Pro Cure Products

0 Comments

Pro Cure Products

What is Pro-Cure used for?

Pro-Cure is a sticky gel that’s made with bits of baitfish and crustaceans. It has a strong scent and is designed to attract fish to your lure and get more strikes.

Who owns Pro-Cure?

Pro-Cure founder Phil Pirone with a dandy he landed while fishing with friend John Barnhart down in Astoria Oregon. Bloody Tuna Super Gel was the ticket. All About Adventure Excursions and 51 others like this. Northwest Best Bait Co.

How long does Pro-Cure last?

Contact

To place an order or contact us, call: 1-800-PRO-CURE (1-800-776-2873) For product information/order status call: 1-503-363-1037 FAX: 1-503-363-9782

EMAIL: [email protected] or [email protected] If you would like to request a FREE Products Catalog, our mailing address is: PRO-CURE, INC.P.O. Box 6109 Salem, OR 97304 If you’re in the area and want to stop by and visit our shop, our physical shop address is: 819 9thStreet NW Salem, OR 97304 If you’d like further information about Pro-Cure and you can’t find it in our FAQs, please get in touch.

  • Simply fill out the form, include your message, and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.
  • Tight Lines! PLEASE READ OUR FAQ BEFORE SENDING US A MESSAGE.
  • FAQ’S 1) What is the shelf life of your scents? Super Gels will last 7-10 years, Bait Oils, 3-5 years, Water Soluble 3-5 years, Bait Sauce 7-10 years.2) Should I keep scent on ice? It does not need to be.

Just keep it in a container, outside of direct sunlight or extreme heat whenever possible. It is real bait and this will cause it to spoil much faster.3) My pet ate my Pro-Cure is it going to hurt it? No it will not. We would be more concerned about the plastic bottle they are ingesting.

If they eat cured eggs or anything with dye just make sure they go outside to go to the bathroom. It will dye your carpet or flooring. You do want to be very careful about your dogs eating raw or partially cured salmon eggs. They can give dogs salmon poisoning.4) Can I inject Super Gel? It is not recommended.

It is extremely challenging to get Super Gel to come out of the needle and it is a very sharp object. Besides, once injected the Bait Oil will slowly leak out creating a fantastic scent trail.5) What type of scent should I use on bait or lures ? Pro-Cure Bait Scents offers a wide variety of scent options.

  1. For plastics, lures and hard baits you will want to run the Super Gel, Bait Sauce or Bait Waxx.
  2. For injecting or marinating real bait, run Bait Oils, and Water Soluble.
  3. Water Soluble is great for feather jigs or bait.6) How long do I let my herring brine in Brine N Bite? Once your brine is ready for use, you will want to open your tray of frozen herring the night before and pour your brine on the herring in a resealable container and let them sit out in room temperature overnight.

This will allow the herring to thaw and absorb the brine. This will firm up your baits and load the baits with amino based bite stimulants.7) What is different about your product then others? Pro-Cure Bait Scents is made of 100% real bait. Pro-Cure manufactured the first commercial egg cure on the market in 1984.8) Why should I use one egg cure over another egg cure? As many will attest, we don’t think you ever should use one over the other.

  • Every day is different.
  • Some days fish like a hotter cure, some days fish want a sweeter cure, that why it is a great idea to have a variety of egg cures with you when fishing, because every day is different.9) What can I use to clean Super Gel off my lures and boat? There are a couple options.1) Pro-Cure’s Bad Azz Hand and Lure Soap.2) liquid WD 40 10) I spilled dye on the floor of my boat how do I clean it off? You don’t.

The sun will break down the dye very quickly though and it will fade away rather quick. Just give it a little time. GUARANTEE: If for any reason you are unhappy with the performance of a PRO-CURE product, simply return it directly to PRO-CURE with your sales receipt.

  1. You’ll be promptly reimbursed your purchase price plus reasonable return postage.
  2. If you’ve lost your receipt, we’ll refund the current advertised price.
  3. SHIPPING & PROCESSING YOUR ORDER: Due to heavy order traffic, please allow 5 to 7 days for us to process your order and another 2 to 5 days for ground postage to get it to you.

If you are going on a trip and need product rushed out, we will make every attempt to get your order shipped as quickly as possible. Call 503-363-1037 and ask for your order to be shipped RUSH or choose Overnight, 2nd Day Air or 3rd Day Ground shipping from our shipping options when ordering online.

NOTE: Shipping charges will vary, due to package weight and destination for Overnight, 2nd Day Air or 3rd Day Ground. Please remember that Pro-Cure is a scent manufacturing company. We ship retail internet and phone orders to individual customers as a customer convenience. Some times we get overwhelmed.

So if you need your product right away, please call and we’ll do our best. Thanks, Phil Pirone RETURNS: Incorrect Merchandise: If for some reason you have received the incorrect merchandise, simply call 1-800-776-2873, or e-mail PRO-CURE to request return instructions.

Is Pro-Cure oil based?

Description. Pro-Cure Bait Oils are a legendary series of oil-based fishing scents and attractants.

What scents are salmon attracted to?

Skip to main content Advertisement

01 02 03 04 05

See Photo Gallery This upper tributary spring chinook couldn’t resist cured eggs topped with an orange-scaled Lil’ Corky. If fish are in the hole but not biting, don’t move on without first offering them something different. Photo by Scott Haugen. April 27, 2012 For nearly two hours I fished my favorite egg cure along the bottom of a deep ledge without so much as a nibble.

  1. Earlier in the morning, springers were rolling in the upper end of the hole and should have been stacked against the ledge I worked.
  2. Changing out Corky colors, I thought that might be the ticket.
  3. Not until I went with a different egg cure, however, did the bite turn on.
  4. No sooner had my first cast with a new egg recipe found bottom than a springer hammered it.

The aggressive bite turned on a feeding frenzy within the hole and in the next six casts, dad and I landed our limit of four keepers on the river. The scenario was no surprise, and if there’s one thing I’ve learned in my more than 40 years of catching spring chinook, it’s that the key to success can be found in targeting their strong sense of smell.

  • WHY SCENTS? Whether fishing with eggs, lures, driftbobbers or plugs, salmon scents can be applied (where legal) to just about anything presented to a salmon.
  • The use of scents opens up a whole new world to salmon fishing, allowing anglers to target the sense of smell in addition to sight.
  • Being able to appeal to both a salmon’s sense of sight and smell often yields success that otherwise wouldn’t happen.

If the human sniffer were as powerful as that of a salmon’s, life wouldn’t be enjoyable. Imagine filling your living room with water, then placing a single drop of shrimp oil in it. A salmon can detect the oil smell; we can’t even come close. With such an acute sense of smell, targeting a springer’s sense of smell offers huge benefits to open-minded anglers. Error code: If there’s one thing I’ve learned over my years of scent use while fishing for salmon, it’s to not limit yourself to a “favorite” scent. Just like egg cures, scents have their good and bad days. It has nothing to do with the scent flavors, or necessarily the brand of scents being used.

Instead, it comes down to what fish react to on any given day, and this can change. Take people, for instance. One day popcorn sounds good, the next day, chocolate chip cookies. What appeals to salmon can also change and having an array of scents to offer them can make the difference between catching fish or going home empty-handed.

Personally, my favorite scent is pure-grade anise oil. If I had one scent to use day in and day out, I’d choose anise oil. But there are days it simply doesn’t work. When fish are in a hole and not biting, it’s time to offer them a different bait, and/or a different scent.

When anise oil fails to produce, I’ll often switch to shrimp oil. If shrimp oil fails, I’ll try crawfish, tuna or some other scent. Vanilla extract, DMSO, herring oil, rootbeer extract and sugars are all proven salmon-getters. Salmon have an affinity to sweets, so keep that in mind. THE APPLICATION Today’s salmon scents can be applied to just about any terminal gear.

With the advent of super-sticky scents, Pro-Cure, for example, has made it possible to apply scents to the smoothest of lures, plugs and even hooks. The fact these sticky scents adhere to smooth metals and stay on in fast, turbulent water, greatly increases their effectiveness.

When curing eggs for salmon fishing, scents can be added during the curing process or added to the final cured product, just prior to fishing them. When springer fishing, try to have at least three different bait cures on-hand. Keep in mind that what works one day – or one hour – may not produce the next.

In this case, change is good. If fishing a Corky with yarn, scent can even be added to them. Some streams may not allow bait, but will allow the use of scents (be sure to check regulations for the streams being fished). Many anglers choose to handle baits and apply scents with rubber gloves.

  • This is because they don’t want human odors being transferred to the bait from the oils on their hands.
  • For this, rubber gloves made of nitrile are a favorite of anglers.
  • DIFFERENT BAIT = DIFFERENT SCENTS In addition to the use of consumer-applied lure scents, baits also produce unique scents.
  • Many egg anglers, for instance, use only a borax-based cure, allowing the natural smell of the egg to do the work.

Other’s add scent to their egg cures, the flavors of which are many. The reason we use baits is not so much because they look different, but rather the fact that they smell different. I’ll never forget the first time I used sand shrimp for spring chinook in the early 1970s.

  • I’d heard of a few anglers catching fish on sand shrimp, so decided to try it.
  • We were over 300 river miles from where the fish being targeted in an upper tributary last saw a shrimp, so I held little hope.
  • But after three of us quickly limited out I became a definite believer.
  • Not one bite came that day on our favorite egg cure; all came on sand shrimp.

This bait is still one of my favorites and goes to show the benefit of learning to think outside the box. In addition to using baits that may be natural to the setting in which you’re fishing, try baits that salmon encounter in the ocean. Remember, salmon are aggressive predators and feed on a wide variety of food when at sea.

  • Over the years, anglers have done well on cured salmon eggs, sand shrimp, chunks of herring, sardines and even eel.
  • Squid strips have also produced springers, as have baits like crawdad tails and even raw bacon-wrapped plugs.
  • Take into account the rivers being fished.
  • While fishing some rivers over the years, I can assure you I’ve had better success using crawdad tails and bright red, cured eggs than I have using those same baits in other rivers.

Remember, each bait carries its own unique odor and that’s often what entices a fish into biting it, not the sight of it. If you know salmon are in a hole and you’re not getting a bite, don’t leave that spot without trying at least one other bait or scent.

  • I don’t know how many times over the years I’ve fished a hole without getting a strike, then, when I leave, another angler comes in and immediately hooks a fish.
  • This usually has nothing to do with our styles of presentation, rather the fact the other angler gave the fish something different to smell.

The fish were there; I just failed to do my job of trying different offerings. THE DELIVERY When it comes to catching salmon by targeting their sense of smell, two approaches can be applied: Let the bait sit or cover water with it. No matter which approach you try, keep in mind the purpose of using scents is to establish a scent line that fish will eventually follow to your hook.

Which approach you use, passive or aggressive, comes down to the water being fished and the conditions faced. If targeting traveling fish in a narrow slot, keeping your bait in one place is a good idea for it allows a consistent scent trail to be laid down that the fish can follow. At the same time, if travel routes find fish moving slowly through them or they are wide in nature, then you may want to speed up things and take the presentation to the fish.

This can be done by back-bouncing, back-trolling plugs, casting lures or drift-fishing. By covering water you’re laying down more scent with the objective being to get a reaction bite from a salmon. If anchoring your bait in one spot, you’re establishing a scent trail the fish will detect and, hopefully, intentionally follow to the hook.

  1. If fishing amid ledges, seams and boils early in the morning or later in the evening when fish are moving, try to cover as much water as possible.
  2. At mid-day in the same hole, direct sunlight and fishing pressure may have salmon nosing tight against the ledge, close to the bottom.
  3. In this case, change your presentation style so it stays in one place, allowing the current to carry the scent right along the rock face where fish are stacked.

This mid-day approach will often find you hooking fish when other anglers have called it quits. If drift fishing or plugging a section of water and no bites occur, go back over the same water, but this time with a different bait or scent. Last spring a buddy and I back-bounced eggs through a prime salmon hole without so much as a bite.

  1. We rowed back upstream and this time ran a pair of plugs through the same water.
  2. The plugs were wrapped with tuna, and this time both rods went down; we landed one fish.
  3. The fish were there the whole time, they just liked the tuna aroma over the anise and sardine offerings we made to them the first time through.

SCENT OR MASK When it comes to scents, they serve two purposes. First, they offer an attractive smell that fish intentionally seek out. Second, they mask human odors. One thing the bass fishing world has taught salmon anglers is a sense of human scent awareness.

Studies conducted years ago on some of the top bass fishermen reportedly confirmed that their hands produced less oil than that of their competitors. This equates to less human odor being transferred to the terminal gear, thus more fish being caught. While many anglers use scents like sardine, shrimp or anise oil as a cover scent, other’s don’t want those odors on their hands at the end of the day.

Studies have also shown that lemon scented Joy soap cuts through oils extremely well, and explains why you’ll see a bottle or two of this soap in the boats of many top-notch salmon anglers. If using soap to keep things clean, apply it often, especially after touching any food.

  1. The nitrile-based rubber gloves also work to mask human odor, and many anglers choose to leave these on all day long.
  2. This spring, plan on paying close attention to the water being fished and don’t be afraid to experiment with a variety of scents on your outing.
  3. Whether they are in the form of bait, commercial or home-concocted scents, they can make a big difference for anglers when it comes to putting more meat in the freezer.
You might be interested:  Leg Pain After Running

Signed copies of Scott Haugen’s popular book, Egg Cures: Proven Recipes & Techniques, can be ordered from www.scotthaugen.com, or by sending a check for $15 (includes S&H), to Haugen Enterprises, P.O. Box 275, Walterville, OR 97489. Read The Next Article: Florida Man Breaks Butterfly Peacock Bass Record by a Fraction

What is bait fuel?

Developed in a Lab – Proven on the water, BaitFuel is SUPERCHARGED with F.A.S.T. – Fish Active Scent Technology –scientifically engineered to stimulate a fish’s predator instinct. BaitFuel provokes key predator aggression habits in fish stimulating more bites and longer hold times for your bait.

Where is pro cure headquarters?

Pro-cure’s headquarters are located at 819 9th Street Northwest, Salem, Oregon, 97304, United States What is Pro-cure’s phone number? Pro-cure’s phone number is (503) 363-1037 What is Pro-cure’s official website?

Does fish attractant work?

What is Fishing Attractant ? – A fishing attractant can be thought of as an attractive scent to lure bass, trout, walleye, catfish, panfish, carp, and many more species of fish. Using a natural scent that fish recognize as food, the attractants make the fish much more eager to not only swim toward your lure thinking they will get a great meal but also hang on to your line once they’ve bitten onto it.

What scent do salt water fish like?

So, what are the best scents and attractants for saltwater fishing? That depend, of course, on what you will be fishing for, where you will be fishing and what type of bait you will be using. For large predators like sharks, the fish oils and fish blood products work well. Baitfish oils and shrimp extracts work great for both inshore and offshore species and can be found in sprays, gels and powders from a variety of manufacturers. Most commercial products will have a mixture of some or all of these as well as salts, amino acids, anise and garlic.

  • I was introduced to bait cures just a few years ago.
  • Now for those of us who don’t know what a bait cure is, it is a product that you apply to your natural baits to preserve and enhance it.
  • Folks who fish for salmon have been using various products to cure salmon roe for years.
  • Bait cures are typically powder that has a mixture of salts amino acids and sometimes natural colors to 1.

Preserve you bait making it stay on the hook longer and 2. Add extra fish attractants and stimulants to increase your catch rate. A fishing buddy of mine, Kevin Stonebarger, introduced me to bait cure and using it on my cut mullet when fishing the surf.

For Info on Best Baits for Saltwater
Read: Two Best Baits for Fishing the Beach

And, fishing side by side, there was no doubt the baits with the cure out fished the baits without by at least a factor of 3 to 1. Not only that, but those previously frozen mullet that turned soft when thawed, were now much firmer and tougher so they stayed on the hook longer. Pro-Cure out of Salem, Oregon USA, has been a leader in the bait cure industry and they have cures with shrimp, menhaden and one called bloody tuna that works great for surf fishing. The folks at pro-cure have also taken their knowledge and experience with bait cures, and now have expanded into scents and attractants.

What is a Pro-Cure for shrimp?

Pro-Cure Shrimp N’ Prawn Cure is a highly-effective bait cure for increasing the effectiveness and extending the life of shrimp and prawn bait. Special curing salts toughen the bait and prevent spoilage. Loaded with complex amino acids to increase scent and trigger bites.

Is Fish oil soluble in water?

1. Introduction – Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential fatty acids, typically 18, 20, or 22 carbon atoms in chain length, Two important dietary long chain n-3 PUFAs are docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3), which are most often found in fish oil and are also commercially available as supplements,

  • Absorption DHA and EPA directly from diet or supplements is the only practical way to increase levels of these fatty acids in the body,
  • Omega-3 supplementation, and especially DHA, is associated with improvements in cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and high blood pressure,
  • Furthermore, Omega-3 deficiency may contribute to the development of psychiatric disorders, increased inflammatory processes, poor foetal development, increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease,

Despite this, Western diets are relatively low in omega-3 fatty acids, Modern agriculture and farming practices have decreased the DHA omega-3 content in many foods, including meat, eggs, and fish, Whereas human beings evolved on a diet balanced in omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids (i.e., 1:1), the methods used to increase food production have swung the balance dramatically toward omega-6 and reduced overall omega-3 consumption.

Domesticated livestock and poultry, which are a source of omega-3 precursors, are now predominantly reared on omega-6 rich seed based diets instead of plant based diets rich in omega-3, In addition to this, the availability of fast and highly processed foods in the Western diet have also produced an increased consumption of saturated fats, PUFAs and other unhealthy diet options, with a concomitant decrease in consumption of oily fish,

Far from the optimal 1:1 ratio of omega-6/3, the current, highly processed, Western diets show a dangerous 20:1 excess in favour of omega-6, This imbalance favours a more pro-inflammatory response in the body, and is thought to contribute to the prevalence of a range of inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis, obesity, and diabetes,

The relative paucity of omega-3 in the Western diet has elevated supplements to the primary contributors of DHA and EPA in the body, The utilisation of the beneficial effects of omega-3 supplements in the body, are limited by the extremely low water solubility and oral bioavailability of the fatty acid,

Ideally, lipid-based formulations are needed to improve the bioavailability of omega-3, The differences in the lipid structure in which DHA and EPA are delivered may influence their bioavailability. However, most current formulations are limited by moderate solubility, increased dispersion, and poor lipid digestion,

Taking the supplements with high fat meals can help improve their bioavailability. However, this necessitates a high fat diet and timely intake of the supplements with the meal, which may affect compliance, Emulsified fish oil preparations can also improve the digestion and enhance absorption of DHA and EPA compared with capsular supplements,

Indeed, clinical studies have demonstrated that emulsified preparations of DHA/EPA exhibits a high degree of efficient absorption compared with capsular form, However, the emulsifiers have to be carefully considered, taking into account physical instability and oxidative protection,

  • There is a need for biocompatible and stable lipidic materials that support solubilisation during dispersion and lipid digestion.
  • Alpha-tocopheryl phosphate mixture (TPM) is a safe new lipidic material made up of two phosphorylated forms of vitamin E.
  • TPM forms vesicles that encapsulate and solubilise poorly soluble materials, and has been shown to have range of positive effects when given orally,

Recent data have demonstrated that TPM can increase the in vitro solubility of a model lipophilic nutrient, co-enzyme Q 10, Consequently, further work was conducted to investigate the hypothesis that TPM’s solubilizing properties may enhance the oral delivery of CoQ 10 when compared to less solubilizing lipid formulations.

  • TPM was first combined with medium chain triglyceride (MCT) as a formulation for CoQ 10, and subjected to in vitro digestion experiments testing CoQ 10 solubility as a marker for digestion.
  • An increased amount of CoQ 10 was solubilized in the aqueous colloidal phase throughout the in vitro digestion of the formulation (three to four-fold), in comparison to the MCT lipid formulation without TPM,

The relative increase in solubility produced by the TPM was the same under both fed and fasted conditions, This improvement in drug solubilisation during in vitro digestion experiments was shown to translate to in vivo pharmacokinetic studies, Fasted rats were administered a single oral dose of CoQ 10 in MCT, in the presence and absence of TPM, and plasma concentrations determined over 24 h.

TPM significantly increased the CMAX and AUC by approximately two-fold when compared to the MCT control formulation, The increases in CoQ 10 solubility produced by TPM during in vitro digestion were clearly shown to correlate to superior in vivo bioavailability in rats. This correlation is anticipated in situations where bioavailability is strongly linked to solubilisation in the GI tract immediately prior to absorption.

These studies indicated the utility of TPM as a new lipid excipient for use in the oral delivery of poorly water soluble drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether TPM could increase the oral bioavailability of a second poorly soluble nutrient, omega-3 (predominantly DHA), following a single oral administration in rats.

What is the best scent for perch?

Bacon – It’s not just what brings you to breakfast, it’ll bring perch to your fishing hook. Use pieces of bacon raw for best results, as the oily scent it sends out will get the sleepiest perch up and at ‘em. It also will stay put on your hook longer.

Does procure work for bass?

Pro-Cure’s Trophy Bass Super Gel is great on your artificial bait. This gel has many different bait fish that bass love to eat!

What is the best scent for surf fishing?

Why fish with scent? The following article discusses the benefits of using scents on you plastic lures. – Fishermen devote lots of money and attention to their equipment. They will spend $100’s on rods, reels, and lures. If you walk into a quality tackle shop, you can easily be blown away by the different colors, sizes, and styles of lures.

Pro Cure Anchovy Sauce

Surf fishing this winter, we have had to deal with more rain than Southern Cal has received in decades. Beaches were murky all winter long but I still had plenty of 20 perch mornings in this dirty water. Every ten casts or so, I have trained myself to apply a thin coating of Pro Cure Sand Shrimp Sauce to my grubs and other plastic baits.

With this added scent I was able to leave a scent trail in the water that alerts the fish there is food nearby and helps the fish find my grub. Fishermen, while targeting Makos offshore, put out a chum slick while drifting, hoping a shark will follow the scent to its source. You are doing the same thing with your scented lure.

I remember reading a magazine article that said fish were put off by some smells. I remember that on the list were gas, sunscreen and some other harsh chemicals. Often people have to work with chemicals and solvents. Just touching your lure and leader with contaminated hands can repel fish.

  • My dad owns a business that makes potting soils.
  • Everyday his hands are exposed to fertilizers and harsh solvents.
  • He went surf fishing with me one morning and did not do well.
  • I had over 8 perch out of one hole while my dad couldn’t even get bit.
  • Dad was fishing the same hole with the same grub.
  • He was against using scent on his lures because he thought it wouldn’t make a difference.

He finally applied smelly jelly to the grub and started to catch fish. Since that trip, he is a believer in scent. The most important reason I use scents on my plastics is the fish hold onto your lure longer. Recently I experienced a great example of this.

  1. I went to Kenneth Hahn Park to do some trout fishing before work.
  2. I was sight casting mini jigs to schools of truck trout.
  3. At the time I had left my scent in the car and I didn’t feel like walking back to retrieve it.
  4. For about an hour I was watching the trout chase and mouth the tail of the jig but they never took it down far enough to hook themselves.

Annoyed, I went back to the car and grabbed my Crave Gravy. On my first cast with gravy on the bait 6 trout chased my jig and finally I watched as the jig disappeared in a trout’s mouth, “FISH ON!” All it took was a little flavoring to get the fish to eat.

  • The same thing happens when I fish large 6 1/2′” to 8″ swim baits for Calico Bass.
  • When fishing without scent, I get all kinds of short bites, with scent added to the plastics the fish tend to walk up the plastic instead of just attacking it without eating the hook.
  • When surf fishing I never fish the 1 ½” grub, I try to fish baits in the 2″ and 3″ range because I don’t really like catching 50 perch that are only 4″.

I’d rather pick off the larger perch. Now before you guys get on my case, small bait do catch big fish. I’ve seen it many times when albacore fishing. I have looked into the stomachs of Albacore in the 30 pound range and saw tons of small 1″ squid and small baits that only looked like 2 eyeballs and a wiggle.

When using bigger baits, you are narrowing your target to bigger fish. When fishing perch, I fish a 2″ or 3″ plastic and smear on Pro Cure so that I still attract the small fish to bite a bait that is too big for them. Quickly, this catches the attention of the big perch in the group and they will take the food away from dinks.

Today we are seeing a revolution in the relationship between plastic baits and scent. Years ago Berkley started making artificial baits that was impregnated with scent, making them appealing to fish. It all started with their Power Baits for Trout. Then they made some plastics that were designed only for fresh water fishing until now.

Last year they came out with a new series of baits called Gulp. These plastic like baits slowly dissolve in the water leaving a very strong scent trail that drives fish nuts. Early this year they introduced their saltwater series of Gulp baits. Berkley makes a few different baits for saltwater including the Peeler Crab, Shrimp and the Sandworm.

The Sandworm is now the most popular artificial bait amongst the perch fishing community. One reason is most guys are too lazy to apply scent. The reason why the gulp is so productive is because the scent is impregnated in the bait. Second, the Sandworm looks similar to the sandworms that are native to our beaches.

Gulp! baits are scent impregnated,

Scents on our plastics have great advantages weather you’re fishing the surf, fresh or saltwater. It’s something all anglers need to take advantage of. There are plenty of manufactures that make a great variety of scents for your kind of fishing. For fishing the surf I like fishing the Salted Anchovy Smelly Jelly or Pro Cure.

  • Pro Cure also makes a shrimp that works great in the surf zone.
  • When fishing for inshore bass, my two favorite scents are anchovy and squid.
  • Both baits are staples in the boats bait tanks and are natural forage for these fish.
  • Hot Sauce is also a good scent for our local bass while Pro cure makes a scent specially designed for enticing bass called Calico Cocktail.

Lastly, trout anglers have a wide variety of companies that make scents. The two most popular locally are Power Bait and Crave that makes sauces that are designed to attract fish. Power Bait makes Secret Sauce and Crave makes Cave Gravy. Both companies make their coactions in three flavors, Anise, Corn and Garlic.

What is the best Pro-Cure scent for inshore fishing?

How to Apply Pro-Cure to Artificial Baits – It’s quite simple, the oil is very tacky and can be messy but all I do is open the bottle, squeeze a generous amount of oil onto the bait and use your finger to evenly coat the lure. The scent usually stays on for fifteen casts or so. Here is a graphic demonstration: 1. Grab some yummy Pro-Cure, flavor of your choice. 2. Flip-up the Pro-Cure top 3. Apply a generous amount of gel to the side of your lure or bait as you see below: 4. Use your finger to evenly coat the lure or bait. Tips on How to Keep the Gel on Your Bait for Longer Another technique that I like using is squeezing the oil into the cavity of the soft plastics. This tends to hold the oil in the bait longer allowing for fewer applications and it is deadly. You can also cut small slits into existing soft baits that don’t already have one and, it’s equally effective. Which Scents Work the Best? I have used dozens of Pro-Cure scents over the years, but there are a few that have stood out. Threadfin Shad Super Gel – The ideal scent for most inshore applications. In the heat of the summer, this is a very popular scent that I use consistently.

  1. The whitebait is abundant on the flats, and I like to match the hatch.
  2. Shrimp Super Gel – One of the ultimate scents for saltwater fishing in our opinion.
  3. If you want to catch more fish, use and test this oil.
  4. I like to apply this scent to DOA Shrimp, Bite shrimp, and any gold swimming style bait.
  5. It’s deadly and you will soon agree.

Trophy Bass Super Gel – If you want to catch MORE big bass, start applying the trophy bass super gel to all of your Senko ‘s and soft plastics in general. Work the baits slow and let the scent do the work for you, it ‘s incredible! Inshore Saltwater Formula Super Gel – This is an overall great scent for ALL inshore species.

I typically do very well when targeting snook, redfish, trout, and flounder. It’s great to add to both hard baits and soft plastics. Storing of Pro-Cure There is no doubt that the gels can get messy and sticky, we recommend storing all opened containers out of direct heat and sunlight. We have found that they do fine in a cabinet in the garage after each fishing adventure,

I have had some extra bottles of Pro-Cure for years, and they have never hardened or ruined over time. I have yet to throw out a bottle due to it going bad, so the shelf life is quite extraordinary. When on the boat or kayak, I place the Pro-Cure containers in a Plano box or side storage of my tackle bag.

  • Conclusion You want the extra advantage if you are struggling to get bites or just want more action, pick you up some Pro-Cure and give it a try.
  • The cost is about $5-8 per bottle depending on where you purchase it but it’s a small investment for a great return.
  • Let us know below, what is your go-to scent? Have you tested it before? Does it make a difference? If you want more articles like this, share your suggestions below and we will do our best to cater to your needs and request.

Until next time, we will see you on the water. I also created a short video tutorial many years ago showing how to apply Pro-Cure, Our page has grown quite drastically since this video, but it still gives you an idea of how to apply the gel. Pretty straight forward and easy enough.

Does gulp gel work?

Berkley Gulp! Gel review BERKLEY Gulp! has been around for many years and helped drive the soft plastic revolution in this country. Besides offering a large range of innovative styles and sizes – Gulp! carries a deadly scent – one that really works. The scent was developed in the US by Berkley chemist John Prochnow.

It was tested in the lab and in the field (around the world) on various surfaces, different species, and all types of environments. The good news is Berkley has just released its Gulp! Gel. The rub-on-scent available in a tube works on the fish’s olfactory system (taste and smell) and allows for an easy application to all dry surfaces.

The boffins at Berkley say it also sticks to wet surfaces (re-applying), but dry is best if suitable. Is it the same as Gulp! plastics? The short answer is yes! The attractants used are mush the same with the scent dispersing in water so the fish can detect the baits by taste and smell.

  1. Berkley recommends rubbing the scent on connection points such as split rings and the underside of hardbody lures.
  2. They also suggest re-applying regularly.
  3. I’ve been using the Gel over the past month or so on several salt and freshwater trips and can vouch for its effectiveness.
  4. I’ve used the Gulp! plastics for years and after catching everything from bream, flathead, estuary perch to trout and bass using the Gel, there’s no doubt it’s equally effective.

I’ve been using it on soft plastic and hard bodies; practically any lure I’m throwing at fish will be smothered in Gulp! Gel. As Berkley suggests, I found it does need re-applying, so it’s best to keep the tube handy at the top of your tackle bag. For its convenience and proven effectiveness, the new Berkley Gulp! Gel has quickly become an essential item in my bag.

What is the best cure for salmon eggs?

Learn To Cure Extra Sweet Salmon Eggs For Bobber & Back Bouncing By: Andy Martin Floating a gob of roe below a bobber, or back-bouncing a tiny cluster of salmon eggs into a deep pool, are two of the most effective techniques for catching fall king salmon on the coastal rivers of Oregon, Washington and California.

The key to successful bait fishing for kings is having good eggs, cured properly. I have used countless variations of commercial cures mixed with other ingredients, and for fall kings my favorite is what I call “extra sweet” salmon eggs, a combination of Pautzke’s Pink and Red Fire Cure with added sugar and borax.

The extra sweet eggs are often different than what everyone else is using. The sugar makes them sweet, sometimes triggering strikes from fish that normally wouldn’t bite, while the borax helps increase the shelf life of the bait while it is in the fridge, allowing you to keep the eggs for several weeks before freezing them. For extra sweet salmon eggs, I like to use 1 cup of Red Fire Cure, 1 cup of Pink Fire Cure, 1/2 cup sugar and 1/2 cup borax. The mixture of Pink/Red Fire Cure creates a brilliant bright red bait, instead of the deeper, darker red of plain Red Fire Cure. To cure eggs, begin by butterflying the skeins from top to bottom. Split the skeins in half lengthwise, which will help the eggs cure more evenly, while also reducing the number of loose eggs when you cut the roe into bait-size pieces. Next, take the sections of roe that have been butterflied and cut those into chunks between the size of a golf ball and tennis ball. It is important to cut the sections crosswise along the fold, or rib, of the skein. You will notice numerous rows of eggs. In a plastic bag I mix the one part Pink Fire Cure, one part Red Fire Cure, half part sugar and half part borax (many anglers use Natural BorX O Fire for this). After the ingredients are thoroughly mixed together, they are ready to sprinkle onto the eggs. Make sure the sugar and borax are well mixed and there are not large gobs of borax or sugar. Pour a generous amount of the cure onto the eggs and gently mix. Be extremely careful not to crush the eggs. After mixing, add more cure and mix again. Typically, I use 1 cup of cure for 4-5 cups of eggs. After the eggs have a light coating of cure they are ready to be placed in a large plastic zipper bag to be cured. I like to cure the eggs in gallon bags and cure them at room temperature. The cure works best around 50 degrees. A cold fridge will slow down the curing process, while heat will ruin the eggs. If you want to add scent, now is the time to add a few drops of Liquid Krill, tuna, shrimp or sardine oil. I like to cure the eggs in the garage, but will place them in the fridge if the weather is hot. After a few hours you will notice the eggs are beginning to juice up. The cure causes the eggs to expel liquid. The eggs will later soak most of the juice back up. Don’t pour out the excess juice until the eggs have cured for at least two and preferably three days. After three days of curing, these eggs are ready to be dried. They are plump and round, and preserved well enough to store in the fridge for weeks at a time. The sugar and borax has been soaked up by the eggs. Before fishing, the eggs must be dried. Drying toughens the eggs up and makes them last longer in the water.

Eggs that have not been dried will milk out in just a few minutes and turn white. Eggs that have been dried too long will fish like rocks and not milk out. For bobber eggs, I like to dry the eggs for 8-12 hours. For back bouncing, I will dry for up to 24 hours. I spread them out on newspaper (don’t worry about the eggs soaking up ink, they won’t).

Drying outside with a gently breeze works best. After drying, place the eggs in a clean bag and keep cool. They can be stored in the fridge for up to a month, or frozen and used next year. Glass jars work best if you plan to freeze for more than a few months.

How long do cured eggs last?

Leave the eggs in the low oven to dehydrate for about 2 hours, until firm. Let cool completely. Grate into salad dressings, over pastas, pizzas or toasts, then finish your dish with a pinch of Morton Coarse Sea Salt. Cured yolks will keep covered and refrigerated for up to one month.

What is a Pro-Cure for shrimp?

Pro-Cure Shrimp N’ Prawn Cure is a highly-effective bait cure for increasing the effectiveness and extending the life of shrimp and prawn bait. Special curing salts toughen the bait and prevent spoilage. Loaded with complex amino acids to increase scent and trigger bites.

How do you use Pro-Cure?

procure – verb verb NAmE / / prəˈkyʊr / /, NAmE / / proʊˈkyʊr / / Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they procure 1 ( formal ) to obtain something, especially with difficulty procure something (for somebody/something) She managed to procure a ticket for the concert. They procured a copy of the report for us. procure somebody something They procured us a copy of the report. 2 procure (somebody) to provide a prostitute for someone

See in the Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary : procure verb – Definition, pictures, pronunciation and usage notes | Oxford Advanced American Dictionary at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com

What is the best scent for bream fish?

Advanced Lure Fishing Do scents work? Which ones are best? KEVIN SAVVAS answers these and other questions in this informative piece on scented soft plastics. A HOT topic in fishing for quite a while now has been the legitimacy of attractants on lures in competitions as well as in general fishing.

I fish a few competitions here and there and it’s quite amusing to hear the antics that go on. The general debate has revolved around the ethics involved in using scents. Most scented plastics are constructed from natural sources such as starch compounds, similarly used in the feed for aquaculture fish, or are made from biodegradable materials.

This is in stark contrast to the original PVC varieties that most fishos are accustomed to see hanging on the shelves. I guess the debate has never really been reconciled. In the blue corner you have the “purists” who turn their noses up at the notion of using an un-natural presentation made of natural ingredients.

  1. In their eyes it sort of defeats the purpose.
  2. They would much prefer the joy of catching a fish based purely on deception without the use of added attractants.
  3. In the red corner you have the “capitalists” who will use any lure or technique that catches them the most fish.
  4. I guess for most of us the argument is irrelevant.

To a competition guru signed up to a brand that uses standard plastics instead of scented ones then the argument holds a little more sensitivity. Either way it’s best to stand at arms length and let both corners fight it out between themselves. One thing that has never been in dispute is the fact these new breed of so-called eco-friendly natural-based soft baits catch plenty of fish.

  • The influx of new brands competing for shelf space is testament to that.
  • Not to mention existing brands that have launched their own recipes to try and stem the flow of lost revenue to their competitors.
  • For me, I love ’em.
  • I never used to.
  • I hated the fact I would pay 10 bucks for fandangle new Gulps or Food Co.

lures only to have them come out of the packet at right-angles. That really got under my skin. If I couldn’t sell the concept to myself I sure as hell couldn’t expect to sell it to a fish. So I steered clear for a very long time. Admittedly since those early days manufacturing has improved somewhat.

  • Now when I reach my hand in a packet of Gulps only 50 per cent of them come out bent! In some respects I’ve come back to the dark side.
  • I’m not immune to fish talk, no die-hards are, but I just couldn’t resist trying them again after years of hype.
  • The popularity has existed long enough now for it not to a flash-in-the-pan craze either.

Since going back a while ago now there’s no denying my catch rates have improved as a result. This is from using lures impregnated with scent or attractants such as S-Factor that are topically applied. This relates to most of my local target species as well.

  1. I don’t think I would feel confident if I went fishing without them these days.
  2. The X-Files So why are scents or attractants so effective? If you ask any of the manufacturers that question you’ll get a varied response.
  3. If you believe the marketing blub blazoned across some of the packaging you could be fooled into thinking they are more potent than live natural baits.

The unfortunate scenario is newcomers starting their soft plastic careers tend take that marketing jive as gospel. Don’t get me wrong, in the right hands and in the right situations scented lures will out-fish anything around. But is this a realistic expectation for everybody? I think not.

The particulars about “why'” the various scents work has been an open forum. The information on “how” they work is a closely guarded secret. Honestly, when I tried to conduct some research for this piece I was met with intrigue and collusion more fitting for a spy movie. Only S-Factor’s founder Dr Ben Diggles was generous with information and gave me more than I could ever hope to comprehend.

I guess from that standpoint this is quite a subjective analysis. Without delving into the science of scents, as I’m far from qualified to make any scientific assertions, what I can tell you is that the attractants are designed to appeal to a fish’s sense of taste and smell.

  • This isn’t a particularly new idea as berley has been used in fishing as long as Adam was a boy.
  • From smelling berley fish can be attracted from sometimes kilometres away.
  • Where the concept is a little newer is in the taste.
  • Fish, apparently, can taste the flavour of food without having the food in their mouth, albeit from a very close range.

Some species of fish actually have taste buds on the outside of their mouth and can taste while drawing water into their mouths while breathing. Consequently, a better tasting lure attracts more fish. If the taste is suitable fish hold onto the lure for a longer period of time.

  • Fairly straight forward stuff! There are several types of scents on the market.
  • All have different ways they disperse in the water.
  • The various manufacturers obviously tell us their own unique blend is the optimal delivery.
  • To simplify matters, attractants can be broken down into two categories: water soluble and insoluble.

Due to their highly developed sense of taste, a fish’s tastebuds respond to specific water soluble compounds. These disperse in water easily and can be tasted easily; S-Factor, Gulps and Exudes all fall into this category. Oil-based products are insoluble and therefore do not disperse easily in water. The benefits of choosing the right scents are many. The results of choosing the wrong scents are fishless trips. While research has shown some scents to be attractants, most of the products sitting on the shelves are actually repellents. This means some of you are using lures that make fish skedaddle in the other direction.

It would be an interesting statistic to know what percentage of first time fishos using these lures don’t get a touch and dismiss the true power of soft plastics. The sad reality is most of them come up empty handed. Some may even turn to another sport! How do you know which scents are dodgy? Well, most of the products designed for the American large mouth bass fishery are dubious.

Steer clear of these and aim for popular, credible brands Killer Combos I certainly have a few combinations now that over several months have revolutionised the way I go about my estuary angling. I mainly fish Sydney waterways but I can’t see why these patterns wouldn’t be applicable to other areas and other species.

My No.1 target on soft plastics is jewfish. While catching jewies on plastics has been well publicised in the fishing media, jewies still are an interesting and formidable target. My dad’s favourite song “Some days are diamonds, some days are stone” is pretty spot-on. I’m glad to report that days of stone are becoming fewer and farther between.

After a quick calculation I estimated historically that when we sounded out jewies on the Lowrance we used to hook up 20-30 per cent of the time. This is a fairly reasonable hook-up rate; one that we were proud of, anyway. Since we’ve started to incorporate attractants into the mix that rate has climbed to over 60 per cent.

  1. Two out of every three times we find fish located on the sounder it results in a hooked jewie! My current favourites are the Berkley 4″ and 5″ Power Minnows with S-Factor, Berkley Gulp 5″ Jerkshads and Atomic 6″ Jerk Minnows with S-Factor.
  2. These three combinations I use cyclically and at this stage can’t find a clear-cut top performer.

What I can say is that jewies absolutely love these presentations and they should be in the arsenal of all would-be jewie fishos. Our best session has seen 16 jews caught in less than one hour. What should be noted is that I only use minnow or stickbait types of profiles exclusively.

  • I tend not to waste my time on fish and shad profiles anymore.
  • This has probably more to do with my preferred style of retrieve than anything else.
  • On the smaller scale my catch-rates on bream and perch have definitely improved.
  • The one area where I have noticed the biggest difference is when these fish are shutdown.

Typically bream and perch are quite easy to catch when they are in a feeding mood. When conditions change and they clock-off the bite they can be the most frustrating fish in the sea. I’m finding scents are allowing me to target these inactive fish with some degree of success.

  • It’s important to note that scents are not a magical antidote.
  • Lures have to be worked painstakingly slow and methodically to get these shutdown fish to bite.
  • When the scent is wafted in the face of the fish long enough for the fish to taste and smell it, then my catch rates improve as a result.
  • Usually the bites are still quite timid and reaction times need to be lightning fast.

Bream and perch have a tendency to spit the lure extremely quick. So much for the marketing blurb that fish just “hold-on”! The killer scent for bream is the Gulps. This should come as no surprise. The comp gurus have been utilising this product for quite a while now. I simply can’t go past the 2″ Shrimp and 2″ Grubs in all colours on bream. For some added zest, use S-Factor on the Gulps when the fish are really playing hardball.

  • S-Factor is the business on our native species.
  • S-Factor was actually field tested on bass as well as snapper, bream, barra and jewies.
  • For this reason it is the dominant player in the sweet water.
  • Use sparingly though, as Dr Diggles informed me it’s like adding chilli to food.
  • Just the right amount makes the lure taste better, use too much and fish will burn their mouths.

The new Atomic Guzzlerz and Ripperz seem to be the goods as well. I have used the Atomic range extensively over the past three years and recently started to add S-Factor to them. They were my go-to brand for a long time. Even though the new Guzzler Bio-Baits now include a scent, I guess out of habit I still apply S-Factor.

  1. The new 3″ Jerk Minnows are deadly and are a great mixed-bag option.
  2. They are slightly too big for bream and slightly too small for jewies but still catch their fair share of both species and a swag of flatties in the process.
  3. The Prongs are a real winner on bream as well.
  4. The good news here is the Guzzlerz won’t dry out left out of the bag.

They only biodegrade when left in the water for a period of time. The Ripperz are basically the old Atomics but repackaged. They also have scent but not as powerful as the newer Guzzlerz. Slam Baits with Ultrabite should rate some mention. While I haven’t had particular success I probably haven’t given them the necessary attention either.

I will concede they are decent on flatties and are quite resilient to the raspy teeth of the dusky. My dad loves ’em because he feels he gets value for money. The one lure catches him plenty of fish. My only concern with Slams is the pheromone technology used. It was developed on European species so therefore not really specific to our fish.

Surely there isn’t a universal pheromone that stimulates all species? New Zealanders go nuts over it, though. Some other notable success stories are the new Fishbites Xtreme out of the Basser Millyard stable. These have been quite successful on kingfish in the Pittwater area and are quite a durable plastic, too.

  1. The lure that’s been doing the damage has been the Fishbites 5″ Jerk Bait, typically in the ghost colour (white).
  2. Silver trevallies in Botany don’t seem to mind them either.
  3. There is also another player on the market with little publicity thus far.
  4. Well, that’s the case in NSW anyway.
  5. They are Exudes from Queensland’s L.

Wilson & Co. While on the surface they look like any other scented competitor, initial field testing has found them to be decent on our estuary species. While I haven’t used them enough to be categorically convinced, if the current catch rates continue we might have another option to S-Factor and Gulps.

The scent used claims to be water soluble and the marketing spiel is impressive as well. Keep your eye out for this one. The last point here should be on the S-Factor. By now I’m sure you can tell I live and die by this stuff. My only issue is that in order to obtain it Squidgy corners you to buy their lures.

It’s a cunning marketing plan and I understand why they do it. My personal opinion is this attractant should be sold separately. I still use Squidgys and don’t discourage their appeal but the S-Factor will make any lure a true fish catcher. Admittedly the Squidgys’ design and texture does hold the S-Factor goo better than most smooth surface lures where re-application is done more regularly.

What is the best scent for surf fishing?

Why fish with scent? The following article discusses the benefits of using scents on you plastic lures. – Fishermen devote lots of money and attention to their equipment. They will spend $100’s on rods, reels, and lures. If you walk into a quality tackle shop, you can easily be blown away by the different colors, sizes, and styles of lures.

Pro Cure Anchovy Sauce

Surf fishing this winter, we have had to deal with more rain than Southern Cal has received in decades. Beaches were murky all winter long but I still had plenty of 20 perch mornings in this dirty water. Every ten casts or so, I have trained myself to apply a thin coating of Pro Cure Sand Shrimp Sauce to my grubs and other plastic baits.

  1. With this added scent I was able to leave a scent trail in the water that alerts the fish there is food nearby and helps the fish find my grub.
  2. Fishermen, while targeting Makos offshore, put out a chum slick while drifting, hoping a shark will follow the scent to its source.
  3. You are doing the same thing with your scented lure.

I remember reading a magazine article that said fish were put off by some smells. I remember that on the list were gas, sunscreen and some other harsh chemicals. Often people have to work with chemicals and solvents. Just touching your lure and leader with contaminated hands can repel fish.

  • My dad owns a business that makes potting soils.
  • Everyday his hands are exposed to fertilizers and harsh solvents.
  • He went surf fishing with me one morning and did not do well.
  • I had over 8 perch out of one hole while my dad couldn’t even get bit.
  • Dad was fishing the same hole with the same grub.
  • He was against using scent on his lures because he thought it wouldn’t make a difference.

He finally applied smelly jelly to the grub and started to catch fish. Since that trip, he is a believer in scent. The most important reason I use scents on my plastics is the fish hold onto your lure longer. Recently I experienced a great example of this.

I went to Kenneth Hahn Park to do some trout fishing before work. I was sight casting mini jigs to schools of truck trout. At the time I had left my scent in the car and I didn’t feel like walking back to retrieve it. For about an hour I was watching the trout chase and mouth the tail of the jig but they never took it down far enough to hook themselves.

Annoyed, I went back to the car and grabbed my Crave Gravy. On my first cast with gravy on the bait 6 trout chased my jig and finally I watched as the jig disappeared in a trout’s mouth, “FISH ON!” All it took was a little flavoring to get the fish to eat.

  • The same thing happens when I fish large 6 1/2′” to 8″ swim baits for Calico Bass.
  • When fishing without scent, I get all kinds of short bites, with scent added to the plastics the fish tend to walk up the plastic instead of just attacking it without eating the hook.
  • When surf fishing I never fish the 1 ½” grub, I try to fish baits in the 2″ and 3″ range because I don’t really like catching 50 perch that are only 4″.

I’d rather pick off the larger perch. Now before you guys get on my case, small bait do catch big fish. I’ve seen it many times when albacore fishing. I have looked into the stomachs of Albacore in the 30 pound range and saw tons of small 1″ squid and small baits that only looked like 2 eyeballs and a wiggle.

  • When using bigger baits, you are narrowing your target to bigger fish.
  • When fishing perch, I fish a 2″ or 3″ plastic and smear on Pro Cure so that I still attract the small fish to bite a bait that is too big for them.
  • Quickly, this catches the attention of the big perch in the group and they will take the food away from dinks.

Today we are seeing a revolution in the relationship between plastic baits and scent. Years ago Berkley started making artificial baits that was impregnated with scent, making them appealing to fish. It all started with their Power Baits for Trout. Then they made some plastics that were designed only for fresh water fishing until now.

Last year they came out with a new series of baits called Gulp. These plastic like baits slowly dissolve in the water leaving a very strong scent trail that drives fish nuts. Early this year they introduced their saltwater series of Gulp baits. Berkley makes a few different baits for saltwater including the Peeler Crab, Shrimp and the Sandworm.

The Sandworm is now the most popular artificial bait amongst the perch fishing community. One reason is most guys are too lazy to apply scent. The reason why the gulp is so productive is because the scent is impregnated in the bait. Second, the Sandworm looks similar to the sandworms that are native to our beaches.

Gulp! baits are scent impregnated,

Scents on our plastics have great advantages weather you’re fishing the surf, fresh or saltwater. It’s something all anglers need to take advantage of. There are plenty of manufactures that make a great variety of scents for your kind of fishing. For fishing the surf I like fishing the Salted Anchovy Smelly Jelly or Pro Cure.

  1. Pro Cure also makes a shrimp that works great in the surf zone.
  2. When fishing for inshore bass, my two favorite scents are anchovy and squid.
  3. Both baits are staples in the boats bait tanks and are natural forage for these fish.
  4. Hot Sauce is also a good scent for our local bass while Pro cure makes a scent specially designed for enticing bass called Calico Cocktail.

Lastly, trout anglers have a wide variety of companies that make scents. The two most popular locally are Power Bait and Crave that makes sauces that are designed to attract fish. Power Bait makes Secret Sauce and Crave makes Cave Gravy. Both companies make their coactions in three flavors, Anise, Corn and Garlic.