Ragas And Cure

0 Comments

Ragas And Cure

Which raga cures which diseases?

Ragas that Heal – Hindu philosophy gives us an insight into the feeling nature of music and how deeply the human spirit affects and is affected by the outcome of a performance. Shyamali Sharma, a performing sitar artist and music therapist of many years says, I can certainly attest to the fact that your personal feelings are projected on the audience tremendously, so much so that if you are upset, you should not play because everyone listening to your performance will be affected by your emotion.

  1. If you are overwhelmed with happiness, so will they be.
  2. There are 72 raagas, which are known as the Melakarta ragas (Parant raagas) from which other ragas known as the Janya ragas are obtained.
  3. Neural research proves that 72 raagas can control 72 nerves in the human body.
  4. Singing or performing a Raga, when bound to its specifications ( lakshanas ) and with purity in pitch ( swara shuddi ) gives the performer complete control on the corresponding nerve.

Ragas Ahirbhairav and Todi are prescribed for patients suffering from hypertension. Carnatic ragas like Punnagavarali and Sahana are useful to calm the mind and control anger. Ragas used in Music Therapy

Raga Treatment
Todi, Bhupali, Ahir Bhairav Provides relief from cold and headache, high blood pressure
Shivaranjani Treats memory problems
Bhairavi Provides relief from Sinus, cold, phlegm, toothache
Chandrakauns Treatment of heart ailments and diabetes
Darbari Kanara Eases tension and provides relaxation
Bihag and Bahar For sound, sonorous sleep
Darbari Relief from tension
Malkauns, Asavari Cures low blood pressure
Tilak-kamod, Hansdhwani, Kalavati, Durga Easing tension

Table 1: Source: International Journal of Innovation, Management and Technology, Vol.2, No.1, February, 2011 ISSN: 2010-024856 Hindustani and Carnatic classical musical considers a Raga as depicting a specific mood. An appropriate mood has to be evoked in the listeners mind before initiating musical treatment.

  1. For example, Kafi Raga evokes a humid, cool, soothing and deep mood while Raga Pooriya Dhanasri evokes a sweet, deep, heavy, cloudy and stable state of mind.
  2. Raga Mishra Mand has a very pleasing, refreshing, light and sweet touch while Bageshwari arouses a feeling of stability, depth and calmness.
  3. Ragas do heal when rendered properly, at the right pitch ( saptak ), with the true vaadis and samvaadis brought forth, and at the correct prahar (time).

Even a single swar/note has immense strength. Stuti, a sitar player in the US is suffering from a heart condition. She says, I mainly use my sitar for meditation as I find the sound of the instrument bringing healing to me. I take the sitar to parks and beaches out in hot or cold weather as I need the serenity of its sound because of my heart condition.

  • Another musician of the Jaipur gharana who recently bought a rudra veena writes, I have noticed great cardiac as well as psychological benefits from playing my recently purchased Indian classical instrument.
  • I’m impressed by an often overlooked aspect (healing aspect) of Indian classical music.
  • True intelligence resides in the heart.

i Sources Cite this Article Medindia adheres to strict ethical publishing standards to provide accurate, relevant, and current health content. We source our material from reputable places such as peer-reviewed journals, academic institutions, research bodies, medical associations, and occasionally, non-profit organizations.

  1. Bagchi, K. (Ed.) Music, Mind and Mental Health, New Delhi: Society for Gerontological Research
  2. Crandall, J.1986 Self-transformation through Music, NewDelhi: New Age
  3. Sairam, T.V.2004 a. Medicinal Music, Chennai: Nada Centre for Music Therapy
  4. Sairam T.V.2004 b. Raga Therapy, Chennai: Nada Centre for Music Therapy

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA Lakshmi Gopal. (2018, November 23). Ragas That Heal, Medindia. Retrieved on Jun 29, 2023 from https://www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/raga-therapy-for-healing-mind-and-body-healing-ragas.htm.
  • MLA Lakshmi Gopal. “Ragas That Heal”. Medindia, Jun 29, 2023.,
  • Chicago Lakshmi Gopal. “Ragas That Heal”. Medindia. https://www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/raga-therapy-for-healing-mind-and-body-healing-ragas.htm. (accessed Jun 29, 2023).
  • Harvard Lakshmi Gopal.2018. Ragas That Heal, Medindia, viewed Jun 29, 2023, https://www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/raga-therapy-for-healing-mind-and-body-healing-ragas.htm.

Why are raga called healing therapy?

Raga therapy, a practice that follows a series of selected notes, known as Ragas, which evoke the emotions required to heal and calm the body and mind. This therapy heavily contributes to the psychological, sociological and academic improvement.

Which raag is good for health?

International Music Day is celebrated on the 21st of June every year. Dr. Balaji Kirushnan shares the health benefits of music as his tribute to music lovers. Music therapy is an established health profession in which music is used as a therapeutic treatment to address the physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs of individuals. The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior positively is as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato.

  • The 20th century discipline began after World War I and World War II when community musicians, both amateurs and professionals, went to veterans’ hospitals around the country to play for the thousands of veterans who were suffering both physical and emotional trauma from the wars.
  • Carnatic music is deeply rooted in the cultural system of India.

The role of Carnatic music in aiding and curing diseases is well-known. Ragas are a fundamental concept in Carnatic music. It means colour in Sanskrit. Ragas are combinations of various notes or swaras, which give a particular sequence. All compositions that we hear in a concert have various ragas, which give colour to the listeners and lighten their mood.

  1. There are 72 melakartha ragas or parent ragas and more than a 100 janya ragas which are derived from them.
  2. Ragas can also be classified based on the time of the day i.e.
  3. Morning ragas like Bhoopalam and Bowli, afternoon ragas like Bhimpalasi and Brindavani Sarang, evening ragas like Hamir Kalyani and Durga and night ragas like Kurunji and Nilambari to name a few.

Ragas are known to stimulate certain areas of the brain to release endorphins, the happiness hormones, which elevate a person’s mood. A feeling of sadness is invoked by ragas like Shubhapanthuvarali and Sivaranjani whereas ragas like Mohanam and Kadanakuthukalam invoke happiness.

  • The Indian Journal of Surgery published a study in 2012, which said that exposure to the raga Ananda Bhairavi showed a positive effect in postoperative pain management.
  • This was evidenced by a reduction of 50% in the analgesic requirement for those who listened to the raga postoperatively for three days.

In another study by Dr Subramanian, 40 patients were divided into two groups. Both groups received pharmacological treatment as per standard protocols prescribed by psychiatrists. While 20 patients were advised to listen to Shankarabharanam for 15-20 minutes twice a day for a month, the remaining 20 were asked to listen to Kalyanavasantam for a similar time period.

Acidity: Raga Puriya Dhanashri is known to have positive effects in treating acidity and it also promotes a happy disposition. Diabetes and Hypertension: Raga Bageshri calms the mind and promotes mental strength. This raga has been found to help control hypertension. Easing Tension: Raga Darbari has been proven to be effective in reducing the stress levels of individuals. Its composition is attributed to Tansen, who composed it to calm Emperor Akbar after a stressful day. BP Reduction: Raga Todi is effective in bringing down high blood pressure levels. Raga Ahir-Bhairav also does the same. Hypotension: Raga Malkauns is helpful in treating patients who have very low blood pressure levels. Tuberculosis, cancer, cold, sinusitis and toothache: Raga Bhairavi has been known to help patients suffering from these diseases. Asthma and Sun-Stroke: Raga Malhar has shown good results in treating asthma patients. Cold and Headache: A persistent headache and cold are effectively controlled by Raga Todi, Blood Purification: Ragas Hindolam and Marva help cleanse the blood.

Dr. Balaji Kirushnan Consultant Nephrologist Kauvery Hospital, Chennai

Which is the most powerful raga?

History – Bhairav raga is an ancient raga that is considered to be extremely old and originated many centuries ago. The origin of Bhairav raga is disputed. According to some musicians, Bhairav raga was the first raga that originated from the mouth of Lord Shiva,

  1. While some musicians argue that Bhairav raga originated from the mouth of Lord Surya.
  2. This is why it was sung in the daytime.
  3. Bhairava is one of the names of Shiva especially in his powerful form as a naked ascetic with matted locks and body smeared with ashes.
  4. The ragas too have some of these masculine and ascetic attributes in their form and compositions.

The Bhairav raga itself is extremely vast and allows a huge number of note combinations and a great range of emotional qualities from valor to peace. There are many variations based on it including (but not restricted to) Ahir Bhairav, Alam Bhairav, Anand Bhairav, Bairagi Bhairav, Mohini Bhairav Beehad Bhairav, Bhavmat Bhairav, Devata Bhairav, Gauri Bhairav, Hijaz Bhairav, Shivmat Bhairav, Nat Bhairav, Bibhas, Ramkali, Gunkali, Zeelaf, Jogiya (raga), Saurashtra Bhairav, Bangal Bhairav, Komal Bhairav, Mangal Bhairav, Kaushi Bhairav, Bhatiyari Bhairav, Beehad Bhairav, Virat Bhairav, Kabiri Bhairav, Prabhat Bhairav, Roopkali, Bakula Bhairav, Hussaini Bhairav, Kalingda, Devaranjani, Asa Bhairav, Jaun Bhairav, and Bhairav.

Which raag is best for brain?

ABSTRACT: Ragas like khamaj and pooriya are found to help in defusing mental tension, particularly in the case of hysterics. Raga malhar Pacifies anger, excessive mental, excitement & mental instability.

Which raag is for brain?

Analysis of Classical Raaga Bhoopali and Its Influence on Human Brain Waves

International Journal of Engineering Trends and Technology (IJETT)
© 2018 by IJETT Journal
Volume-61 Number-3
Year of Publication : 2018
Aashish.A.Bardekar
DOI : 10.14445/22315381/IJETT-V61P221

Citation MLA Style: Aashish.A.Bardekar “Analysis of Classical Raaga Bhoopali and Its Influence on Human Brain Waves” International Journal of Engineering Trends and Technology 61.3 (2018): 127-132. APA Style: Aashish.A.Bardekar, (2018). Analysis of Classical Raaga Bhoopali and Its Influence on Human Brain Waves.

International Journal of Engineering Trends and Technology, 61(3), 127-132. Abstract India is having rich heritage in music. our classical musical maestros understands and recognizes, ragas emotional influences on human being by changing the resonance of human body. Ragas like darbari and khamaj are found to defuse mental tension, particularly in the case of hysterics.

Raga malhar pacifies anger, excessive mental, excitement & mental instability, Raga jaijaivanti have also been pound effective in curing mental disorders and calming the mind. Although it is require to verify this raga correlation systematically. By survey, it has been seen that no schemes have demonstrated yet.

  • The proposed research presented in this paper is aimed to discover the science behind phonetics of raga and its effects on nerve system.
  • This research is one step to explore scientifically the ancient way of alternative medicine i.e.
  • Raga therapy, which is a need of the day since current advances in technology and rising workload on human being is accompanied by stress relating to mental disorders.

This research focuses on to study the influence of Indian classical ragas structure on human body while person is listening and experiencing an emotion in it by capturing EEG signals. The brainwave signals database will be collected and analyze. This research work addresses these objectives and aims to present a strong case which will help medical practitioners like psychiatrist, to treat patient by injecting music stimulus.

Reference www.ragatherapy.blogspot.in. www.samuelmcclelland.com/files/raga and rasa.pdf. Alicja Wieczorkowska1,Ashoke kumar Datta 2,Ranjan Sengupta 2,Nityananda Dey 2 and Bhaswati mukherji 3, “On Search for Emotion in Hindustani Vocal Music”,1Multimedia Department, Polish,JapaneseInstituteofinformationTechnology,Warsaw,Poland,2Scientific Research academy, Kolkata, India,3 Center for Development of Advanced Computing,Kolkata,India.

Parag Chordia and Alex Rae, “Understanding Emotion in Raag:An Empirical Study of Listener Responses”, Georgia institute of Technology, Department of Music, Atlanta. Shivani yardi,Elaine chew,Giving ragas the Time of day: Linking structure, emotion and performance time in North Indian classical Music using the Harmonic network, University of California,Viterbi school of Engineering, Integrated Media systems center, Proceedings of the 8th International conference on music perception & cognition,Evanston,IL,2004.

www.ragopedia.com/raga/playtime.html. Shankarsanyal1, Archi Banerjee1, Tarit guhathakurta11,Ranjan sengupta1,dipak ghosh1 and partha ghose2,” “EEG study on the Neural Patterns of Brain with Music stimuli: An Evidence of Hysteresis?”,1 Sir C.V,Raman centre for physics and music,Kolkata Centre for Astro particle physics and space science(CAPPS), Bose Institute, Kolkata,”Proceedings International Seminar on „Creating & Teaching Music Patterns,16-18Dec 2013.

Real Time Raga Detection and analysis using computer,physics of carnatic music chapter2, /bitstream/10603/3751/8/08 chapter02. Pdf, http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in. Rolin McCarty, MA, BobBarrio schoplin, phd, Mike Atkinson, and Dana Tomasino,BA,Tension,and mental clarity,”the effects of music on mood,tension and mental clarity”,The Effects of Different Types of Music on mood” Alternate Therepies, January 1998,vol 4.no.1.

  • Www,serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange /node 333.
  • Onstantino striochidis#1, and Emmaneul Bigand,#2, dept of music research, cananda,# dept of cognitive psychology, france, “EEG based emotion perception during music listening”, Proceedings of the 12th International conference on music perception and 8th Triennial conference of the European society for the cognitive sciences of music,july23-28,2012,greece.

Scott Mkeig, Grace Leslie, Tim Mullen, Devpratim Sarma,Nima Bigdely – Shamlo,and Christian kothe,”First demonstration of a musical emotion BCI”, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011,swartz center for computational neuroscience, institute for neural computation, university of California san diego,USA.

Teacher guide.”Music of india”, The Weil Music Institute at Carnegie hall. Daniela Sammler, Maren Grigutsch, Thomas Fritz, and Stefan Koelsch, “Music and emotion: Electrophysiological correlates of the processing of pleasant and unpleasant music”, Psychophysiology, 44 (2007), 293–304. Blackwell Publishing Inc.

Printed in the USA.Z.khalili,M.H.Moradi, “Emotion detection using brain and peripheral signals”, Biomedical Engineering Faculty, Amir kabir University of Technology, Teran, Iran, Proceedings of the 2008IEEE. Dr.K. Adalarasu,M. Jagannath, S.Naidukeerthig a ramesh,B.Geethanjali,” A Review on influence of music on brain activity using signal processing and Imaging system”, International journal of engineering&Technology(IJEST),ISSN:0975-5462,vol.3 no.4 Apr 2011 L.J.Trainor and L.A.Schmidt,” Processing Emotions Induced by Music”,chapter 20.

Which raag is for mental health?

Effect of Traditional Raga Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Level in Preoperative Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgeries Achar A, Talwar B, Kumar A, Addanki PS

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021 | Volume : 7 | Issue : 3 | Page : 251-253

/td>

Effect of Traditional Raga Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Level in Preoperative Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgeries 1, 1, 2, 3 1 Department of Ophthalmology, Kanachur Institute of Medical Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore, Karnataka, India 2 Department of ENT, Kanachur Institute of Medical Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore, Karnataka, India 3 Department of Physiology, Mamata Medical College, Khammam, Telangana, India

Date of Submission 28-Jul-2021
Date of Decision 30-Oct-2021
Date of Acceptance 08-Nov-2021
Date of Web Publication 24-Dec-2021

table>

ul>

  • Correspondence Address :Dr. Ashok KumarDepartment of ENT, Kanachur Institute of Medical Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore 575018, Karnataka India
  • Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None
  • DOI: 10.4103/mamcjms.mamcjms_89_21 Background: Psychologic behavior plays a key role in the outcome of any treatment or therapy. It was recommended to assess the psychologic status of the patient along with the clinical examination and also counsel him with adequate management therapies.

    1. Ragas have a high impact on mental well-being.
    2. Listening to ragas was reported to be highly effective in regulating the blood pressure and heart rate.
    3. Methods: The present study involved 30 (10 males and 20 females) preoperative patients who will be undergoing cataract surgery in 2 days and within the age group of 55 to 60 years from the ophthalmology department.

    The patients were subjected to listen to Raga Bhairavi for 30 minutes for 2 days. Results: There is a significant decrease in depression anxiety and stress levels followed by raga therapy. Conclusion: There is a significant decrease in depression anxiety and stress levels followed by raga therapy.

    How to cite this article: Achar A, Talwar B, Kumar A, Addanki PS. Effect of Traditional Raga Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Level in Preoperative Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgeries. MAMC J Med Sci 2021;7:251-3

    table>

    How to cite this URL: Achar A, Talwar B, Kumar A, Addanki PS. Effect of Traditional Raga Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Level in Preoperative Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgeries. MAMC J Med Sci 2021 ;7:251-3. Available from:

    Psychologic behavior plays a key role in the outcome of any treatment or therapy. It was recommended to assess the psychologic status of the patient along with the clinical examination and also counsel him with adequate management therapies. This not only relieves the stress but also improves the outcome of the treatment.

    Patients become stress when they were explained about the surgical process. Excessive stress will have an adverse effect on an outcome. Stress raises blood pressure and it is mandated to regulate blood pressure before the surgery. Pharmacologic treatment is effective but involved side effects and cannot prescribe long-term use.

    , Hence, the present study used traditional music for the management of stress in patients. Ragas have a high impact on mental well-being. Listening to ragas was reported to be highly effective in regulating blood pressure and heart rate. This effect may be due to the effect on sympathetic and vagal systems.

    • Ragas were found to be very powerful in the Indian context.
    • It was proven that there are certain ragas by which person can control the nature such as make the clouds to rain.
    • Listening to ragas on regular basis is very helpful as it can activate all the chakras in the body.
    • Further, it increases the quality and quantity of life.

    Raga Bhairavi is one of the ancient ragas which is highly effective in the management of mental health problems. Hence, the present study selected the raga for management of depression, anxiety, and stress levels in preoperative patients undergoing cataract surgeries.

    1. Study design: Experimental study
    2. Study setting: The present study was conducted at Kanachur Institute of Medical Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore, Karnataka, India.
    3. Study population
    4. Raga therapy

    The present study involved 30 (10 males and20 females) preoperative patients who will be undergoing cataract surgery in 2 days and within the age group of 55 to 60 years from the ophthalmology department. Both males and females were included in the study.

    • Informed consent was obtained from all the patients before the study.
    • Willing participants were included in the study.
    • Patients with severe complications were excluded from the study.
    • The patients were subjected to listen to Raga Bhairavi for 30 minutes for 2 days.
    • The timing of listening was adjusted to 9 am as per the convenience of patients.

    A standard music system from Philips Company (BTM2180/37 Micro Music System by Philips company, Amsterdam. Netherlands) was used to deliver the music in the ward. Assessment of depression, anxiety, and stress The psychologic parameters were assessed using the DASS 21 scale.

    This is a standardized and free scale to assess negative psychologic emotions such as depression, anxiety, and stress. Ethical consideration The study protocol was approved by an institutional human ethical committee. Informed consent was obtained from all the participants. Confidentiality of data was maintained.

    Data analysis Data were analyzed using SPSS 20.0 version, Student t test was used to assess the significance of the difference between the groups. A probability value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. The results are summarized in, The two-tailed P -value is less than 0.0001 for depression score.

    By conventional criteria, this difference is considered to be extremely statistically significant. The mean of group 1 minus group 2 equals 5.00 (95% confidence interval: 3.37–6.63). The two-tailed P -value is less than 0.0001 for anxiety scores. By conventional criteria, this difference is considered to be extremely statistically significant.

    The mean of group 1 minus group 2 equals 6.00 (95% confidence interval: 3.69–8.31). The two-tailed P -value is less than 0.0001 for the stress score. By conventional criteria, this difference is considered to be extremely statistically significant. The mean of group 1 minus group 2 equals 9.00 (95% confidence interval: 6.55–11.45).

    Table 1 Depression, anxiety, and stress patients before and after interventions

    The present study aimed to observe the effect of raga therapy for the management of depression, anxiety, and stress levels in preoperative patients undergoing cataract surgeries. There is a significant decrease in depression anxiety and stress levels followed by raga therapy.

    The healing effects of raga therapy are well explained. In the Indian context of view, the music was believed to be originated from Vedas that is Samaveda. There was a significant increase in the power of overall alpha, delta, and theta power of EEG waves followed by listening to ragas. Ragas were reported to improve overall health.

    Music therapy influences the cognition, emotional, physiologic functions, and social well-being of an individual. Music influences the cortical network associated with the emotions and regulates emotions. It was reported that listening to music also influences mood.

    Listening to music improves the positive self-image and improves coping skills. Concentration, meditation, and breathing exercises take place simultaneously when singing or listening to music. Music influences relaxation and it is the best to example that baby sleep listening to music. Music has always positive impact on health and disease conditions.

    It was reported that music has used to heal the adolescents who were substance abused. Music also heals the neurodevelopment delays. Music therapy was reported to prevent cognitive decline. Interestingly, music was used in the management of pain and palliative care.

    1. There were structural changes in the front limbic region which is associated with the cognitive and emotional functions followed by music therapy.
    2. The present study results agree with earlier studies as there was a significant reduction in the scores of depression, anxiety, and stress.
    3. There is a significant decrease in depression anxiety and stress levels followed by raga therapy.

    There is a strong need for further studies with multiple centers and a higher sample size to recommend raga therapy in the management of mental health problems in the patients. Financial support and sponsorship Nil. Conflicts of interest There are no conflicts of interest.

    Shalev AY. Posttraumatic stress disorder and stress-related disorders. Psychiatr Clin North Am 2009;32:687-704.
    Jang KL, Thordarson DS, Stein MB, Cohan SL, Taylor S. Coping styles and personality: a biometric analysis. Anxiety Stress Coping 2007;20:17-24.
    Monroe SM. Modern approaches to conceptualizing and measuring human life stress. Annu Rev Clin Psychol 2008;4:33-52.
    Lupien SJ, McEwen BS, Gunnar MR, Heim C. Effects of stress throughout the lifespan on the brain, behavior, and cognition. Nat Rev Neurosci 2009;10:434-45.
    Raj K, Rinchhen CZ, Ringe VV. Stress reduction through listening to Indian classical music during gastroscopy. Diagn Ther Endosc 1989;4:191-7.
    Taylor SE, Stanton AL. Coping resources, coping, processes, and mental health. Annu Rev Clin Psychol 2007;3:377-401.
    Balaji Deekshitulu PV. Stress management for mantra techniques. MOJ Yoga Physical Ther 2017;2:1-4.
    Lovibond SH, Lovibond PF. Manual for the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales.2nd ed. Sydney: Psychology Foundation; 1995.
    Hegde S, Aucouturier JJ, Ramanujam B, Bigand E. Variations in emotional experience during phases of the elaboration of North Indian raga performance. Cambourpoulos E, Tsougras E, Mavromatis P, Pastiadis K. (Editors) Proceedings of 12th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition and the 8th Triennial Conference of the Cognitive Sciences of Music, July 23–28, 2012, pp.412-3.10, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Hegde S. Music-based cognitive remediation therapy for patients with traumatic brain injury. Front Neurol 2014;5:34.
    Zatorre R. Music, the food of neuroscience? Nature 2005;434:312-5.
    Bruscia K. Definindo Musicoterapia, Enelivros.
    Chandrashekaran N. Musical Deficits in Schizophrenia − Its Relation with Deficits in Cognition and Emotion Recognition. MPhil thesis in clinical psychology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India; 2015.
    Sairam TV. Can music replace medicine? Bhavan J 2015;61:64-70.
    Ravi M. Music and spirituality. In: Balodhi JP, ed. Application of Oriental Philosophical Thoughts in Mental Health. Bangalore: NIMHANS Publication 2002. pp.89-98.
    Sambamoorthy P. South Indian Music Book 5.8th ed. Chennai: The Indian Music Publishing House; 2002.
    MacDonald RA. Music, health, and well-being: a review. Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being 2013;8:20635
    Maratos A, Crawford MJ, Procter S. Music therapy for depression: it seems to work, but how? Br J Psychiatry 2011;199:92-3.
    Pasiali V, LaGasse AB, Penn SL. The effect of musical attention control training (MACT) on attention skills of adolescents with neurodevelopmental delays: a pilot study. J Music Ther 2014;51:333-54.
    Guétin S, Giniès P, Siou DK et al. The effects of music intervention in the management of chronic pain: a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Clin J Pain 2012;28:329-37.
    Gutgsell KJ, Schluchter M, Margevicius S et al. Music therapy reduces pain in palliative care patients: a randomized controlled trial. J Pain Symptom Manage 2013;45:822-31.
    Särkämö T, Ripollés P, Vepsäläinen H et al. Structural changes induced by daily music listening in the recovering brain after middle cerebral artery stroke: a voxel-based morphometry study. Front Hum Neurosci 2014;8:245.
    Särkämö T, Tervaniemi M, Laitinen S, Forsblom A, Soinila S, Mikkonen M et al. Music listening enhances cognitive recovery and mood after middle cerebral artery stroke. Brain 2008;131:866-76.

    table>

    table>

    /td>

    Effect of Traditional Raga Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Level in Preoperative Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgeries Achar A, Talwar B, Kumar A, Addanki PS

    Which raag is for depression?

    1. Introduction – Cancer is a wide spectrum of diseases that can originate in almost any organ or tissue of the body due to the uncontrollable growth of abnormal cells invading neighbouring organs and or spread to other organs ( Bray et al., 2018 ). It is the world’s second leading cause of death, and it is a significant impediment to rising life expectancy in any nation ( Bray et al., 2018 ).

    1. Cancer is not a disease that affects patients alone; its physical and psychological impact can be seen in caregivers of patients ( Lambert et al., 2016 ).
    2. When cancer is diagnosed, family members take up the role of caregivers and start to face the associated difficulties ( Silveira et al., 2010 ; Tamayo et al., 2010 ).

    A great burden is associated with caring for those we love, who are suffering from serious illness ( Terakye, 2011 ). This stress can adversely affect caregivers’ and patients’ mental and physical health. An appropriate strategy is required to address the psychological difficulties of caregivers since caregivers’ wide variety of responsibilities becomes a burden when patient’s functional status declines ( Grunfeld et al., 2004 ).

    A meta-analytic study examining the relationship between problems experienced by cancer patients and their caretakers suggests that caregivers’ anguish also influences patients’ distress and vice versa ( Hodges et al., 2005 ). Studies show that a greater degree of behavioural problems in the patient is related to the reduced mental well-being of the caregiver ( Pinquart and Sorensen, 2007 ).

    Research regarding the reciprocal association between the psychiatric condition of the caregiver and the patient found that if the patient meets the requirements for any mental illness, the caregivers are 7.9 times more likely to meet the psychiatric disorder and vice versa ( Bambauer et al., 2006 ).

    1. The caregivers of cancer patients have been diagnosed with psychological issues such as depression, anxiety, and other mental health problems ( Vanderwerker et al., 2005 ).
    2. A significant correlation was found between anxiety issues, sleep disturbances, and somatic symptom presentation ( Dong et al., 2013 ).

    Studies have shown that anxiety is considered a natural psychological reaction to ongoing stress among those who care for cancer patients; it triggers a slew of other psychological problems such as sleep disturbances, especially insomnia, which are common in anxiety disorders ( Staner, 2003 ; Vanderwerker et al., 2005 ).

    1. Depression is another serious psychological issue observed in these caregivers ( Padmaja et al., 2016 ).
    2. These therefore would conflict with their role as caregivers and necessitates further effort.
    3. Therefore, it is vital to provide a suitable intervention for the caregivers and cancer patients, to improve their well-being as well as disease status.

    It is seen that relaxation therapy has become a well-established approach to stress control in recent decades and is useful in diverse cultural settings ( Beason 2009 ). Recent studies have shown music interventions’ effectiveness in promoting relaxation, improving immunity levels, and stress control in cancer patients ( Nilsson et al., 2009 ; Chuang et al., 2010 ; Greenman, 2009 ; Lai et al., 2006 ; Lane, 1992 ).

    • Music therapy gives an effect of relaxation, which helps to increase the well-being of cancer patients caregivers and reduces distress.
    • Music therapy is defined as a systematic process of intervention wherein the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them as dynamic forces of change.

    Experiences with music entail musical interaction, which may be improvised or not. It involves patients playing music, listening to music, or both. Other modes include singing, song writing, and playing instruments to compose music ( Sundar, 2007 ; Rafieyan and Ries, 2007 ).

    It is less known about the soothing mechanism of music, but still, few researches have found there has been a correlation between music and emotional excitement ( Salimpoor et al., 2009 ). Perceptual and emotional processing are the two ways the human brain processes music ( Nizamie and Tikka, 2014 ).

    In perceptual processing, the pitch, intensity, roughness of sound, etc. are perceived by the individual with the help of neural circuitry, whereas in emotional processing brain differentiates between pleasant and unpleasant music with the help of frontal and temporal lobes, respectively ( Boso et al., 2006 ; Lin et al., 2011 ; Blood et al., 1999 ).

    The raga-based approach is used in Indian music therapy very widely. This strategy is calming, attention-enhancing, and can target musical taste and listening habits ( Nizamie and Tikka, 2014 ). Raga Bilahari in Carnatic music is considered perfect for mornings that exude positivity and happiness ( Sarkar and Biswas, 2015 ).

    It relieves fear response, pain sensation, skin diseases, and allergic reactions. Research reveals that using an instrumental and vocal recording of Bilahari raga together helps to alleviate fear, stress, and depression ( Sunitha et al., 2018 ). The bhakti rasa that Bilahari pours out is well recognized.

    The ragas sound lovely and may lift the mood when sung at the appropriate time ( Bhagyalekshmy, 1990 ). The brain’s neocortex is stimulated by the repeating rhythmic features of music, which reduces impulsivity and relaxes people ( Hegde, 2014 ). Though Carnatic raga-Bilahari-based music intervention is found to be a relaxant, improve positivity, reduce anxiety, stress, and depression, its therapeutic effectiveness among the caregivers of cancer patients is less explored.

    Hence, the current study aims to determine the effect of raga-based Carnatic music intervention on anxiety, sleep disturbances, somatic symptoms and distress level of cancer caregivers.

    Which raag is for pain?

    Discussion – Music is a combination of frequency, beat, density, tone, rhythm, repetition, loudness, and lyrics. Different basic personalities tend to be attracted to certain styles of music. Music influences our emotions because it takes the place of and extends our languages.

    Research conducted over the past 10 years has demonstrated that persistent negative emotional experiences or an obsession and preoccupation with negative emotional states can increase one’s likelihood of acquiring the common cold, other viral infections, yeast infestations, hypersensitivities, heart attacks, high blood pressure, and other disease.

    For better personal health, we can then choose “healthful” music and learn to let ourselves benefit from it. The most benefit from music in terms of health is seen for classical and mediation music, whereas heavy metal or techno are ineffective or even dangerous.

    There are many composers that effectively improve quality of life and health, particularly Bach, Mozart, and Italian composers. Various studies have suggested that this music not only makes one happy, but also significantly affects the cardiovascular system and significantly influences heart rate, heart rate variability, and blood pressure.

    Music is effective under different conditions and can be utilized as an effective intervention in patients with cardiovascular disturbances, pain, depressive syndromes, and psychiatric diseases and in intensive care medicine. Therefore, music plays an important role in people’s lives and, by extension, an important role in medicine.

    1. Music therapy is a well-established health service offered in many hospitals in other countries.
    2. In India it has emerged in the recent years, and is still a developing health service.
    3. Carnatic music is a known therapeutic in many disease states such as diabetes, arthritis, and hypertension.
    4. The raga Ananda Bhairavi has been proved to have a role in reduction of blood pressure.

    Still, it remains a minimally studied area. This study was carried out to provide a thrust to the Carnatic music therapy and provide evidence-based results that the raga Ananda Bhairavi also has a role in pain relief, which is clear from the reduction of analgesic requirement by 50 % in those who listened to raga Ananda Bhairavi.

    Which is the happiest raga?

    Behavior – In order to assign an emotion label to a raga median ratings for each emotion were computed. Shapiro–Wilk normality test were conducted to assess the normality of the data. The normality tests conducted on the ratings of each emotion for all the ragas were significant ( p < 0.001) indicating non-normal distributions of ratings. Consequently, non-parametric statistical tests were used to compare the median ratings of emotions for each raga, To evaluate differences in the medians of ratings of the eight emotions for each raga, Friedman one-way ANOVA by rank tests were conducted (refer to Supplementary Tables S1 and S2 ). The results of Friedman ANOVA were significant at p < 0.001. To further assess the highest experienced emotion post hoc Wilcoxon tests were conducted. For each raga, seven post-hoc Wilcoxon tests were conducted, wherein the median of the highest rated emotion was compared with other seven emotions. In the post hoc test, emotions whose median ratings did not differ significantly from each other were considered as the highest experienced emotions by the participants for that particular raga, On this basis, the highest experienced emotion was determined and emotion label was assigned to each raga, The highest experienced emotions were, ‘calm' and ‘sad' for the arrhythmic phase ( alaap ) of ragas and ‘happy,' ‘tensed,' and ‘longing' for the rhythmic phase ( gat ) of ragas. The ragas with emotion labels of calm/happy were Hansdhwani, Tilak Kamod, Desh, Yaman, Ragesree, Jog while ragas with emotion labels of sad/longing/tensed were Malkauns, Shree, Marwa, Miyan ki Todi, Basant Mukhari, Lalit, Response matrices representing the median ratings of experienced emotions by the participants were plotted for alaap and gat (refer to Figure ​ 1 ). The median ratings of emotion are color coded where the intensity of color represents the strength of the emotional response. The highest median rating for ragas rated as ‘calm/soothing' during ‘ alaap ' shifted to ‘happy' when played in gat, On the other hand, the highest median rating for ragas rated as ‘sad' shifted to ‘longing/yearning' or ‘tensed/restless' during gat, ‘Angry' remained the lowest rated emotion for both categories of ragas, The response matrices represent the median ratings for ragas across the two presentation modes (A) alaap and (B) gat, The median ratings of emotion are color coded: red represents ragas associated with ‘calm' or ‘happy' emotional response while blue represents ragas associated with ‘sad,' ‘longing,' or ‘tensed' emotional response.

    Which raga relieves stress?

    Ragas like Darbari Kanhada, Kamaj, and pooriya, helps in releasing mental tension and reduce the intensity of pain felt by the subjects. The prescribed ragas for hypertension are Ahir bhairav, pooriya, and Todi8-9.

    Which is the king of ragas?

    Next to the sitar, the sarod is the most important stringed music in north Indian classical music. It has been described as a four stringed ‘lute’.

    Which Raag helps you sleep?

    A Balancing Raga for Every Time of Day – Not sure what to listen to, or when? The beauty of Gandharva is that each of the different melodies corresponds to the changing frequencies of nature throughout the day. There are eight praharas (three-hour periods throughout the day)—Sunrise, Morning, Midday, Afternoon, Sunset, Evening, Midnight, and Late Night—and each raga is designed to be played during one of these periods.

    Each prahara (and associated melody) corresponds to different benefits. For instance, the Midday melody (to be played 10 a.m.–1 p.m.) promotes greater energy, success, knowledge, and wisdom, among other benefits. The Evening raga (to be played 7–10 p.m.) supports serenity and expansion and helps you settle down before bed.

    There are also melodies you can listen to at any time of day. Here’s a comprehensive chart:

    Praharas of the day Benefits
    Sandhi Prakash (Transition of Light) 4-7 a.m. Tenderness, Refinement of the Subtlest Feeling Level, Peace, Mental Clarity, Integration of All Levels of Life, Greater Support of Nature.
    Morning 7-10 a.m. Joy, Compassion, Love & Devotion, Patience, Nourishment & Support of the Heart.
    Midday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Strength in Action, Greater Energy, Success in Activity, Knowledge & Wisdom.
    Afternoon 1-4 p.m. Achievement, Success, Creativity, Wealth & Prosperity, Fulfilment of Desire.
    Sandhi Prakash (Transition of Light) 4-7 p.m. Harmony, Coherent Functioning of the Nervous System, Peace, Mental Clarity, Integration of All Levels of Life, Greater Support of Nature.
    Evening 7-10 p.m. Celebration, Expansion, Serenity, Settling Down in Preparation for Sleep.
    Midnight 10 p.m. – 1 a.m. Deep Rest & Relaxation, Better Sleep, Purification, Renewal & Rejuvenation.
    Calmness Tranquility, Inner Strength, Healthy Mind & Body.

    What is the raga of love?

    Madhuvanti expresses a gentle loving sentiment. It depicts the sringaar rasa, used to express the love of an individual towards his or her beloved.

    Which Raag is for memory?

    It was concluded that Memory scores improved immediately after listening to Indian Raga Bhupali.

    Which raag is for mental health?

    Effect of Traditional Raga Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Level in Preoperative Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgeries Achar A, Talwar B, Kumar A, Addanki PS

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE
    Year : 2021 | Volume : 7 | Issue : 3 | Page : 251-253

    /td>

    Effect of Traditional Raga Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Level in Preoperative Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgeries 1, 1, 2, 3 1 Department of Ophthalmology, Kanachur Institute of Medical Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore, Karnataka, India 2 Department of ENT, Kanachur Institute of Medical Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore, Karnataka, India 3 Department of Physiology, Mamata Medical College, Khammam, Telangana, India

    Date of Submission 28-Jul-2021
    Date of Decision 30-Oct-2021
    Date of Acceptance 08-Nov-2021
    Date of Web Publication 24-Dec-2021

    table>

    ul>

  • Correspondence Address :Dr. Ashok KumarDepartment of ENT, Kanachur Institute of Medical Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore 575018, Karnataka India
  • Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None
  • DOI: 10.4103/mamcjms.mamcjms_89_21 Background: Psychologic behavior plays a key role in the outcome of any treatment or therapy. It was recommended to assess the psychologic status of the patient along with the clinical examination and also counsel him with adequate management therapies.

    • Ragas have a high impact on mental well-being.
    • Listening to ragas was reported to be highly effective in regulating the blood pressure and heart rate.
    • Methods: The present study involved 30 (10 males and 20 females) preoperative patients who will be undergoing cataract surgery in 2 days and within the age group of 55 to 60 years from the ophthalmology department.

    The patients were subjected to listen to Raga Bhairavi for 30 minutes for 2 days. Results: There is a significant decrease in depression anxiety and stress levels followed by raga therapy. Conclusion: There is a significant decrease in depression anxiety and stress levels followed by raga therapy.

    How to cite this article: Achar A, Talwar B, Kumar A, Addanki PS. Effect of Traditional Raga Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Level in Preoperative Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgeries. MAMC J Med Sci 2021;7:251-3

    table>

    How to cite this URL: Achar A, Talwar B, Kumar A, Addanki PS. Effect of Traditional Raga Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Level in Preoperative Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgeries. MAMC J Med Sci 2021 ;7:251-3. Available from:

    Psychologic behavior plays a key role in the outcome of any treatment or therapy. It was recommended to assess the psychologic status of the patient along with the clinical examination and also counsel him with adequate management therapies. This not only relieves the stress but also improves the outcome of the treatment.

    Patients become stress when they were explained about the surgical process. Excessive stress will have an adverse effect on an outcome. Stress raises blood pressure and it is mandated to regulate blood pressure before the surgery. Pharmacologic treatment is effective but involved side effects and cannot prescribe long-term use.

    , Hence, the present study used traditional music for the management of stress in patients. Ragas have a high impact on mental well-being. Listening to ragas was reported to be highly effective in regulating blood pressure and heart rate. This effect may be due to the effect on sympathetic and vagal systems.

    1. Ragas were found to be very powerful in the Indian context.
    2. It was proven that there are certain ragas by which person can control the nature such as make the clouds to rain.
    3. Listening to ragas on regular basis is very helpful as it can activate all the chakras in the body.
    4. Further, it increases the quality and quantity of life.

    Raga Bhairavi is one of the ancient ragas which is highly effective in the management of mental health problems. Hence, the present study selected the raga for management of depression, anxiety, and stress levels in preoperative patients undergoing cataract surgeries.

    1. Study design: Experimental study
    2. Study setting: The present study was conducted at Kanachur Institute of Medical Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore, Karnataka, India.
    3. Study population
    4. Raga therapy

    The present study involved 30 (10 males and20 females) preoperative patients who will be undergoing cataract surgery in 2 days and within the age group of 55 to 60 years from the ophthalmology department. Both males and females were included in the study.

    1. Informed consent was obtained from all the patients before the study.
    2. Willing participants were included in the study.
    3. Patients with severe complications were excluded from the study.
    4. The patients were subjected to listen to Raga Bhairavi for 30 minutes for 2 days.
    5. The timing of listening was adjusted to 9 am as per the convenience of patients.

    A standard music system from Philips Company (BTM2180/37 Micro Music System by Philips company, Amsterdam. Netherlands) was used to deliver the music in the ward. Assessment of depression, anxiety, and stress The psychologic parameters were assessed using the DASS 21 scale.

    1. This is a standardized and free scale to assess negative psychologic emotions such as depression, anxiety, and stress.
    2. Ethical consideration The study protocol was approved by an institutional human ethical committee.
    3. Informed consent was obtained from all the participants.
    4. Confidentiality of data was maintained.

    Data analysis Data were analyzed using SPSS 20.0 version, Student t test was used to assess the significance of the difference between the groups. A probability value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. The results are summarized in, The two-tailed P -value is less than 0.0001 for depression score.

    By conventional criteria, this difference is considered to be extremely statistically significant. The mean of group 1 minus group 2 equals 5.00 (95% confidence interval: 3.37–6.63). The two-tailed P -value is less than 0.0001 for anxiety scores. By conventional criteria, this difference is considered to be extremely statistically significant.

    The mean of group 1 minus group 2 equals 6.00 (95% confidence interval: 3.69–8.31). The two-tailed P -value is less than 0.0001 for the stress score. By conventional criteria, this difference is considered to be extremely statistically significant. The mean of group 1 minus group 2 equals 9.00 (95% confidence interval: 6.55–11.45).

    Table 1 Depression, anxiety, and stress patients before and after interventions

    The present study aimed to observe the effect of raga therapy for the management of depression, anxiety, and stress levels in preoperative patients undergoing cataract surgeries. There is a significant decrease in depression anxiety and stress levels followed by raga therapy.

    1. The healing effects of raga therapy are well explained.
    2. In the Indian context of view, the music was believed to be originated from Vedas that is Samaveda.
    3. There was a significant increase in the power of overall alpha, delta, and theta power of EEG waves followed by listening to ragas.
    4. Ragas were reported to improve overall health.

    Music therapy influences the cognition, emotional, physiologic functions, and social well-being of an individual. Music influences the cortical network associated with the emotions and regulates emotions. It was reported that listening to music also influences mood.

    Listening to music improves the positive self-image and improves coping skills. Concentration, meditation, and breathing exercises take place simultaneously when singing or listening to music. Music influences relaxation and it is the best to example that baby sleep listening to music. Music has always positive impact on health and disease conditions.

    It was reported that music has used to heal the adolescents who were substance abused. Music also heals the neurodevelopment delays. Music therapy was reported to prevent cognitive decline. Interestingly, music was used in the management of pain and palliative care.

    There were structural changes in the front limbic region which is associated with the cognitive and emotional functions followed by music therapy., The present study results agree with earlier studies as there was a significant reduction in the scores of depression, anxiety, and stress. There is a significant decrease in depression anxiety and stress levels followed by raga therapy.

    There is a strong need for further studies with multiple centers and a higher sample size to recommend raga therapy in the management of mental health problems in the patients. Financial support and sponsorship Nil. Conflicts of interest There are no conflicts of interest.

    Shalev AY. Posttraumatic stress disorder and stress-related disorders. Psychiatr Clin North Am 2009;32:687-704.
    Jang KL, Thordarson DS, Stein MB, Cohan SL, Taylor S. Coping styles and personality: a biometric analysis. Anxiety Stress Coping 2007;20:17-24.
    Monroe SM. Modern approaches to conceptualizing and measuring human life stress. Annu Rev Clin Psychol 2008;4:33-52.
    Lupien SJ, McEwen BS, Gunnar MR, Heim C. Effects of stress throughout the lifespan on the brain, behavior, and cognition. Nat Rev Neurosci 2009;10:434-45.
    Raj K, Rinchhen CZ, Ringe VV. Stress reduction through listening to Indian classical music during gastroscopy. Diagn Ther Endosc 1989;4:191-7.
    Taylor SE, Stanton AL. Coping resources, coping, processes, and mental health. Annu Rev Clin Psychol 2007;3:377-401.
    Balaji Deekshitulu PV. Stress management for mantra techniques. MOJ Yoga Physical Ther 2017;2:1-4.
    Lovibond SH, Lovibond PF. Manual for the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales.2nd ed. Sydney: Psychology Foundation; 1995.
    Hegde S, Aucouturier JJ, Ramanujam B, Bigand E. Variations in emotional experience during phases of the elaboration of North Indian raga performance. Cambourpoulos E, Tsougras E, Mavromatis P, Pastiadis K. (Editors) Proceedings of 12th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition and the 8th Triennial Conference of the Cognitive Sciences of Music, July 23–28, 2012, pp.412-3.10, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Hegde S. Music-based cognitive remediation therapy for patients with traumatic brain injury. Front Neurol 2014;5:34.
    Zatorre R. Music, the food of neuroscience? Nature 2005;434:312-5.
    Bruscia K. Definindo Musicoterapia, Enelivros.
    Chandrashekaran N. Musical Deficits in Schizophrenia − Its Relation with Deficits in Cognition and Emotion Recognition. MPhil thesis in clinical psychology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India; 2015.
    Sairam TV. Can music replace medicine? Bhavan J 2015;61:64-70.
    Ravi M. Music and spirituality. In: Balodhi JP, ed. Application of Oriental Philosophical Thoughts in Mental Health. Bangalore: NIMHANS Publication 2002. pp.89-98.
    Sambamoorthy P. South Indian Music Book 5.8th ed. Chennai: The Indian Music Publishing House; 2002.
    MacDonald RA. Music, health, and well-being: a review. Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being 2013;8:20635
    Maratos A, Crawford MJ, Procter S. Music therapy for depression: it seems to work, but how? Br J Psychiatry 2011;199:92-3.
    Pasiali V, LaGasse AB, Penn SL. The effect of musical attention control training (MACT) on attention skills of adolescents with neurodevelopmental delays: a pilot study. J Music Ther 2014;51:333-54.
    Guétin S, Giniès P, Siou DK et al. The effects of music intervention in the management of chronic pain: a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Clin J Pain 2012;28:329-37.
    Gutgsell KJ, Schluchter M, Margevicius S et al. Music therapy reduces pain in palliative care patients: a randomized controlled trial. J Pain Symptom Manage 2013;45:822-31.
    Särkämö T, Ripollés P, Vepsäläinen H et al. Structural changes induced by daily music listening in the recovering brain after middle cerebral artery stroke: a voxel-based morphometry study. Front Hum Neurosci 2014;8:245.
    Särkämö T, Tervaniemi M, Laitinen S, Forsblom A, Soinila S, Mikkonen M et al. Music listening enhances cognitive recovery and mood after middle cerebral artery stroke. Brain 2008;131:866-76.

    table>

    table>

    /td>

    Effect of Traditional Raga Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Level in Preoperative Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgeries Achar A, Talwar B, Kumar A, Addanki PS

    Which raag is for pain?

    Discussion – Music is a combination of frequency, beat, density, tone, rhythm, repetition, loudness, and lyrics. Different basic personalities tend to be attracted to certain styles of music. Music influences our emotions because it takes the place of and extends our languages.

    Research conducted over the past 10 years has demonstrated that persistent negative emotional experiences or an obsession and preoccupation with negative emotional states can increase one’s likelihood of acquiring the common cold, other viral infections, yeast infestations, hypersensitivities, heart attacks, high blood pressure, and other disease.

    For better personal health, we can then choose “healthful” music and learn to let ourselves benefit from it. The most benefit from music in terms of health is seen for classical and mediation music, whereas heavy metal or techno are ineffective or even dangerous.

    • There are many composers that effectively improve quality of life and health, particularly Bach, Mozart, and Italian composers.
    • Various studies have suggested that this music not only makes one happy, but also significantly affects the cardiovascular system and significantly influences heart rate, heart rate variability, and blood pressure.

    Music is effective under different conditions and can be utilized as an effective intervention in patients with cardiovascular disturbances, pain, depressive syndromes, and psychiatric diseases and in intensive care medicine. Therefore, music plays an important role in people’s lives and, by extension, an important role in medicine.

    1. Music therapy is a well-established health service offered in many hospitals in other countries.
    2. In India it has emerged in the recent years, and is still a developing health service.
    3. Carnatic music is a known therapeutic in many disease states such as diabetes, arthritis, and hypertension.
    4. The raga Ananda Bhairavi has been proved to have a role in reduction of blood pressure.

    Still, it remains a minimally studied area. This study was carried out to provide a thrust to the Carnatic music therapy and provide evidence-based results that the raga Ananda Bhairavi also has a role in pain relief, which is clear from the reduction of analgesic requirement by 50 % in those who listened to raga Ananda Bhairavi.

    Which raag is for depression?

    1. Introduction – Cancer is a wide spectrum of diseases that can originate in almost any organ or tissue of the body due to the uncontrollable growth of abnormal cells invading neighbouring organs and or spread to other organs ( Bray et al., 2018 ). It is the world’s second leading cause of death, and it is a significant impediment to rising life expectancy in any nation ( Bray et al., 2018 ).

    Cancer is not a disease that affects patients alone; its physical and psychological impact can be seen in caregivers of patients ( Lambert et al., 2016 ). When cancer is diagnosed, family members take up the role of caregivers and start to face the associated difficulties ( Silveira et al., 2010 ; Tamayo et al., 2010 ).

    A great burden is associated with caring for those we love, who are suffering from serious illness ( Terakye, 2011 ). This stress can adversely affect caregivers’ and patients’ mental and physical health. An appropriate strategy is required to address the psychological difficulties of caregivers since caregivers’ wide variety of responsibilities becomes a burden when patient’s functional status declines ( Grunfeld et al., 2004 ).

    1. A meta-analytic study examining the relationship between problems experienced by cancer patients and their caretakers suggests that caregivers’ anguish also influences patients’ distress and vice versa ( Hodges et al., 2005 ).
    2. Studies show that a greater degree of behavioural problems in the patient is related to the reduced mental well-being of the caregiver ( Pinquart and Sorensen, 2007 ).

    Research regarding the reciprocal association between the psychiatric condition of the caregiver and the patient found that if the patient meets the requirements for any mental illness, the caregivers are 7.9 times more likely to meet the psychiatric disorder and vice versa ( Bambauer et al., 2006 ).

    • The caregivers of cancer patients have been diagnosed with psychological issues such as depression, anxiety, and other mental health problems ( Vanderwerker et al., 2005 ).
    • A significant correlation was found between anxiety issues, sleep disturbances, and somatic symptom presentation ( Dong et al., 2013 ).

    Studies have shown that anxiety is considered a natural psychological reaction to ongoing stress among those who care for cancer patients; it triggers a slew of other psychological problems such as sleep disturbances, especially insomnia, which are common in anxiety disorders ( Staner, 2003 ; Vanderwerker et al., 2005 ).

    Depression is another serious psychological issue observed in these caregivers ( Padmaja et al., 2016 ). These therefore would conflict with their role as caregivers and necessitates further effort. Therefore, it is vital to provide a suitable intervention for the caregivers and cancer patients, to improve their well-being as well as disease status.

    It is seen that relaxation therapy has become a well-established approach to stress control in recent decades and is useful in diverse cultural settings ( Beason 2009 ). Recent studies have shown music interventions’ effectiveness in promoting relaxation, improving immunity levels, and stress control in cancer patients ( Nilsson et al., 2009 ; Chuang et al., 2010 ; Greenman, 2009 ; Lai et al., 2006 ; Lane, 1992 ).

    Music therapy gives an effect of relaxation, which helps to increase the well-being of cancer patients caregivers and reduces distress. Music therapy is defined as a systematic process of intervention wherein the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them as dynamic forces of change.

    Experiences with music entail musical interaction, which may be improvised or not. It involves patients playing music, listening to music, or both. Other modes include singing, song writing, and playing instruments to compose music ( Sundar, 2007 ; Rafieyan and Ries, 2007 ).

    It is less known about the soothing mechanism of music, but still, few researches have found there has been a correlation between music and emotional excitement ( Salimpoor et al., 2009 ). Perceptual and emotional processing are the two ways the human brain processes music ( Nizamie and Tikka, 2014 ).

    In perceptual processing, the pitch, intensity, roughness of sound, etc. are perceived by the individual with the help of neural circuitry, whereas in emotional processing brain differentiates between pleasant and unpleasant music with the help of frontal and temporal lobes, respectively ( Boso et al., 2006 ; Lin et al., 2011 ; Blood et al., 1999 ).

    1. The raga-based approach is used in Indian music therapy very widely.
    2. This strategy is calming, attention-enhancing, and can target musical taste and listening habits ( Nizamie and Tikka, 2014 ).
    3. Raga Bilahari in Carnatic music is considered perfect for mornings that exude positivity and happiness ( Sarkar and Biswas, 2015 ).

    It relieves fear response, pain sensation, skin diseases, and allergic reactions. Research reveals that using an instrumental and vocal recording of Bilahari raga together helps to alleviate fear, stress, and depression ( Sunitha et al., 2018 ). The bhakti rasa that Bilahari pours out is well recognized.

    The ragas sound lovely and may lift the mood when sung at the appropriate time ( Bhagyalekshmy, 1990 ). The brain’s neocortex is stimulated by the repeating rhythmic features of music, which reduces impulsivity and relaxes people ( Hegde, 2014 ). Though Carnatic raga-Bilahari-based music intervention is found to be a relaxant, improve positivity, reduce anxiety, stress, and depression, its therapeutic effectiveness among the caregivers of cancer patients is less explored.

    Hence, the current study aims to determine the effect of raga-based Carnatic music intervention on anxiety, sleep disturbances, somatic symptoms and distress level of cancer caregivers.

    What are the benefits of raga abhogi?

    Raagas (musical notes) have healing power A raaga is one of the melodic modes used in Indian Classical Music. A raga uses a series of five or more musical notes upon which a melody is built. However, the way the notes are approached and rendered in musical phrases and the mood they convey are more important in defining a raga than the notes themselves.

    In the Indian musical tradition, ragas are associated with different times of the day, and even with seasons. Indian classical music is always set in ragas. Numerous film songs and ghazals are set in ragas. We have heard stories such as – when Tansen sang raga Megh Malhaar it started raining immediately, when he sang raga Deepak lamps got lit automatically, and sometimes when Tansen sang, wild animals would come and sit at his feet.

    Please recall the famous “Dukh Bhare Din Bite Re Bhaiya” from Mother India (1957) or “Kaare Kaare Badra, Suni Suni Ratiya” from Mera Naam Joker (1970) to enjoy the peacefulness and the passion of Megh Malhaar. “Divane Tum, Divane Hum” from film Bezuban (1962) in Raag Bageshri,”Hamse Aya Na Gaya” from Film Dekh Kabira Roya (1957), “Madhuban Me Radhika Nache re” from film Kohinoor (1960) in raag Hamir, “Zir Zir Barase Sawani Akhiya” from film Ashirwad (1968) in raag Gaur Malhar are some excellent examples how the composers used ragas in their fullest power.

    Music has a healing power; it stimulates the pituitary gland, which secretes hormones that affect the nervous system and the flow of blood. When you listen to hard rock with Drums/Congo/Bongo the rate of your heart beats increase in manifold while when you listen to slow and soft music it calms your nerves and takes you to pensive state.

    The ancient system of Nada Yoga, acknowledges the impact of music on body and mind. Vibrations are produced from sounds to uplift one’s level of consciousness. You should visit Osho Ashram, Pune to experience how vibrations in their resonance can synchronize with our moods.

    Ragas help fight aging and pain. Words don’t express music. Music expresses itself. There is a famous quote by Aldous Huxley. And, Douglas Adams says “Beethoven tells you what it is like to be Beethoven and Mozart tells you what it’s like to be human. Bach tells you what it’s like to be the universe.” There are some great physicians who treat their patients with musical therapy.

    Choosing the right kind of music is helpful in promoting health. Negative traits like anger, worries also can be overcome through listening to good music. Depression can be cured by music therapy. When you are feeling low, soft and soothing music is recommended.

    In order to study the depth nature of impact of Indian classical music on the physiology and disease status of working men and also to assess how far it helps in efficiency and work potential of workers, the well known ‘panchkarma’ practitioner and exponent of ‘Gandharva Music Therapy’, Dr. Gopalkrishna Waghralkar of the Waghralkar’s Hospital & Resarch Institute, Nagpur has launched a project which is sponsored by Bank of Maharashtra.

    The employees of Bank of Maharashtra in the city work in musical surroundings. Aggrieved customers can also feel better and perhaps they will get better services in its selected branches. Dr. Waghralkar is assisted by a team of other specialization doctors.

    The ancient Hindus had relied on music for its curative role. The chants in Veda Mantras in praise of God have been used as a cure for several disharmonies in individuals as well as in environment. Several sects of ‘Bhakti’ such as Chaitanya, Sampradaya, Vallabha sampradaya have all accorded priority to music.

    Haridas Swami who was the guru of Tansen in Emperor Akbar’s empire was an astonishing musician. Though very little is known about him, it seems Harodas Swami has healed some individuals through his musical rendering. Legendary classical music maestro Thyagraja brought a dead person alive through his Bilahari composition Naa Jiva Dhaara.

    The music library at Thanjavur is reported to contain such a treasure on ragas that spells out the application and use of various ragas in fighting common ailments. Ragas help activating the seven energy Chakras in body. They have the power to stimulate the chakras in right proportion. The activation of chakras allows the Kundalini energy to rise easily and energize and nourish the chakra.

    It is reported that Kundalini awakening results in deep meditation, enlightenment and bliss. This awakening involves the Kundalini physically moving up from the Muladhar chakra through the central channel to reside within the Sahasrara Chakra at the top of the head.

    This movement of Kundalini is felt by the presence of a cool or, in the case of imbalance, a warm breeze across the palms of the hands or the soles of the feet. Practitioners of Kundalini awakening have expressed mysterious experiences. A piece of advice – you need a mature and holistic Guru to practice Kundalini meditation.

    The raga also helps to maintain the chakra in its optimum spin and balance, ensuring a balanced energy supply to different organs that are connected to the specific chakra. My musical Guru Dr. Pandit Parmanand Yadavji says that the raga Shyam Kalyan helps activate the Mooladhara chakra.

    This chakra enables physical identity, survival, stability, instinctual nature, ambition, and self-sufficiency. The sense governed by Muladhar is smell. Raga Yaman has the power to stimulate the Swadishthan chakra that governs our attention. The sense associated with swadhisthana is taste, the sense organ is the tongue and the organs of activity are the sexual organs, kidneys and entire urinary system.

    Therefore swadhisthana is largely responsible for purification of all bodily fluids through the kidneys, bladder and lymph system, and for the continuation of life through the sex organs and glands of reproduction. It governs the gonads and production of sexual hormones and therefore has a very strong influence upon our moods and emotions.

    Swadhisthana is also linked to the mobility of our joints and especially the hip joints and pelvic area Raga Abhogi helps activate the Solar Plexus (Manipura) chakra and stimulate the digestion process. When the Kundalini enters this Chakra, the Chakra is cleansed, bringing about a change of attitudes and inner transformation.

    This raga is also known to bring about de-addiction in human beings. It helps one give up vices and impulsive or compulsive habits. This raga helps develop the quality of the water element. This chakra when not activated leads to poor digestion, weight problems, ulcers, diabetes, hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, arthritis, pancreas, liver or kidney problems, anorexia, bulimia, hepatitis, intestinal tumors, colon disease.

    The ragas Bhairav and Durga have a power of attaining divine bliss and protection. Both help activate the Anahat (Heart) chakra. When the Kundalini touches the heart chakra, the person experiences spiritual powers. Raga Durga boosts self-confidence and helps develop the quality of the air element. These ragas also enhance the Divinity and Immunity in children.

    The Heart Chakra is the home of emotional processing. In a sense, the Heart Chakra is all about self-less love and compassion. The heart processes our emotions for us. We grieve and mourn and equally celebrate and laugh raucously, from the heart. The Raga Jayjaywanti helps to activate the Vishuddhi (Throat) chakra, the controller of the sensory organs.

    1. This raga also develops the quality of the air element and the expression of voice, and helps make one’s personality loving.
    2. This chakra makes us expressive.
    3. It is our communication center in body.
    4. It’s important to remember, however, that communication is not just about you talking but it’s also about listening.

    An imbalanced throat chakra can display itself in many ways. Some signs of imbalance are lying, arrogance, talking too much, being manipulative, fear and timidity. The Raga Bhup helps purify and open the Third Eye (Ajana) chakra. It helps relieve tensions, anger and mental fatigue.

    The mood created by this Raga helps the Kundalini pass through the Agnya chakra and enter the Sahasrara in the limbic area of the brain. Third Eye Chakra is the 6th Chakra and is responsible to what we refer to as “the sixth sense”. The Chakra connects us to our internal intuitions and is responsible for the sharp senses, the ability to read the future and receive non-verbal messages.

    Through the Third Eye we communicate with the world and can even receive messages from the past and from the future. It grants us our sense of observation. Ragas Darbari and Bhairavi are helpful in activating our Sahasrara (Crown) chakra. The notes of these ragas help relax and calm the emotionally-related limbic area.

    1. When the Kundalini energy reaches this chakra, soothes and nourishes the Sahasrara chakra and the brain.
    2. The result is that one feels, joyous, energetic, peaceful and relieved of tension and depression.
    3. The crown chakra is the center for trust, devotion, inspiration, happiness, and positivity.
    4. It’s also the center for deeper connection with you and deeper connection with a force of life that is greater than us.

    Ragas in Hindustani classical music have relation to special time of a day and different seasons as well. Seasonal ragas can be performed any time (day or night) during that season. Raga Deepak is related to summer; Megh and Miyan ki Malhar are for the rainy season; Malkauns and Puriya Dhanashree are the ragas for autumn; the roughness of winter is conveyed best through Bhairav, another name for Siva – the god of destruction; and Raag Hindola expresses spring, the season of vitality and romance.