Quotes On Prevention Is Better Than Cure

0 Comments

Quotes On Prevention Is Better Than Cure
And now, the VOA Learning English program Words and Their Stories. Sometimes in life, you need to act quickly. Thinking too much about a problem does not always help. It can hold us back. We have expressions that describe this way of thinking. “No time like the present.” “A rolling stone gathers no moss,” “Just do it!” But sometimes slower is better.

Many things in life require careful thought and preparation. Sometimes we need to be cautious and take precautions. A great expression for that kind of behavior is, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” This saying comes to us from Benjamin Franklin. In addition to being a writer, Franklin was a printer, political thinker, politician, scientist, inventor and diplomat.

He was also one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. So, he was a busy man. But Franklin still found time to write and offer his advice to others. If he were alive today, he could probably make a good living as a life coach. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” is one of his most famous sayings.

Now, Franklin lived during the 1700s, before the metric system took effect in Europe. The word ounce means something really small – just two one-hundredths of a kilogram to be exact. So, his expression meant that, when dealing with a problem, spending a small amount of time and effort early on is a good investment.

It can save you more trouble in the end. For example, if a country announces strong measures for containing a virus, we could say, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” It is better to take severe precautions than to suffer severe consequences later.

  • Word historians say that when Franklin first used this expression, he was not talking about disease but rather fire prevention.
  • During a visit to Boston in 1733, Franklin was impressed with the city’s fire prevention methods.
  • He tried to bring some of these practices to the city of Philadelphia, where he lived.

Supposedly, Franklin sent an unsigned letter to his own newspaper The Pennsylvania Gazette, Published on February 4, 1735, his letter – “Protection of Towns from Fire” – began with the expression “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Then he wrote about how a city should prepare itself for a fire.

  1. From protecting yourself against sickness to preventing a house fire, this expression can be used in serious situations.
  2. It is a fixed expression, meaning we don’t change the wording when we use it.
  3. We simply repeat it as is.
  4. Let’s listen to this example: How is the deal going with your real estate agent? Are you ready to buy your new house? Just about.

I have a few more questions about home insurance, So, I’m meeting with a financial advisor and an insurance agent this week. They are sure to give you a lot of information. Do you really think it’s necessary? An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

If I get anything wrong, it will be difficult to fix later on. And it will cost more, too! Didn’t you lose a lot of money on repairs to your house because it was under-insured? Um Good point. Let’s change the subject! Now, another way to say this expression is “Better safe than sorry.” We use this one for many different situations – serious and not so serious.

Let’s listen to this dialogue, What a great day to be at the park! Thanks for the invite! Sure thing. The weather is great! So, why did you bring an umbrella? Well, the weather forecast said it could rain later today. I heard that too. But look – there’s not a cloud in the sky! Oh, no! You cannot be serious! Quick! Come under my umbrella! See.

  • Better safe than sorry.
  • Okay, okay! Good point.
  • Now, let’s get out of this rain.
  • Here it is better to say “better safe than sorry.” Benjamin Franklin’s advice would have sounded a little too serious.
  • And that’s the end of this Words and Their Stories ! The next time you want to take care and avoid problems down the road use the expressions you heard here.

Until next time I’m Anna Matteo! Anna Matteo wrote this story for VOA Learning English. George Grow was the editor.

Who said the quote prevention is better than cure?

Prevention is better than cure – Matt Hancock’s speech to IANPHI We’re here to talk prevention. And if there’s one thing that everybody knows it’s: ‘prevention is better than cure’. When I was thinking about prevention I looked into where this comes from. I’m told it was Erasmus, the 16th century Dutch philosopher, who coined the insight.

  • The irony was that Erasmus died suddenly from an attack of dysentery, which we now know is a wholly preventable condition.
  • The other person who can lay claim was Benjamin Franklin, who said: ‘an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure’.
  • And Franklin founded the first fire brigade in Philadelphia and made it one of the safest cities for fires in the world.

So prevention works. As the founding fathers knew.

  1. Prevention saves lives and saves money.
  2. Two of the biggest health successes of the 20th century had prevention at their core: vaccination and cutting smoking.
  3. In the UK, both were achieved by careful and considered government intervention.
  4. We didn’t outlaw cigarettes because blanket bans curtail personal freedoms and often have the opposite effect.
  5. We encouraged better behaviour through informing the public and by stopping smoking in public places where it could affect the health of others.

We didn’t compel people to vaccinate against their will. We helped them see it was in their interests and everybody else’s too. Ultimately, at the heart of our public provision for healthcare there’s a social contract. A social contract at the heart of our NHS.

  • We, the citizens, have a right to the healthcare we need, when we need it, free at the point of use.
  • But, we have a responsibility to pay our taxes to fund it, and to use the health service carefully, with consideration for others, and to comply with medical advice to look after ourselves.
  • Because the NHS is not just a service – it’s a shared stake in society.

Too much of the health debate in England has been about our rights: what we deserve, and what the NHS can deliver. And, of course, those rights are important. But, I think we need to pay more attention to our responsibilities, as well as our rights. Today, I want to talk about those responsibilities, and our task for the National Health Service to help empower people to take more care of their own health.

I want to talk about how we need to focus more on prevention to transform our health and social care system, save money, eliminate waste and make the extra £20.5 billion we’re putting in go as far as it can. Because only with better prevention can our NHS be sustainable in the long term. Over just the last year, emergency admissions at A&E have increased by 6.6%.

This rate of growth of demand is simply unsustainable. But, of course, it’s not just about the finances. I want to talk about how preventing ill health can transform lives, and transform society for the better too. That might sound radical. It is intended to.

  1. The government-wide plan we are publishing today sets out how we need a radical shift in how the NHS sees itself, from a hospital service for the ill, to a nationwide service to keep us healthy.
  2. Where those who work on the front line of the NHS including the GPs, who are its bedrock, feel confident to remind people of their responsibilities too.
  3. So first, let’s talk about those responsibilities.

At the core of my political philosophy is a belief that the state has a duty to protect the most vulnerable in society, and an equally firm belief that we must empower people to fulfil their potential to be the best they possibly can be. From the education they receive in school, to the freedom they have to achieve in work.

  • And nowhere is this more true than with health.
  • Given this duty, our starting point is to ask: what contributes to living longer in good health?
  • The Prime Minister has set this question as part of the Ageing Grand Challenge – to seek 5 years’ longer healthy life expectancy by 2035.
  • The best evidence points to a 4-factor breakdown.

Around a quarter of what leads to longer healthier life is acute care – or what goes on in hospitals. The second factor is genetics. The third factor is environmental – things like air quality that an individual can’t control.

  1. And the final factor is what people do – the choices they make, the lifestyle they choose.
  2. Different people put different proportions on these 4 factors: but suffice to say they’re all important.
  3. Yet currently, we spend the overwhelming majority of the £115 billion NHS budget on acute care.
  4. Last year, we spent just £11 billion on primary care where the bulk of prevention happens.
  5. Yet the combination of prevention and predictive medicine have more than twice the impact on length of healthy life.
  6. That isn’t just the difference between life and death, it’s the difference between spending the last 20 years of your life fit and active, or in a chronic condition.

So our focus must shift from treating single acute illnesses to promoting the health of the whole individual. And from prevention across the population as a whole to targeted, predictive prevention. So as the government is spending £20.5 billion more of taxpayers’ hard-earned cash over the next 5 years – the single, largest cash injection to the NHS ever – we must see the proportion of funding on primary and community care in the NHS rise.

And that is exactly what will happen in the long-term plan. But it isn’t just about the quantum of money. It’s also about reform. I want to see people taking greater personal responsibility for managing their own health. For looking after themselves better, so staying active and stopping smoking. Now, I want to address head on how we can do this without undermining people’s liberty.

Take alcohol. Like many people, I enjoy the odd glass of wine. I support the budget in which we froze duty on scotch and beer. I don’t believe in punishing the masses to target those who need help. Yet alcohol abuse puts a huge burden on the NHS. High-risk drinkers make up less than 5% of the population, but consume over a third of all alcohol.

They’re more likely to end up in A&E. And drunk people are more likely to be responsible for abuse and violent attacks on NHS staff. I’ve seen it for myself. So we need action on alcohol that targets those who most need our support, without punishing those who don’t. Likewise, we know that smoking contributes to 4% of all hospital admissions in England each year.

And smoking costs the NHS around £2.5 billion each year. And this is despite the massive reduction in smoking over the past 30 years. For smoking, the next step towards a zero-smoking society is highly targeted anti-smoking interventions, especially in hospitals.

If someone is admitted as a heart patient, and we know that stopping smoking could save their life, then we will do everything we can to help them quit, as they do in Ottawa. This is a Canadian model I like the look of. I want to see bedside interventions in our hospitals so smokers who are patients are offered medication, behavioural support and follow-up checks when they go home.

And we need to fulfil our commitments to the obesity strategy, and set ambitious targets also on salt. Salt intake has fallen by 11% in under a decade, but if salt intake fell by a third it would prevent 8,000 premature deaths and save the NHS over £500 million annually.

  1. So we are working on new solutions to tackle salt and will set out more details by Easter.
  2. Because focusing on the responsibilities of patients shouldn’t be about penalising people but about helping people to make better choices.
  3. How do we do that? How can we empower people to take more care of their own health? By giving people the knowledge, skills and confidence to take responsibility for their own health.
You might be interested:  How To Cure Tmj Permanently

By using new digital technologies, to help people make informed decisions, with more access to primary and community care, and with more social prescribing, all aimed at stopping people from becoming patients in the first place. So the second thing I want to talk about is how we must focus more on prevention to transform our health and social care system to save money, eliminate waste and get the best return on our extra £20.5 billion.

This isn’t just about empowering people to take more personal responsibility. It’s about reforming the system and harnessing new opportunities. There are 2 new technologies in particular with the potential to change everything: the combination of artificial intelligence and genomics. They promise the potential to unlock our genetic codes; and allow us to apply those codes to how we live our lives.

To predict which of us are susceptible to which illnesses, to diagnose those already ill, faster, and to develop new tailor-made treatments to bring people back to health. Together, they will transform medicine. We are finally now able to crack that genetic factor of our health.

We can intervene earlier. Save money on unnecessary and invasive tests. Eliminate waste by prescribing the right medication or the right treatment the first time round. And save NHS resources for people who really need it. And this isn’t something that’s far off in the future. It’s already happening. The new NHS Genomic Medicine Service is expanding.

In Cambridge, we’re at the cusp of sequencing the 100,000th genome, and are now aiming to sequence 5 million so we can diagnose rare diseases, more quickly and with fewer painful tests for patients. The world-leading Moorfields Eye Hospital is working with the world-leading AI company Deepmind.

  1. Their AI system has made the correct diagnosis on over 50 different eye diseases with 94% accuracy – at least matching the best human experts.
  2. And that figure is only going to improve.
  3. These technologies, and other new digital services giving targeted health advice, are starting to transform global medicine.

As it has been with every wave of technology for the last 70 years, the NHS must be at the forefront, embracing these new technologies and shaping them as they evolve and improve. The NHS must go from being the world’s biggest buyer of fax machines to the tech pioneers of the future.

  • From 1796 when Edward Jenner developed the first smallpox vaccine, to 1928 when Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin, to 1950 when Richard Doll proved the link between smoking and cancer.
  • The next frontier of prevention is using the data at our disposal to predict who will be ill with what, and to get in there early.
  • The Prime Minister has spoken with great eloquence about the power of artificial intelligence to save lives by spotting cancer earlier – and we must do that.
  • But predictive prevention has a far broader application.

From diagnosing a susceptibility to dementia due to a vitamin deficiency, to motivating activity to tackle obesity, we can have better, more targeted interventions than ever before. Again, giving better results, and helping the NHS eliminate waste and save money.

  1. Our aim is to prevent people becoming patients through personalised advice and intervention.
  2. Public Health England are leading the way on predictive prevention.
  3. They are bringing together a range of experts so we can scale up this pioneering work to a national level.
  4. Now, I’ve talked about acute care, genetics, and choices.

So let’s turn to the final factor in determining a healthy lifespan: the environment. And this is linked to my third and final point: how getting prevention right will transform society for the better. Right now, we tend to think of things in isolation.

Pollution is seen as an environmental problem. Employment is something for the Treasury to worry about. And housing is either a public good or a private investment. But health can’t work in isolation. Our health is affected by each and every one of those. So a true focus on prevention means tackling the environmental factors that affect a person’s health too.

It means a new drive for clean air, building on the successes of recent years in cutting emissions. Secure employment, building on the record number of jobs available now. Higher quality housing. And it also means our GP surgeries, our hospitals, our care homes, our entire health and care system working more closely with local authorities, schools, businesses, charities and all the other parts that make up our communities.

It means employers playing a bigger role in helping their staff stay healthy and to return to health after illness. And we can learn from the excellent work of our military here. Soldiers have an 85% return-to-work rate after a serious injury, and they obviously have some very serious injuries. The equivalent rate for civilians is only 35%.

The reason why the military is better at getting people back to work is because they are more engaged in their workers’ recovery at every stage of the process. Civilian employers must do the same. Employers have a responsibility to help improve the health of their staff and the nation.

  1. To achieve this we need to strengthen the links between employers, their unwell staff, and the NHS.
  2. That way, the challenge – for I never think of people as problems – doesn’t present itself at 3am at A&E.
  3. Good health starts with the right pre-natal care, immunisation, nutritional support, fitness advice, minimising social media and mental health harms, secure employment, financial independence, safe housing, help with bad habits, friends and family to fight loneliness, careful and considered interventions at every stage of life into old age.
  4. From cradle to grave, not just for the NHS, but for the whole of society.

Giving people responsibility for their own health. Empowering them to make the right decisions. The best help when they need help. That is what getting prevention right means. That is the potential of prevention. That is the promise that it offers: a healthier, happier future for us all. : Prevention is better than cure – Matt Hancock’s speech to IANPHI

How is the saying prevention is better than cure?

This page is about the saying “Prevention is better than cure” Possible meaning: It’s better to take care that a problem does not happen than to have to solve the problem afterwards. It’s easier to stop something bad from happening in the first place than to fix the damage after it has happened.

Why is prevention better than cure reasons?

Answer: Prevention is considered as better than cure because it saves us from the harm of curing through medicines. Prevention is a safe way to remain away from any problem. We just need to maintain a healthy and disciplined lifestyle all through life.

What is a good quote on prevention?

‘ An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure ‘ – Benjamin Franklin.

Is prevention better than cure change to positive?

Answer: Superlative :- Prevention is the best. Positive :- Cure is not as good as Prevention (is).

Who first said an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure?

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure Nearly 300 years ago, Benjamin Franklin said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Although he was referring to house fire prevention, this saying is certainly applicable to disease prevention.

The cost of preventing disease is generally far less than the cost of treating disease. According to a January 2020 Commonwealth Fund report, the U.S. spends more per person on health care than on any other part of the economy and spends more than any other developed country, including Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

In 2020, U.S. health care spending rose to $4.1 trillion. A large part of this spending is on preventable conditions, emergency room visits and hospitalizations. The Commonwealth Fund states that the U.S. has the highest chronic disease burden, obesity, and avoidable death rate, lowest life expectancy and rate of physician visits, and “has among the highest number of hospitalizations from preventable causes” compared to our peer nations.

  • While these objective health measures are staggering, the human suffering that often accompanies preventable conditions is immeasurable.
  • For years, I practiced as a registered nurse in the hospital and cared for patients who experienced heart attacks, strokes and other preventable conditions.
  • It saddened me knowing that many of these hospitalizations could have been prevented.

Healthy lifestyles, including diets full of vegetables, fruits and whole grains, regular physical activity, avoiding smoking, and limiting alcohol, is often the best way to prevent disease. Stress management, sleep, healthy recreation and positive social connections are also important aspects of balanced, holistic health.

Another important preventive step is health monitoring through regular primary care check-ups. Primary care providers can monitor simple health measures such as weight, body mass index, blood pressure (BP), and other tests to check for early signs of disease. Conditions like high BP (hypertension) and diabetes mellitus, particularly when combined with smoking, excess alcohol and being overweight, can lead to stroke, heart and kidney diseases and vision loss.

Heart disease can lead to heart attacks and heart failure, strokes can lead to permanent brain damage and loss of the normal ability to walk, move, speak and/or swallow, and kidney disease can lead to the need for hours of dialysis on multiple days of the week, and all of these conditions can lead to hospitalization and early death.

Since 2014, the University of Hawaii at Hilo School of Nursing has collaborated with Community First and Big Island schools on an annual Know Your Numbers Educators project. Senior UH-Hilo nursing students provide sixth-graders with education about the importance of BP monitoring, factors that can lead to hypertension, and the health consequences of hypertension such as stroke, heart and kidney disease.

You might be interested:  Pain Clinics Near Me

They are also taught how to correctly measure an adult BP. The students then take BP cuffs home to measure adult family members’ BPs and provide BP education. From 2014 to 2021, 831 sixth-graders have participated in the Know Your Numbers Educators project and have taken over 4,480 BP measurements.

  • By educating youth who share the information learned with their families, the UH-Hilo School of Nursing and Community First hope to raise awareness about the dangers of hypertension, the importance of BP monitoring, and help community members prevent or identify hypertension earlier. Dr.
  • Patricia Hensley, DNP, RN, is an assistant professor of nursing at UH-Hilo School of Nursing.

Community First is a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit founded by the late Barry Taniguchi in 2014 to serve as a neutral forum for the community to come together, and as a catalyst for solutions to improve health and access to health care. : An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

What is the old saying about prevention?

Ounce of prevention, pound of cure Benjamin Franklin famously advised fire-threatened Philadelphians in 1736 that “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Clearly, preventing fires is better than fighting them, but to what extent can we protect ourselves from natural disasters? Hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, hurricanes and volcanic eruptions are not in themselves preventable, but some of their devastating effects could be reduced through forward planning.

  1. It’s important to be able to recover resiliently from disasters and, as part of this, it’s vital to identify the vulnerabilities of communities living in hazard-prone regions,” explained Michael Ramage from the Centre for Risk in the Built Environment (CURBE).
  2. By putting resources into resilience and building back better, communities can reduce the risk of disastrous consequences should a similar event reoccur.” Now, thanks to an information system that Cambridge researchers developed originally for tracking how regions recover from disasters, communities could soon have the means to understand how best to protect themselves from future catastrophes.

The story begins in Haiti, where CURBE researcher Daniel Brown has been working over the past year with the British Red Cross and the United Nations following the devastating earthquake in 2010, which killed 316,000, displaced 1.3 million and destroyed almost 100,000 houses.

In a country that was deeply impoverished before the earthquake, people continue to live under tarpaulins exposed to safety and security risks, with limited access to water, livelihoods and key services. Brown travelled to the country to field-test a system that he and colleagues at Cambridge Architectural Research (CAR) and ImageCat had developed during the previous four years as a mapping technique for tracking post-disaster recovery.

With funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Brown had identified a suite of 12 ‘performance indicators’ spanning core recovery sectors extracted from high-resolution satellite imagery. He used these to map the recovery process in Ban Nam Khem, Thailand, after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and Muzaffarabad, Pakistan, after the 2005 Kashmir earthquake, by looking at aspects such as the movement of populations, the construction of dwellings, the accessibility of roads, and the loss and rebuilding of livelihoods.

  1. In Thailand and Pakistan, the system had already proved to be extremely useful.
  2. Brown’s work provided data and results that assisted decision making and had the potential to ensure the recovery process was both transparent and accountable.
  3. In Haiti, the EPSRC-funded follow-on project aimed to fine-tune the performance indicators within operational situations to suit the workflow of aid agencies.

What Brown found, however, was that in the complex and dynamic situation that follows a disaster, agencies desperately needed a real-time system to help them decide where to put resources. “Many of the hundreds of maps produced within the first week of the Haiti earthquake were soon out of date because of the changeability of the situation,” he explained.

There was also a massive duplication of effort, with agencies often lacking trained staff to ensure the right information about buildings and people was acquired at the right time.” Dr Stephen Platt, Chairman of CAR, who has also been working on the project, described how these findings confirmed the results of a survey the team had previously carried out: “Agencies told us that they lack coordinated mapping information on where displaced populations have gone and where they have begun to return to, as well as damage to livelihoods, and rehabilitation of homes and infrastructure.

It’s very hard for them to decide where to put funds to the best effect for positive and resilient change.” Brown’s first task was a remote analysis of the affected area from his office in Cambridge, using pre-disaster satellite imagery together with a new technique based on high-resolution oblique aerial photographs that capture views of the façade of buildings, and Lidar, which measures building height.

On his arrival in Haiti, he identified which of the performance indicators was relevant for planning and used these to gather field information on the state of buildings, the socioeconomic impact on people, the safest places to rebuild and the community’s views. All data were integrated into a single database to aid the design of a rebuilding programme.

“We were delighted to find that the information system can be used for all phases of the disaster cycle, from preparedness through to damage assessment, then planning and finally recovery monitoring. You could think of each phase comprising a single module in the database.

  1. All these phases are effectively interrelated with each other – data produced during one phase can be used in another phase.
  2. So when we collected damage data, these could be used as a baseline to inform planning, and so on,” explained Brown.
  3. Ramage, Principal Investigator for the follow-on project, added: “You can see how a system that can be used to predict where future vulnerabilities might be in a community is so important.

And, through Steve’s work in New Zealand, Chile and Italy, we have learnt more about how governments and agencies in developed countries are currently responding to disasters, which has allowed us to learn more about how our system and ideas might be adapted for different contexts.”

Echoing this, Dr Emily So, Director of CURBE, explained how the project fitted into what’s been called the disaster management cycle: “Governments and agencies think in terms of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.What we are trying to do in our research – which builds on 25 years of work in this area in the Department of Architecture under the leadership of Professor Robin Spence – is to make sure that we not only do reactive groundwork after the disaster but also proactive work, to mitigate and prepare ahead of the event and reduce the risk of disaster.”The team has recently been awarded funding for a two-year project involving eight global institutions with the remit of using satellite remote sensing to understand risk and vulnerabilities in communities around the world, under the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme.

“The hazard itself is not what creates the disaster,” added So. “It’s the quality of the housing and the social fabric. This is where CURBE can help in terms of assessing exposure and proposing methods of evaluating it. Better information means better ideas, means better protection.” For more information, please contact Louise Walsh () at the University of Cambridge Office of External Affairs and Communications.

What’s life without risk quotes?

‘ Life without risks is not worth living.’ – Charles A. Lindbergh | Best success quotes, Fly quotes, Success quotes business.

What is the biggest risk quote?

The biggest risk is not taking any risk In a world that is changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.

What is Robert Morris famous quote?

(?) Quotes are added by the Goodreads community and are not verified by Goodreads. (Learn more) Showing 1-17 of 17 “Negativity is simply the devil’s language spoken by those who have his perspective.” God’s language is faith. Nothing is impossible with God (see Matt.19:26).

God never speaks negatively. He speaks truth. Even when He speaks truth, He speaks it by faith, because He sees what can happen. Faith doesn’t mean that you don’t see the problem. Faith means you can see past the problem to the answer. You’re not saying, “There is no problem.” You’re saying, “There is an answer!” By” ― Robert Morris, The Power of Your Words: How God Can Bless Your Life Through the Words You Speak “I was saved in a shabby little motel room.

Of course, you don’t have to be in a church to be saved. After all, you’re probably not going to die in a funeral home. It’s convent if you do, but it probably won’t happen.” ― Robert Morris “Satan will do everything he can to discourage you from expressing gratitude and praise.

  • Frankly, he wants you to be a grumbler.
  • Why? Because grumbling is an expression of unbelief and ingratitude (two big ways to short-circuit God’s power in your life).
  • Praise, on the other hand, is an expression of faith and gratitude.
  • Yes,” ― Robert Morris, The Power of Your Words: How God Can Bless Your Life Through the Words You Speak “leaping, and praising God.

(Acts 3:6–8) This day was different because of the gift of healings imparted by the Holy Spirit poured out upon Peter and his fellow followers of Jesus. Has the HOLY SPIRIT gone out of BUSINESS, or is He on extended VACATION? Some people question whether the Holy Spirit still gives this gift.

  • So I ask, has the” ― Robert Morris, The God I Never Knew: How Real Friendship with the Holy Spirit Can Change Your Life “It is important to remember that anytime you feel the need to begin a conversation with the words, “I probably shouldn’t tell you this, but,
  • It’s almost always a conversation that shouldn’t happen at all.

So, if you feel the need to say, “I probably shouldn’t say this,,” then DON’T! Just hush. That little nudge you are feeling is probably the Holy Spirit saying, “Don’t go there. You’re going to regret the words you’re about to speak.” Or as King David wrote, “Muzzle it!” I” ― Robert Morris, The Power of Your Words: How God Can Bless Your Life Through the Words You Speak “There’s no greater adventure on earth than simply living the life of generosity and abundance that is available to all of God’s people—but that so few ever dare to live.

  • It is a journey of reward.
  • It is the blessed life.” ― Robert Morris, Generous Life Journey “When we have a job change or we’re buying a new home or we have an important decision to make concerning our marriage or family or future, we want a specific word from the Lord.
  • And we need one from Him too.
  • And He will give us one.

But my concern is that we sometimes try to hear a specific word from God without first developing the habit of hearing a general word from God every day. That’s an important part of the process of learning to value God’s voice. If we just check in with God every six months or so whenever a big decision comes up, then we will miss out not only on knowing God’s general will but also on a close, everyday friendship with God.

So we must learn to value His voice, His general voice, on a regular basis if we want to hear His specific voice from time to time. If we’re not in the habit of meeting with Him and hearing from Him on a regular basis, then it will be much more difficult to hear a specific word from God.” ― Robert Morris “Materialism takes a good thing that God gives us and makes it an ultimate thing.

It attaches our self-worth to our net worth. It actually stunts and even destroys our spiritual lives. It wrenches our focus away from God and places it on objects. It blinds us to the curses of wealth. And it invariably ends in futility. It will never lead to true joy and fulfillment.

  • Those blessings can only come from relationship with God and becoming the person He created you to be for His purposes.
  • The spirit of materialism leaves us miserable, alienated from others, and separated from God—alone in every way.” ― Robert Morris, Beyond Blessed: God’s Perfect Plan to Overcome All Financial Stress “Oh, yes, you can sin with your tongue! David knew this and took special steps to keep himself from that kind of sin.
You might be interested:  Intention To Treat

He knew how serious God is about the damage and destruction the tongue can do. He obviously passed this knowledge along to his son, Solomon, because in Proverbs 6, Solomon wrote: These six” ― Robert Morris, The Power of Your Words: How God Can Bless Your Life Through the Words You Speak Welcome back.

What is a famous quote by Louis Pasteur?

Whether our efforts are, or not, favored by life, let us be able to say, when we come near to the great goal, I have done what I could.

What did Hippocrates say about treating disease?

Mental Care Interventions and Art Therapy – The first classification of mental disorders proposed by Hippocrates was: Mania, Melancholy, Phrenitis, Insanity, Disobedience, Paranoia, Panic, Epilepsy and Hysteria. Some of these terms are still used today ( 22 ).

  • Psychological and mental illnesses were viewed as the effect of nature on man and were treated like other diseases.
  • Hippocrates argued that the brain is the organ responsible for mental illnesses and that intelligence and sensitivity reach the brain through the mouth by breathing.
  • Hippocrates believed that mental illnesses can be treated more effectively if they are handled in a similar manner to physical medical conditions ( 23 ).

According to Hippocrates, the diagnosis and treatment of mental and physical diseases is based on observation, consideration of the causes, balance of theory and on the four liquids, blood, phlegm, yellow bile and black bile ( 22 ). Interestingly, Plato’s theory mentions that the healing of body and soul may be either true or false, and medicine and gymnastics are classified as true treatments while in true healing of the soul we have the legislative and the judiciary.

The role of music and theater in the treatment of physical and mental illnesses and the improvement of human behavior was essential. It was believed that healing the soul through music also healed the body, and there were specific musical applications for certain diseases. For instance, the alternating sound of the flute and harp served as a treatment for gout.

Asclepius was the first to apply music as therapy to conquer “passion” ( 24 ). Aristotle claims that in some, the effect of religious melodies that thrill the soul resembles those who have undergone medical treatment and mental catharsis ( 25 ). The ancient tragedies acted as psychotherapy for patients ( 26 ).

The Theater of Epidaurus at the Ancient Temple of Epidaurus was the place where “catharsis” or the release of emotions through performance took place. Moreover, “quiet rooms” were designed in which patients would go to sleep so that they could dream of being mentally healthy, and it was believed that this would help them to improve their mental health ( 27 ).

The concept of “physis” was first proposed by Hippocrates, who changed hieratic or theocratic medicine into a rational discipline. The basic structure of the Asclepieion in Kos points to the fact that Hippocrates believed in a holistic health care model, and in his school science met with drug therapy, diets, and physical and mental exercise, as well as divine solicitation ( 28 ).

Who is Joseph Campbell quotes?

We must let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the one that is waiting for us. Find a place inside where there’s joy, and the joy will burn out the pain. The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are.

Did Ben Franklin say an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure?

Ounce of prevention, pound of cure Benjamin Franklin famously advised fire-threatened Philadelphians in 1736 that “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Clearly, preventing fires is better than fighting them, but to what extent can we protect ourselves from natural disasters? Hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, hurricanes and volcanic eruptions are not in themselves preventable, but some of their devastating effects could be reduced through forward planning.

  • It’s important to be able to recover resiliently from disasters and, as part of this, it’s vital to identify the vulnerabilities of communities living in hazard-prone regions,” explained Michael Ramage from the Centre for Risk in the Built Environment (CURBE).
  • By putting resources into resilience and building back better, communities can reduce the risk of disastrous consequences should a similar event reoccur.” Now, thanks to an information system that Cambridge researchers developed originally for tracking how regions recover from disasters, communities could soon have the means to understand how best to protect themselves from future catastrophes.

The story begins in Haiti, where CURBE researcher Daniel Brown has been working over the past year with the British Red Cross and the United Nations following the devastating earthquake in 2010, which killed 316,000, displaced 1.3 million and destroyed almost 100,000 houses.

  1. In a country that was deeply impoverished before the earthquake, people continue to live under tarpaulins exposed to safety and security risks, with limited access to water, livelihoods and key services.
  2. Brown travelled to the country to field-test a system that he and colleagues at Cambridge Architectural Research (CAR) and ImageCat had developed during the previous four years as a mapping technique for tracking post-disaster recovery.

With funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Brown had identified a suite of 12 ‘performance indicators’ spanning core recovery sectors extracted from high-resolution satellite imagery. He used these to map the recovery process in Ban Nam Khem, Thailand, after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and Muzaffarabad, Pakistan, after the 2005 Kashmir earthquake, by looking at aspects such as the movement of populations, the construction of dwellings, the accessibility of roads, and the loss and rebuilding of livelihoods.

  1. In Thailand and Pakistan, the system had already proved to be extremely useful.
  2. Brown’s work provided data and results that assisted decision making and had the potential to ensure the recovery process was both transparent and accountable.
  3. In Haiti, the EPSRC-funded follow-on project aimed to fine-tune the performance indicators within operational situations to suit the workflow of aid agencies.

What Brown found, however, was that in the complex and dynamic situation that follows a disaster, agencies desperately needed a real-time system to help them decide where to put resources. “Many of the hundreds of maps produced within the first week of the Haiti earthquake were soon out of date because of the changeability of the situation,” he explained.

“There was also a massive duplication of effort, with agencies often lacking trained staff to ensure the right information about buildings and people was acquired at the right time.” Dr Stephen Platt, Chairman of CAR, who has also been working on the project, described how these findings confirmed the results of a survey the team had previously carried out: “Agencies told us that they lack coordinated mapping information on where displaced populations have gone and where they have begun to return to, as well as damage to livelihoods, and rehabilitation of homes and infrastructure.

It’s very hard for them to decide where to put funds to the best effect for positive and resilient change.” Brown’s first task was a remote analysis of the affected area from his office in Cambridge, using pre-disaster satellite imagery together with a new technique based on high-resolution oblique aerial photographs that capture views of the façade of buildings, and Lidar, which measures building height.

On his arrival in Haiti, he identified which of the performance indicators was relevant for planning and used these to gather field information on the state of buildings, the socioeconomic impact on people, the safest places to rebuild and the community’s views. All data were integrated into a single database to aid the design of a rebuilding programme.

“We were delighted to find that the information system can be used for all phases of the disaster cycle, from preparedness through to damage assessment, then planning and finally recovery monitoring. You could think of each phase comprising a single module in the database.

  • All these phases are effectively interrelated with each other – data produced during one phase can be used in another phase.
  • So when we collected damage data, these could be used as a baseline to inform planning, and so on,” explained Brown.
  • Ramage, Principal Investigator for the follow-on project, added: “You can see how a system that can be used to predict where future vulnerabilities might be in a community is so important.

And, through Steve’s work in New Zealand, Chile and Italy, we have learnt more about how governments and agencies in developed countries are currently responding to disasters, which has allowed us to learn more about how our system and ideas might be adapted for different contexts.”

Echoing this, Dr Emily So, Director of CURBE, explained how the project fitted into what’s been called the disaster management cycle: “Governments and agencies think in terms of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.What we are trying to do in our research – which builds on 25 years of work in this area in the Department of Architecture under the leadership of Professor Robin Spence – is to make sure that we not only do reactive groundwork after the disaster but also proactive work, to mitigate and prepare ahead of the event and reduce the risk of disaster.”The team has recently been awarded funding for a two-year project involving eight global institutions with the remit of using satellite remote sensing to understand risk and vulnerabilities in communities around the world, under the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme.

“The hazard itself is not what creates the disaster,” added So. “It’s the quality of the housing and the social fabric. This is where CURBE can help in terms of assessing exposure and proposing methods of evaluating it. Better information means better ideas, means better protection.” For more information, please contact Louise Walsh () at the University of Cambridge Office of External Affairs and Communications.