely than others to lead to one-sided ear and throat pain. For example, if one of your tonsils is more irritated than the other, you might feel discomfort mostly on that side. It’s also possible to get an ear infection in one ear but not the other. Conditions like TMJ can cause pain on both sides or just one side. What are home remedies for throat and ear pain when swallowing? Eat soft, cold foods that are easy to chew and swallow, drink plenty of cool fluids, and take OTC pain relievers such as acetaminophen for about 30 to 60 minutes before eating and drinking. What can help ease a sore throat and ear pain? OTC pain relievers like Tylenol (acetaminophen) and Advil or Motrin (ibuprofen) can help relieve your symptoms. Cough drops can soothe the back of the throat, as can cold foods and fluids. You can also apply heating pads or ice packs on your neck or near your affected ear. Keeping your upper body elevated if you have acid reflux can help prevent acid from coming up the esophagus into the back of your throat. This position can also encourage the auditory tube to drain if it is clogged with mucus or debris.