Podophyllum Is Used To Treat Which Disease

0 Comments

Podophyllum Is Used To Treat Which Disease
Abstract – Podophyllin is a cytotoxic material extracted from Podophyllum peltatum and Podophyllum hexandrum and is widely used for the treatment of genital warts. This article reviews the chemistry of podophyllin and its active components along with the mechanism of action in various dermatoses.

  1. Furthermore, the documented uses of podophyllin in various dermatological disorders have been described along with the side effects of the drug.
  2. Based on the available literature, a clinical guideline is being proposed so as to minimize the side effects.
  3. Further studies should be carried out on its use in a lower concentration in other dermatoses, especially premalignant and malignant skin diseases.

Keywords: Cutaneous malignancies, genital warts, Podophyllin resin, podophyllotoxin

Can I use Podophyllum everyday?

Drug information provided by: Merative, Micromedex ® Podophyllum is a poison. Keep it away from the mouth because it is harmful if swallowed. Also, keep podophyllum away from the eyes and other mucous membranes, such as the inside of the nose, mouth, or vagina.

  1. This medicine may cause severe irritation.
  2. If you get some in your eyes, immediately flush the eyes with water for 15 minutes.
  3. If you get some on your normal skin, thoroughly wash the skin with soap and water to remove the medicine.
  4. However, if this medicine contains tincture of benzoin, it may be removed more easily from the skin by swabbing with rubbing alcohol.

This medicine may contain alcohol and therefore may be flammable. Do not use near heat, near open flame, or while smoking. Use podophyllum only as directed. Do not use more of it, do not use it more often, and do not use it for a longer time than your doctor ordered.

To do so may increase the chance of too much medicine being absorbed into the body and the chance of side effects. Do not use podophyllum on moles or birthmarks. To do so may cause severe irritation. Also, do not apply this medicine to crumbling or bleeding warts or to warts that have recently had surgery on them.

To do so may increase the chance of absorption through the skin. To use:

Podophyllum can cause severe irritation of normal skin. Therefore, apply petrolatum around the affected area before you apply podophyllum, and/or apply talcum powder to the treated area immediately after you apply podophyllum. This is to prevent the medicine from spreading to the normal skin. Use a toothpick or a cotton-tipped or glass applicator to apply this medicine. Apply 1 drop at a time, allowing time for drying between drops, until the affected area is covered. After podophyllum is applied, allow it to remain on the affected area for 1 to 6 hours as directed by your doctor. Then, remove the medicine by thoroughly washing the affected area with soap and water. If this medicine contains tincture of benzoin, it may be removed more easily by swabbing the affected area with rubbing alcohol. However, this may be more irritating than washing with soap and water. Immediately after applying this medicine, wash your hands to remove any medicine that may be on them.

What is Podophyllum 6 used for in homeopathy?

Information about Dr. Reckeweg Podophyllum Peltatum Dilution 6 CH – Dr. Reckeweg Podophyllinum Dilution is a homeopathic remedy that is made from the plant May apple. It helps in treating Gastro-enteritis and swelling in liver. This medicine is also useful for treating infections such as cholera and helps in reducing pain in uterus. Key Ingredients:

Podophyllinum

Key Benefits:

Colic pain in the stomach

Treats Gastro-enteritis with vomiting

Effective against ulceration and piles of intestines

Reduces pain in ovary

Directions For Use: The medicine should be consumed as prescribed by the physician.This medicine can be taken with other allopathic medicines too Safety Information:

Keep at least half an hour gap between food/drink/any other medicines and homeopathic medicine

Read the label carefully before use

Keep out of the reach of children

Use under medical supervision

Avoid any strong smell in the mouth while taking medicine such as coffee, hing, garlic, onion etc.

What are the benefits of Podophyllum?

Descriptions – Podophyllum is used to remove benign (not cancer) growths, such as certain kinds of warts. It works by destroying the tissue of the growth. A few hours after podophyllum is applied to a wart, the wart becomes blanched (loses all color). In 24 to 48 hours, the medicine causes death of the tissue.

  1. After about 72 hours, the wart begins to slough or come off and gradually disappears.
  2. Podophyllum is usually applied only in a doctor’s office because it is a poison and can cause serious side effects if not used properly.
  3. However, your doctor may ask you to apply this medicine at home.
  4. If you do apply it at home, be sure you understand exactly how to use it.

Podophyllum is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

Is Podophyllum an anticancer?

One of the most famous aryltetralin lignans, due to its anticancer potential, is podophyllotoxin (PTOX; C 22 H 22 O 8 ) (Fig.1),. PTOX also shows activity against cytomegalovirus and Sindbis virus and is effective in treating anogenital warts in children.

What is the medicinal importance of Podophyllum?

Abstract – Podophyllum hexandrum Royle is an important, endemic medicinal plant species of Himalaya. It is used in Unani System of Medicine under the name of ‘ Papra’, The drug was not mentioned in previous literatures, but the first time it introduced in Unani Medicine by a great scholar Hakim Najmul Ghani.

  1. He has mentioned its uses and benefits in his classical book Khazainul Advia,
  2. In Unani Medicine the plant species has been used to treat various ailments like constipation, fever, jaundice, liver disorders, syphilis, diseases of lymph glands etc.
  3. In Kashmir Himalaya it is used to treat various diseases by local medicinemen, but now it is listed in rare drugs.

Various pharmacological studies have been done such as antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, radio-protective etc., recently it has also been reported that podophyllotoxin or podophyllin can be used to treat some forms of cancers also.

Is Podophyllum 30 for liver?

Information about Dr. Reckeweg Podophyllum Peltatum Dilution 30 CH – Dr. Reckeweg Podophyllinum Dilution is a homeopathic remedy that is made from the plant May apple. It helps in treating Gastro-enteritis and swelling in liver. This medicine is also useful for treating infections such as cholera and helps in reducing pain in uterus. Key Ingredients:

Podophyllinum

Key Benefits:

Colic pain in the stomach

Treats Gastro-enteritis with vomiting

Effective against ulceration and piles of intestines

Reduces pain in ovary

Directions For Use: The medicine should be consumed as prescribed by the physician.This medicine can be taken with other allopathic medicines too Safety Information:

Keep at least half an hour gap between food/drink/any other medicines and homeopathic medicine

Read the label carefully before use

Keep out of the reach of children

Use under medical supervision

Avoid any strong smell in the mouth while taking medicine such as coffee, hing, garlic, onion etc.

Is Podophyllum a laxative?

Podophyllum peltatum (American mandrake) – The resin prepared from the dried rhizome and roots of Podophyllum peltatum contains podophyllotoxin, α-peltatin, and β-peltatin. When applied topically, it is a strong irritant to the skin and mucous membranes and can lead to poisoning because of systemic absorption.

When taken by mouth, it has a drastic laxative action and produces violent peristalsis. Ingestion of large doses can result in severe neuropathic toxicity, The oral and local use of the resin should be avoided during pregnancy, as this has been associated with teratogenicity and fetal death. • A 31-year-old man took an unknown amount of Podophyllum peltatum, thinking it to be Mandragora officinarum ; he developed severe nausea and vomiting and recovered uneventfully,

Read full chapter URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780444537171013093

What are the adverse effects of Podophyllum?

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medication? – Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

You might be interested:  Gout Cure Homeopathy Medicine

allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue muscle pain pain, tingling, numbness in the hands or feet stomach pain unusual bleeding or bruising

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

skin irritation at site of use

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What are the symptoms of Podophyllum?

Podophyllum peltatum – Podophyllum peltatum is one of the main medicines for acute diarrhea in children. The child has profuse, gushing diarrhea that is watery, green or yellow, and offensive. There is gurgling in the abdomen with passage of gas. Often the diarrhea is painless, although some cramping may occur prior to passing a stool.

Is podophyllin safe?

5) Fisher: Severe Systemic and Local Reactions to Topical Podophyllum Resins; Cutis, Volume 28, 1981. Podophyllin is a powerful caustic and severe irritant. Keep away from the eyes; if eye contact occurs, flush with copious amounts of warm water and consult physician or poison control center immediately for advice.

Is podophyllin toxic?

A Rare Case of Podophyllin Poisoning: Early Intervention is Lifesaving 1–4 Department of Pediatrics, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India Find articles by 1–4 Department of Pediatrics, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India Find articles by 1–4 Department of Pediatrics, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India Find articles by 1–4 Department of Pediatrics, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India Find articles by © 2020; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.

© The Author(s).2020 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and non-commercial reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver () applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Accidental poisoning in children is very common, making up 10.9% of all unintentional injuries worldwide. Africa has the highest incidence of fatal poisonings worldwide, at 4 per 100,000.

Poisoning with podophyllin is rare, with most cases documented around the 1970s to 1980s. Podophyllin is a resin mixture obtained from the dried Rhizome and roots of Podophyllin peltatum (North America) and Podopyllin emodi (India). Podophyllotoxin is the most toxic chemical present in the podophyllin, which is lipid soluble; so crosses the cell membrane easily and inhibits mitotic spindle formation.

Both topical application and oral consumption can cause podophyllin poisoning. Neurotoxicity is the most serious effect along with bone marrow depression, gastrointestinal irritation, and hepatic and renal dysfunction. Management of podophyllin toxicity is mainly symptomatic, and no specific antidote exists.

We report a case of a 2-year-old-year girl with accidental podophyllin poisoning, who presented with neurotoxicity followed by multiorgan dysfunction and then succumbed. Education of parents and healthcare workers on home safety still remains the mainstay of prevention. How to cite this article: Jain MK, Patnaik S, Rup AR, Gaurav A.

A Rare Case of Podophyllin Poisoning: Early Intervention is Lifesaving. Indian J Crit Care Med 2020;24(6):477–479. Keywords: Accidental poisoning, Multiorgan dysfunction, Neurotoxicity, Podophyllin Accidental poisoning in children is a common occurrence, making up to 10.9% of all unintentional injuries worldwide.

  1. Africa has the highest incidence of fatal poisonings worldwide, at 4 per 100,000.
  2. Poisoning with podophyllin is rare, with most cases documented around the 1970s to 1980s.
  3. The last known reported case in India was a pediatric patient in 2002 and a 3-year-old child in South Africa in 2015.
  4. A 2-year-old girl was admitted after accidental ingestion of 5 mL of podophyllin containing topical solution (Podowart 20%), originally prescribed for an adult for warts.

Mother had given podophyllin by mistake in place of albendazole syrup prescribed for worm infestation. She had presented to hospital 6 hours, post- ingestion with vomiting and altered sensorium. On examination, she was comatose (GCS—E2V2M4), febrile 102 F, tachycardia heart rate—140/minute with feeble peripheral pulses, a systolic blood pressure of 60 mm Hg, RR—50/minute, and a saturation of 85% in room air.

She was managed conservatively with gastric lavage with charcoal, fluid bolus, oxygen, and inotropes. But after 1 hour, she developed right focal seizures with secondary generalization, for which she was loaded with fosphenytoin and then levitiracetam. As the general condition of the child deteriorated, she was referred to our hospital.

On arrival at emergency, she was comatose with GCS—6/15 (E1V1M4), heart rate—140/minute with cold and calmy extremities with feeble pulses, blood pressure was not recordable, and saturation was 57% on room air. She was resuscitated with rapid fluid boluses, adrenaline infusion then intubated, and ventilated in pediatric intensive care unit.

At the time of admission, baby already developed multiorgan dysfunction, i.e., renal (anuria for 4 hours), hepatic (transaminitis), central nervous system (CNS) (altered sensorium, coma), cardiovascular (shock and severe metabolic acidosis) (PH —6.95, PCO 2 —59, PaO 2 —15, bicarbonate—12 and BE—19), and respiratory (severe hypoxia).

Central line and arterial line were placed and inotropes (adrenaline, noradrenaline, and vasopressin) are optimized. Peritoneal dialysis was started as there is anuria and severe metabolic acidosis ( and ). Serial arterial blood gas

Parameter Day 1 referral center Day 2 admission Day 2 Day 3 Day 4
PH 7.23 6.95 6.903 7.372 7.164
PCO 2 43 59 52 29. 50
PaO 2 221 15 22.4 72 39
HCO 3 − 17.8 12.5 7.7 18 15
BE −8 −19 −20 −9 −10
Na/K/Cl − 145/2.7/110 157/3/119 150/2.5/120 161/3.3/129 153/5.8/123
Anion gap 20 29.56 25 14 20
Lactate 12 12.2 6.2 5.4

Serial laboratory investigations

Investigations Normal value Day1 (at referral center) Day 2 (admission) Day 3 Day 4
Hemoglobin 11–14 g/dL 11.2 6.8 13.1 10.7
TLC 5,000–15,000/μL 11,900 3,100 2,700 1,900
DC N—40–60, L—35–65 N—18, L—71 N—26, L—71 N—35, L—56 N—71, L—20
TPC 1.5–4.5 L 1.9 L 50,000 30,000 20,000
CRP (Q) 6 mg/L 18.4 150
Electrolytes (Na/K/Ca) 153/3/4 151/2.0/3.9 159/2.5/6.4 152/5.8/7
Urea 12–42 mg/dL 19 29 61 84
Creatinine 0.5–1.0 mg/dL 0.5 0.5 1.3 2.5
S. bilirubin 02–1.2 mg/dL 23 0.1 0.55 1.48
SGOT 0–40 U/L 258 646 1,013 750
SGPT 5–50 U/L 88 204 270 256
ALP 239 117 203 131
Albumin 3.5–5 g/dL 2.5 1 2.3 2
PT/INR 10–15/seconds 20/1.3 46/4.7 35/3.5 32.4/3.24
GCS E3V4M5 E2VTM3 E1 VT M 1 E1VTM1

Her initial laboratory investigations revealed Hb—6.8 g/dL, TLC—3,100 (N—26, L 71%), TPC—50,000, Na—151, potassium—2.8, calcium—3.9, urea—29, creatinine—0.5, SGOT—646, SGPT—206, and prothombin time—46 second with an INR of 4.7. She had received one unit of PRBC.

  • Child also received one unit of FFP and one unit of RDP along with vitamin K as there is oozing from central and arterial line site and through the endotracheal tube.
  • Within next 48 hours, her general condition further deteriorated and she was succumbed.
  • We lost this child because of delayed referral, delay in intubation at referral center, and probably aspiration during transport leads to severe hypoxia.

Podophyllin is a resin mixture obtained from the dried rhizome and roots of Podophyllin peltatum (North America) and Podopyllin emodi (India). This resin contains at least 16 chemicals including podophyllotoxin, alpha and beta peltatin, desoxypodophyllotoxin, and quercetin.

Of these, the toxic agent is thought to be podophyllotoxin, a lipid soluble compound that crosses cell membranes with ease. This substance and its derivatives have a colchicine-like effect, arresting the mitotic spindle. Neurotoxicity may be related to its in vitro ability to bind microtubular protein and to inhibit axoplasmic flow.

Podophyllin has been used for external application in treatment of anogenital warts, condyloma accuminatum, and malignancy basal cell epitheliomas, wet and exudative types of eczema, and molluscum contagiosum. According to the CDC, podophyllum is no longer recommended as a treatment of external genital warts because of safer alternative options.

  • Podophyllin poisoning following both topical application and oral consumption has been reported in adults.
  • Fatal dose of podophyllin resin for humans has been estimated to be 0.3 g to 0.6 g, or as little as one-half teaspoon of 25% podophyllin resin in benzoin tincture.
  • There is a case report of podophyllin toxicity in a child aged 2 years in western literature.

There is only one case reported in child in the Indian literature in 2002; hence, we report this case of accidental consumption of podophyllin in a 2-year-old girl. Podophyllotoxin and its derivatives bind to the enzyme topoisomerase II during the late S and early G2 stage and arrests mitosis to produce its cytotoxic effects.

  1. Neurotoxicity, in addition, may be due to direct nonspecific effects on the neurons and glial cells.
  2. Multiorgan dysfunction after podophyllin ingestion manifests as bone marrow suppression (thrombocytopenia and leucopenia; early features), gastrointestinal irritation (in the form of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea), and renal and hepatic failure (electrolyte disturbances, including hypokalemia and hypoglycemia).

Neurotoxicity is the most severe effect of podophyllin poisoning. Central nervous system presentation varies from altered sensorium, confusion, hallucinations, stupor, seizures to coma, and ultimately death. Peripheral neuropathies usually appear late in the course of illness but can appear early with motor (hypotonia and hyporeflexia), sensory (paresthesia, glove and stocking loss of light touch, and proprioception), and autonomic deficits (paralytic ileus, hypotension, tachycardia, urinary retention and apnea).

  • The CNS toxicity is usually transient and reversible over a period of up to ten days, but deep coma leading to a fatal outcome or severe encephalopathy characterized by irreversible cognitive dysfunction, which may also occur.
  • The course of the neuropathy is chronic and the recovery is delayed sometimes improvement being minimal.

Management of podophyllin toxicity is mainly symptomatic, and no specific antidote exists. Activated charcoal is recommended for gastric lavage after recent ingestion. If topical contact occurs, wash with soap and water. Intensive management of ventilation and circulation, accompanied by monitoring for above-mentioned complications is required.

Hemoperfusion should be used for severe systemic poisoning since it has been shown to be effective in reducing the plasma fraction of podophyllum toxin and other active metabolites. The first fatal case after oral administration was reported in 1890. The last known reported case in India was a pediatric patient in India in 2002 and a 3-year-old child in South Africa in 2015.

, A fatal case relating to topical application was reported in 1954. Education of parents and healthcare workers on home safety still remains the mainstay of prevention. Most poisoning cases require supportive management, and poison control centers should be contacted early for management guidelines.

  1. Ideally, these types of toxic drugs should not be available over the counter without prescriptions.
  2. Though a rare entity and scarcely reported; physicians should be aware about podophyllin toxicity.
  3. Neurotoxicity is the most dangerous complication but it can present with multiorgan dysfunction also.
  4. Treatment is mainly symptomatic.

It can be fatal if not treated early. Parental awareness is very important to avoid this type of accidental toxicity. One should not forget to take help of poison control centres for management of this type of rare toxicity. Source of support: Nil Conflict of interest: None 1.

World Health Organization, United Nations Children’s Fund. World Report on Child Injury Prevention, 2008. Geneva:: World Health Organization Press,; 2008:. Chapter 6: Poisoning. pp.123-–138.2. Miller RA. Podophyllin. Int J Dermatol.1985;; 24 ((8):):491––497. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-4362.1985.tb05827.x. DOI: 3.

Filley CM, Radford NRG, Lacy JR, Heitner MA, Earnest MP. Neurologic manifestations of podophyllin toxicity. Neurology.1982;; 32 ((3):):308––311. doi: 10.1212/WNL.32.3.308. DOI: 4. Workowski KA, Bolan GA. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines 2015.

MMWR.2015;; 64: :1––137.5. Clark ANG, Parsonage MJ. A case of podophyllin poisoning with involvement of the nervous system. BMJ.1957;; 2 ((5054):):1155––1157. doi: 10.1136/bmj.2.5054.1155. DOI: 6. Claus EP. Pharmacognosy.4th ed., Philadelphia:: Lea and Febiger;; 1961. pp. pp.254––258.7. McGuigan M. Toxicology of topical therapy.

Clin Dermatol.1989;; 7 ((3):):32––37. doi: 10.1016/0738-081X(89)90005-9. DOI: 8. Kumar M, Shanmugham A, Prabha S, Adhisivam B, Narayanan P, Biswal N. Permanent neurological sequelae following accidental podophyllin ingestion. J Child Neurol.2012;; 27 ((2):):209––210.

doi: 10.1177/0883073811415682. DOI: 9. O’Mahony S, Keohane C, Jacobs J, O’Riordain D, Whelton M. Neuropathy due to podophyllin intoxication. J Neurol.1990;; 237 ((2):):110––112. doi: 10.1007/BF00314673. DOI: 10. Slater GE, Rumack BH, Peterson RG. Podophyllin poisoning: systemic toxicity following cutaneous application.

Obst Gynecol.1978;; 52 ((1):):94––96.11. Wit T, Bisseru T. Accidental podophyllin poisoning in a 3-year-old child. S Afr J CH.2015;; 9 ((2):):63––64.12. Rudrappa S, Vijaydeva L. Podophyllin poisoning. Indian Pediatr.2002;; 39 ((6):):598––599.13. Ward JW, Clifford WS, Monaco AR, Bickerstaff HJ.

What class of drug is Podophyllum?

This compound belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 9,9p-dihydroxyaryltetralin lignans.

What is another name for Podophyllum?

Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine.

What is the English name for Podophyllum?

Plant profile:

Family Podophyllaceae
Unani name
Hindi name Papra, Bankakri
English name Indian Podophyllum
Trade name Bankakri

What are the symptoms of Podophyllum 30?

Hot, flushed cheeks, offensive breath, at night, mouth and tongue dry on awaking indicates Podophyllum. Soreness of throat extending to ears, nausea and vomiting with fullness of head, rattling of mucus in throat. Bitter taste in the mouth with dryness of the throat. Soreness extending to the ears.

What is the homeopathic medicine for liver repair?

The liver is the largest gland in the body situated below the diaphragm, on the right side of the abdomen and has many vital functions to perform for the body. It filters the blood coming from the digestive tract before it passes to the body. Other important functions of the liver are metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and amino acids in the body; production of bile that help in breaking down the fat and detoxification of chemicals and drugs.

Its other functions include producing blood clotting factors, storage of glucose and clearance of bilirubin. Many factors can cause liver problems, but the major among them are virus infections, alcohol consumption and obesity. Liver problems can occur in persons of all age groups and may be genetic. Liver problems, if not treated in time, can lead to liver failure and prove life threatening.

Homeopathic Treatment Homeopathy is the science of healing which is very effective in treating both acute and chronic liver problems. Homeopathy takes a holistic approach to healing. Homeopathic medicines are deep acting and have no side effects on the body.

  1. Unlike the conventional mode of medicine, Homeopathic medicines do not suppress the disease and its symptoms.
  2. In fact, they attack the disorder at the root and set off the body’s own restorative processes, making it strong enough to completely eradicate the disease.
  3. Suppressing the disease process makes it stubborn.

Once the body’s own immune system is strengthened, it prevents further recurrence of the disease. Homeopathic Medicines for Liver Problems

Highly recommended Homeopathic medicines for liver problems are Chelidonium, Carduus Marianus and Natrum Sulphuricum. Chelidonium is a great remedy for liver infections. Hepatitis, gallstones and jaundice are treated well with Homeopathic medicine Chelidonium. Carduus Marianus has shown remarkable results in liver cirrhosis with dropsical conditions while Natrum Sulphuricum is the most valuable among Homeopathic medicines for liver problems like jaundice, hepatitis and other bilious complaints.Chelidonium, Arsenic Album and Phosphorus – Top Homeopathic medicines for liver problems such as hepatitis. Marianus and Phosphorus – Effective Homeopathic medicines for liver problems like cirrhosis.Picricum Acidum and Lachesis – Best Homeopathic medicines for liver problems such as a fatty liver.Chionanthus, Natrum Sulphuricum and Crotalus Horridus – Top rated Homeopathic medicines for liver problems such as jaundice.Berberis Vulgaris and Chionanthus – Popular Homeopathic medicines for liver problem such as gall stones. Disclaimer: This article is written by the Practitioner for informational purposes only. Users must not view the content as medical advice in any way. Users are also required to ‘NOT SELF MEDICATE’ and always consult a practicing specialist before taking any medicines or undergoing any treatment. Practo and the Practitioner will not be responsible for any act or omission by the User arising from the User’s interpretation of the content.

Can you use wart remover daily?

Proper Use – Drug information provided by: Merative, Micromedex ® Use this medicine only as directed by your doctor. Do not use more of it, do not use it more often, and do not use it for a longer time than recommended on the label, unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

  1. To do so may increase the chance of absorption through the skin and the chance of salicylic acid poisoning.
  2. This medicine is for use only on the skin.
  3. Do not get any of it in your eyes, nose, or mouth,
  4. Rinse it off with water right away if it does get on these areas.
  5. Before using an OTC acne product for the first time, apply a small amount to one or two small affected areas of the skin for 3 days.

If no discomfort occurs, follow the directions on the drug facts label of the product. If your doctor has ordered an occlusive dressing (airtight covering, such as kitchen plastic wrap) to be applied over this medicine, make sure you know how to apply it.

Since an occlusive dressing will increase the amount of medicine absorbed through your skin and the possibility of salicylic acid poisoning, use it only as directed. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor. Keep this medicine away from the eyes and other mucous membranes, such as the mouth and inside of the nose.

If you should accidentally get some in your eyes or on other mucous membranes, immediately flush them with water for 15 minutes. To use the cream, lotion, or ointment:

Apply enough medicine to cover the affected area, and rub in gently.

To use the gel:

Before using salicylic acid gel, apply wet packs to the affected areas for at least 5 minutes. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor. Apply enough gel to cover the affected areas, and rub in gently.

To use the pad:

Wipe the pad over the affected areas. Do not rinse off medicine after treatment.

To use the plaster for warts, corns, or calluses:

This medicine comes with patient instructions. Read them carefully before using. Do not use this medicine on irritated skin or on any area that is infected or reddened. Also, do not use this medicine if you are a diabetic or if you have poor blood circulation. Do not use this medicine on warts with hair growing from them or on warts on the face, in or on the genital (sex) organs, or inside the nose or mouth. Also do not use on moles or birthmarks. To do so may cause severe irritation. Wash the area to be treated and dry thoroughly. Warts may be soaked in warm water for 5 minutes before drying. Cut the plaster to fit the wart, corn, or callus and apply. For corns and calluses:

Repeat every 48 hours as needed for up to 14 days, or as directed by your doctor, until the corn or callus is removed. Corns or calluses may be soaked in warm water for 5 minutes to help in their removal.

For warts:

Depending on the product, either:

Apply plaster and repeat every 48 hours as needed, or

Apply plaster at bedtime, leave in place for at least 8 hours, remove plaster in the morning, and repeat every 24 hours as needed.

Repeat for up to 12 weeks as needed, or as directed by your doctor, until wart is removed.

If discomfort gets worse during treatment or continues after treatment, or if the wart spreads, check with your doctor.

To use the shampoo:

Before applying this medicine, wet the hair and scalp with lukewarm water. Apply enough medicine to work up a lather and rub well into the scalp for 2 or 3 minutes, then rinse. Apply the medicine again and rinse thoroughly.

To use the soap:

Work up a lather with the soap, using hot water, and scrub the entire affected area with a washcloth or facial sponge or mitt. If you are to use this soap in a foot bath, work up rich suds in hot water and soak the feet for 10 to 15 minutes. Then pat dry without rinsing.

To use the topical solution:

Wet a cotton ball or pad with the topical solution and wipe the affected areas. Do not rinse off medicine after treatment.

To use the topical solution for warts, corns, or calluses:

This medicine comes with patient instructions. Read them carefully before using. This medicine is flammable. Do not use it near heat or open flame or while smoking. Do not use this medicine on irritated skin or on any area that is infected or reddened. Also, do not use this medicine if you are a diabetic or if you have poor blood circulation. Do not use this medicine on warts with hair growing from them or on warts on the face, in or on the genital (sex) organs, or inside the nose or mouth. Also do not use on moles or birthmarks. To do so may cause severe irritation. Avoid breathing in the vapors from the medicine. Wash the area to be treated and dry thoroughly. Warts may be soaked in warm water for 5 minutes before drying. Apply the medicine one drop at a time to completely cover each wart, corn, or callus. Let dry. For warts—Repeat one or two times a day as needed for up to 12 weeks, or as directed by your doctor, until wart is removed. For corns and calluses—Repeat one or two times a day as needed for up to 14 days, or as directed by your doctor, until the corn or callus is removed. Corns and calluses may be soaked in warm water for 5 minutes to help in their removal. If discomfort gets worse during treatment or continues after treatment, or if the wart spreads, check with your doctor.

Unless your hands are being treated, wash them immediately after applying this medicine to remove any medicine that may be on them.

How often can you use wart off?

Wart Off Topical: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing Use this product on the as directed by your doctor. If you are self-treating, follow all directions on the product package. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or, First wash the affected area.

  1. You may soak it in warm water for about 5 minutes to soften it.
  2. Dry thoroughly.
  3. Your doctor may direct you to use a rough towel, pumice stone, file, or emery board to gently remove the top dead layers of thickened after soaking and before applying the liquid.
  4. Do not use sharp objects.
  5. Removing the dead helps the to work better.

Do not try to rub the, corn, or callus off. Using the applicator provided, apply a thin coat of the medication (one drop at a time) to cover the entire, corn, or callus. To minimize irritation, be careful not to get the liquid on surrounding, Let dry.

  1. Repeat this procedure 1 to 2 times daily as needed until the wart, corn, or callus is removed.
  2. For, you may use this product for up to 12 weeks.
  3. For and, you may use it for up to 2 weeks.
  4. Wash hands after use.
  5. Do not use this product on skin that is irritated, red, or infected.
  6. Avoid contact with the and face.

If this product gets on these areas or on healthy surrounding skin, wash it off right away. Flush the with water for 15 minutes. If irritation lasts, contact your doctor right away. Do not apply a large amount of this medication or apply it to a large area.

How long should I use podophyllin cream?

How do I use the treatment? Apply the cream directly to the warts twice a day (morning and evening) for 3 days and then stop treatment for the next 4 days. Do not use if your skin is sore or broken around the warts. Wash your hands after applying the cream.

What percentage of podophyllin should I use for warts?

Clinical Uses – Various uses of podophyllin in dermatology have been documented by Miller in 1985. However, its use has been discouraged in benign skin conditions because of the local irritation and also the increasing use of topical steroids. The irritative properties of podophyllin were the basis for its use in the treatment of molluscum contagiosum and pruritic conditions.

  1. It has shown comparable efficacy to 10% KOH in the treatment of molluscum contagiosum in a recent study from Iraq.
  2. Recently, a case report by Sharquie (2014) has shown the successful use of podophyllin 25% gel for the treatment of keratoacanthoma.
  3. Podophyllin has also been tried with varying success in the topical treatment of premalignant and malignant skin lesions such as actinic keratoses, keratoacanthoma, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and also as a systemic agent in the management of uterine carcinoma.

However, the mixed response and the high relapse rate forced researchers to abandon its use as an antineoplastic agent. Presently, podophyllin resin is used successfully for the topical treatment of anogenital warts. However, only Podofilox 0.5% gel has received FDA approval to be used in the treatment of anogenital warts.

  • It has also been tried for the treatment of cutaneous warts, but the results have not been so encouraging, which could be because of less drug penetration due to the thick horny layer.
  • Von Krogh has described the factors which can determine the therapeutic response of topical podophyllin therapy in anogenital warts.

The best response was seen with warts located in moist areas rather than on keratinized skin. All the dermatoses where the use of podophyllin has been reported are compiled in,