Stomach Pain Doctor

0 Comments

Stomach Pain Doctor
What does a gastroenterologist do? – A gastroenterologist is a specialist with expertise in the disorders and diseases that affect the digestive system — which includes the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum and anus) as well as the pancreas, liver, bile ducts and gallbladder.

Unexplained changes in bowel habits, including diarrhea, constipation and blood in the stool Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) Heartburn Hemorrhoids Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Pancreatitis Ulcers

“Gastroenterologists are trained to perform a number of procedures used to help diagnose and treat these conditions, such as upper endoscopy, colonoscopy, biopsy and the various endoscopic techniques needed to visualize the digestive system, including endoscopic ultrasound,” explains Dr. Glassner.

Can I go to the doctor for stomach pain?

When to Seek Immediate Medical Attention – Severe abdominal pain may be an emergency. If your pain is sudden and severe, or if it occurs with any of the following, you should seek immediate medical attention:

Persistent vomiting and nausea Constipation (especially with vomiting) Vomiting blood Bleeding from the bowels Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Severe tenderness when touching your abdomen Yellowish skin and eyes Abdominal swelling Lasts for several days If you are pregnant or think you might be

Should I call a doctor of my stomach is in pain?

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if: –

a stomach ache gets much worse quicklystomach pain or bloating will not go away or keeps coming backyou have stomach pain and problems with swallowing foodyou’re losing weight without trying toyou suddenly pee more often or less oftenpeeing is suddenly painfulyou bleed from your bottom or vagina, or have abnormal discharge from your vaginayou have diarrhoea that does not go away after a few days

When should I see a gastroenterologist for abdominal pain?

Dealing With Stomach Pain? Visit Our Honesdale Gastroenterology Specialists – If you are experiencing persistent or chronic stomach pain that does not alleviate with traditional remedies and treatments or dietary changes, or is accompanied by other symptoms like fever, rectal bleeding, or changes in bowel movements, it is important to see a gastroenterologist for an accurate diagnosis and treatment.

How long is too long for stomach pain?

Stomach pain; Pain – abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache Abdominal pain is pain that you feel anywhere between your chest and groin. This is often referred to as the stomach region or belly. You know that awful feeling: you’re nauseous; your stomach feels like it’s tied in a knot, and you don’t even want to move. What does your pain mean? Well, let’s talk today about abdominal pain. So, what causes abdominal pain? Almost everyone has pain in their belly at one time or another.

Most of the time, a serious medical problem is not the cause, and how bad your pain is doesn’t always reflect the seriousness of the problem causing your pain. You may feel very bad pain if you are having gas or stomach cramps due to viral gastroenteritis, better known as a stomach virus. And some life-threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or a very early case of appendicitis, may cause only mild pain, or no pain at all.

The important thing to know about abdominal pain is when you need immediate medical care. Less serious causes of abdominal pain include constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, food allergies, lactose intolerance, food poisoning, and a stomach virus. Other, more serious, causes include appendicitis, an abdominal aortic aneurysm, a bowel blockage, cancer, and gastroesophageal reflux.

  1. Sometimes, you may have abdominal pain from a problem that isn’t in your belly, like a heart attack, menstrual cramps, or pneumonia.
  2. So, what do you do about abdominal pain? Well, if you have mild abdominal pain, here are some helpful tips; Try sipping water or other clear fluids.
  3. Avoid solid food for the first few hours.

If you’ve been vomiting, wait 6 hours and then eat small amounts of mild foods like rice, applesauce, or crackers. If your pain is high in your abdomen and occurs after meals, antacids may help, especially if you are feeling heartburn or indigestion. You should seek medical attention if you have abdominal pain and are being treated for cancer, you can’t pass any stool, you’re vomiting blood, or you have chest, neck, or shoulder pain. There are three body views (front, back, and side) that can help you to identify a specific body area. The labels show areas of the body which are identified either by anatomical or by common names. For example, the back of the knee is called the “popliteal fossa,” while the “flank” is an area on the side of the body. The process of digesting food is accomplished by many organs in the body. Food is pushed by the esophagus into the stomach. The stomach mixes the food and begins the breakdown of proteins. The stomach propels the food then into the small intestine. The small intestine further digests food and begins the absorption of nutrients. Since the abdominal area contains many different organs it is divided in smaller areas. One division method, uses one median sagittal plane and one transverse plane that passes through the umbilicus at right angles. This method divides the abdomen into four quadrants. Medical personnel can easily refer to these quadrants when describing pain or injury regarding a victim. The appendix is a small finger-shaped tube that branches off the first part of the large intestine. The appendix can become inflamed or infected causing pain in the lower right part of the abdomen. Blood from the aorta reaches the kidneys so it can be filtered and cleaned. Among other functions, the kidneys remove toxins, metabolic waste, and excess ions from the blood which leaves the body in the form of urine. You know that awful feeling: you’re nauseous; your stomach feels like it’s tied in a knot, and you don’t even want to move.

  • What does your pain mean? Well, let’s talk today about abdominal pain.
  • So, what causes abdominal pain? Almost everyone has pain in their belly at one time or another.
  • Most of the time, a serious medical problem is not the cause, and how bad your pain is doesn’t always reflect the seriousness of the problem causing your pain.
You might be interested:  How Long Does Pain Last After Tooth Extraction

You may feel very bad pain if you are having gas or stomach cramps due to viral gastroenteritis, better known as a stomach virus. And some life-threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or a very early case of appendicitis, may cause only mild pain, or no pain at all.

  1. The important thing to know about abdominal pain is when you need immediate medical care.
  2. Less serious causes of abdominal pain include constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, food allergies, lactose intolerance, food poisoning, and a stomach virus.
  3. Other, more serious, causes include appendicitis, an abdominal aortic aneurysm, a bowel blockage, cancer, and gastroesophageal reflux.

Sometimes, you may have abdominal pain from a problem that isn’t in your belly, like a heart attack, menstrual cramps, or pneumonia. So, what do you do about abdominal pain? Well, if you have mild abdominal pain, here are some helpful tips; Try sipping water or other clear fluids.

Avoid solid food for the first few hours. If you’ve been vomiting, wait 6 hours and then eat small amounts of mild foods like rice, applesauce, or crackers. If your pain is high in your abdomen and occurs after meals, antacids may help, especially if you are feeling heartburn or indigestion. You should seek medical attention if you have abdominal pain and are being treated for cancer, you can’t pass any stool, you’re vomiting blood, or you have chest, neck, or shoulder pain.

Call your doctor if you have abdominal pain that lasts 1 week or longer, if your pain doesn’t improve in 24 to 48 hours, if bloating lasts more than 2 days, or if you have diarrhea for more than 5 days.

Can endoscopy detect abdominal pain?

Why it’s done – An upper endoscopy is used to diagnose and sometimes treat conditions that affect the upper part of the digestive system. The upper digestive system includes the esophagus, stomach and beginning of the small intestine (duodenum). Your provider may recommend an endoscopy procedure to:

Investigate symptoms. An endoscopy can help determine what’s causing digestive signs and symptoms, such as heartburn, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, difficulty swallowing and gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnose. An endoscopy offers an opportunity to collect tissue samples (biopsy) to test for diseases and conditions that may be causing anemia, bleeding, inflammation or diarrhea. It can also detect some cancers of the upper digestive system. Treat. Special tools can be passed through the endoscope to treat problems in your digestive system. For example, an endoscopy can be used to burn a bleeding vessel to stop bleeding, widen a narrow esophagus, clip off a polyp or remove a foreign object.

An endoscopy is sometimes combined with other procedures, such as an ultrasound. An ultrasound probe may be attached to the endoscope to create images of the wall of your esophagus or stomach. An endoscopic ultrasound may also help create images of hard-to-reach organs, such as your pancreas.

What is the difference between a gastrologist and a gastroenterologist?

What is the difference between a gastrologist and a gastroenterologist? – Practically, there is no difference between the two specialists since one (gastrologist) is only a commonly adapted word of a gastroenterologist. Contrary to the definition of gastrology, all stomach ailments are also covered in gastroenterology; hence, patients with any kind of issues related to the GI tract including the stomach need to visit a gastroenterologist.

When is stomach pain bad enough to go to hospital?

If the abdominal pain is severe and unrelenting, your stomach is tender to the touch, or if the pain extends to your back, you should immediately visit the closest emergency department.

How do I know if my stomach pain is life threatening?

Abdominal or stomach pain can have many causes. It may be due to food poisoning, an intestinal or gall bladder obstruction, an infection or inflammation. It could also be appendicitis, a kidney stone or peptic ulcer disease. In women abdominal pain can result from an ectopic pregnancy, an ovarian cyst, pelvic inflammatory disease or other female organ disorder.

  1. In addition, some people with pneumonia, a bladder infection or a heart attack experience abdominal pain.
  2. Acute abdominal pain can also be caused by chronic medical conditions, such as pancreatitis; colitis, an inflammation of the large intestine (colon); or diverticulitis, an inflammation of small out-pouchings along the colon wall.
You might be interested:  How To Cure Loose Motion Instantly

For mild abdominal pain, call your doctor first. If the pain is sudden, severe or does not ease within 30 minutes, seek emergency medical care. Sudden abdominal pain is often an indicator of serious intra-abdominal disease, such as a perforated ulcer or a ruptured abdominal aneurysm, although it could also result from a benign disease, such as gallstones.

Symptoms of appendicitis may include severe pain (usually in the lower right abdomen, but may start anywhere in the abdomen), loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting or fever. Treatment generally requires urgent surgical removal of the appendix. Long delays in treatment can cause serious complications resulting from perforation (rupture) of the appendix, which can lead to a life-threatening infection. Symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy include severe abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. In an ectopic pregnancy, a fertilized egg has implanted outside of the normal site in the “womb” or uterus, such as in the fallopian tubes. Symptoms of acute pancreatitis usually include pain in the middle upper abdomen that may last for a few days. The pain may become severe and constant, or it may be sudden and intense. It may also begin as mild pain that gets worse when food is eaten. Other symptoms include nausea, a swollen and tender abdomen, fever and a rapid pulse.

Anyone who thinks they’re having a medical emergency should not hesitate to seek care. Federal law ensures that anyone who comes to the emergency department is treated and stabilized, and that their insurance provides coverage based on symptoms, not a final diagnosis. Read more about Know When to Go Infections & Infectious Diseases Know When to Go Public Education

How do I talk to my doctor about stomach pain?

If you’re a bit embarrassed about your gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms or are reluctant to talk about them in certain settings, it’s quite normal to feel that way. There’s a time and a place for everything. When it comes to GI symptoms, there’s no better time or place than the doctor’s office.

  • That’s where you need to push past any hesitations and get real about GI symptoms.
  • Telling your doctor you have “abdominal discomfort” or “trouble with digestion” can mean a lot of things.
  • It leaves too much room for misinterpretation.
  • Break it down and provide details.
  • If the pain borders on unbearable at times, then say so.

Use the 0 to 10 pain scale. Describe how it makes you feel, how long it lasts, and what foods or activities appear to prompt your symptoms. You can — and should — talk about changes in the appearance of your stool, stool that seems to defy flushing, or stool that smells so foul you can hardly stand it.

  • Be specific about your symptoms.
  • Your doctor has heard it all before, and they’ve studied the inner workings of the human GI tract.
  • Doctors aren’t squeamish about these things.
  • It’s part of the job! Nothing you say about your symptoms is going to put them off.
  • It can only help get you closer to resolution.

It’s normal if you have a little gas every now and then or burp after meals, we all do. But if your symptoms are persistent and keep you from your life, put them in context to help your doctor understand the magnitude of the problem. Tell your doctor if your symptoms:

keep you up at nightstop you from doing things you enjoyhave resulted in lost work or caused embarrassment on the jobare preventing you from eating wellmake you feel ill a good part of the timeare affecting relationships are isolating youare causing anxiety or depression

Talk about what this is doing to your overall quality of life. Helping your doctor fully understand makes it easier for them to help. The GI tract is complicated and can be affected by many things. The more information your doctor has to work with, the better. Be sure to discuss:

recent medical tests and resultspreviously diagnosed conditionsfamily history of GI disorders, cancers, or autoimmune disordersuse of prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications now and in the recent pastany dietary supplements you takefoods or activities that make matters worseanything you’ve already tried to feel better

Tell your doctor if you have signs of malnutrition, such as:

loss of appetiteweight lossweaknessfatiguelow mood or depression

It’s fine to bring up research you’ve done about GI conditions. You can’t diagnose yourself, but your research can prompt you to ask your doctor the right questions. The goal is to be an active participant in your own healthcare. Although your doctor isn’t likely to make a diagnosis on your first visit, they may have a few thoughts about what your symptoms mean.

acid refluxheartburngastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI)gallstonesirritable bowel syndrome (IBS)pancreatic cancerpancreatitispeptic ulcer

Your doctor may be able to eliminate some of these as a concern right away based on your set of symptoms. To reach a diagnosis or to eliminate some, your doctor will probably suggest taking a few tests. Knowing what to expect can help the process go more smoothly, so feel free to ask questions. Here are some suggestions:

You might be interested:  Podophyllum Is Used To Treat Which Disease

What is the purpose of this test? What can the results tell us?Is there anything I need to do to prepare?How long will the test take?Will I need anesthesia? Do I need to arrange a ride home? Should I expect any aftereffects?Will I be able to resume normal activities right away?When will we know the results?

This is an important conversation to have with your doctor. You still don’t know the root of the problem, but symptoms are disruptive. There may be a few things you can do to feel a little better. Here are some questions to ask:

Should I be using prescription or OTC medications to relieve specific symptoms?Do I need to take dietary supplements?Are there any foods that may be beneficial? Are there any exercises or relaxation techniques I should try?Do you have any tips for getting a better night’s sleep?

By the same token, doing the wrong things can make matters worse. Ask:

Are there any prescription or OTC medications I should avoid?Should I stop taking dietary supplements?What foods and drinks likely trigger problems?Are there certain physical activities that can exacerbate symptoms?

Knowing the do’s and don’ts can help you bridge the gap until your next appointment. If you’re used to living with pain and GI symptoms, you may not recognize when you need immediate medical attention. Ask about the warning signs of life threatening problems such as internal bleeding. For example, signs of GI bleeding include:

stools are black or contain bright red bloodvomit with bright red blood or consistency of coffee groundsabdominal crampsweakness, fatigue, or palenessshortness of breath, dizziness, or faintingrapid pulselittle or no urination

Your doctor can elaborate on these and other symptoms to watch for. GI symptoms can be difficult to talk about, but don’t let that stop you from getting the help you need. Prepare for your visit by making a list of questions and topics you want to discuss. The more details you can provide, the better. Any nervousness you have will be temporary and a good doctor will appreciate your honesty.

Is stomach pain a reason to go to the hospital?

Abdominal or stomach pain can have many causes. It may be due to food poisoning, an intestinal or gall bladder obstruction, an infection or inflammation. It could also be appendicitis, a kidney stone or peptic ulcer disease. In women abdominal pain can result from an ectopic pregnancy, an ovarian cyst, pelvic inflammatory disease or other female organ disorder.

In addition, some people with pneumonia, a bladder infection or a heart attack experience abdominal pain. Acute abdominal pain can also be caused by chronic medical conditions, such as pancreatitis; colitis, an inflammation of the large intestine (colon); or diverticulitis, an inflammation of small out-pouchings along the colon wall.

For mild abdominal pain, call your doctor first. If the pain is sudden, severe or does not ease within 30 minutes, seek emergency medical care. Sudden abdominal pain is often an indicator of serious intra-abdominal disease, such as a perforated ulcer or a ruptured abdominal aneurysm, although it could also result from a benign disease, such as gallstones.

Symptoms of appendicitis may include severe pain (usually in the lower right abdomen, but may start anywhere in the abdomen), loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting or fever. Treatment generally requires urgent surgical removal of the appendix. Long delays in treatment can cause serious complications resulting from perforation (rupture) of the appendix, which can lead to a life-threatening infection. Symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy include severe abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. In an ectopic pregnancy, a fertilized egg has implanted outside of the normal site in the “womb” or uterus, such as in the fallopian tubes. Symptoms of acute pancreatitis usually include pain in the middle upper abdomen that may last for a few days. The pain may become severe and constant, or it may be sudden and intense. It may also begin as mild pain that gets worse when food is eaten. Other symptoms include nausea, a swollen and tender abdomen, fever and a rapid pulse.

Anyone who thinks they’re having a medical emergency should not hesitate to seek care. Federal law ensures that anyone who comes to the emergency department is treated and stabilized, and that their insurance provides coverage based on symptoms, not a final diagnosis. Read more about Know When to Go Infections & Infectious Diseases Know When to Go Public Education

What happens if stomach pain goes untreated?

Treatment for gastritis – Treatment for gastritis depends on what’s causing it. You might need:

antibioticsmedicines to control stomach acid and stop it from rising into your food pipe (oesophagus), such as antacids, proton pump inhibitors or alginatesto talk to your doctor about stopping anti-inflammatory painkillers (such as ibuprofen) or aspirin and trying a different medicine, if possibleto stop drinking alcohol, if gastritis is caused by alcohol

If it’s not treated, gastritis may get worse and cause a stomach ulcer, If gastritis is not getting better, or it’s causing severe symptoms, a GP might refer you to a specialist stomach doctor (gastroenterologist). They might do a test to look inside your stomach, called a gastroscopy,

What stomach pain should you not ignore?

A sharp pain that doesn’t let up can indicate acute appendicitis (if it’s on your lower right side), diverticulitis or a serious infection. The context is important, Lee says, because muscle cramps and other issues can also manifest as sharp pain.