This World Shall Know Pain

0 Comments

This World Shall Know Pain

What did Pain say in Japanese before destroying Konoha?

Pain’s famous “Shinra Tensei” in Naruto and everything he said before destroying the Konoha village – Character developments in Naruto thrived a lot on backstories, which showcased the various struggles each endured coming into the current timeline. Pain was one of the three war orphans who joined the Akatsuki group. Pain and Nagato (Image via Naruto) His quest to destroy the Hidden Leaf Village came with the primary objective of obtaining Naruto and the Nine-Tailed Beasts, Just before completely nuking Konoha, Pain said the following words: “Feel pain. Contemplate pain.

Accept pain. Know pain. One who does not know pain cannot possibly understand true peace. I will never forget Yahiko’s pain. And now, the world shall know pain. Shinra Tensei.” Shinra Tensei, also known as Almighty Push, is considered one of the strongest abilities of those who wield a Rinnegan. After casting, the user can manipulate repulsive force to push everything away, both matter and technique.

In this case, it was the entirety of a village, starting from the middle, all the way to the borders. Destruction of the Hidden Leaf Village (Image via Naruto) The user can significantly increase its area-of-effect and overall strength based on the amount of Chakra used in this specific ability, while in effect, no form of attack can harm the user’s body. As mentioned earlier, the word “Pain” was given by Nagato, a war orphan with the ability of Rinnegan. While he controlled six corpses simultaneously with his power, one of the corpses was of his childhood friend, Yahiko. Hence, while the words “Yahiko’s pain” could mean a lot of things, the most logical deduction is Nagato’s anger at the fact that Yahiko died without seeing the world at peace, which the latter fought for all his life. GIF Cancel Reply ❮ ❯

Does Pain say you shall know Pain?

2 ‘The World Will Know Real Pain.’ Pain repeatedly states that he wants the world to know pain.

Who is pain’s real identity?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nagato
Naruto character
Nagato as drawn by Masashi Kishimoto
First appearance Naruto, chapter 238 Naruto Shippuden episode 128: Tales of a Gutsy Ninja
Created by Masashi Kishimoto
Voiced by Japanese Junpei Morita Ken’yu Horiuchi (Pain) Tomoaki Maeno (child) Shiho Hisajima (female animal path) English Vic Mignogna Troy Baker (Pain) Matthew Mercer (Pain episode 376 or 454 and up, Naruto Shippuden: Ultimate Ninja Storm 4, and Rock Lee & His Ninja Pals) Dave Wittenberg (Pain in episode 135) Kari Wahlgren (female animal path in Naruto Shippuden: Ultimate Ninja Storm 2) Stephanie Sheh (female animal path in Naruto: Shippuden)
In-universe information
Alias Pain
Title Leader of The Akatsuki

Nagato ( Japanese : 長門 ), known primarily under the alias of Pain ( ペイン, Pein ), is a fictional character in the manga and anime series Naruto created by Masashi Kishimoto, Nagato is the figurehead leader of the Akatsuki who wishes to capture the tailed beasts sealed into various people around the shinobi world.

After acquiring and sealing most of the beasts within a Gedo statue, Nagato’s advisor advises him to capture the Nine-Tailed Demon Fox sealed inside the series’ protagonist, Naruto Uzumaki (whom he turns out to be related to). Before leaving to capture Naruto, Nagato engages in a mortal battle with his former mentor, Jiraiya,

How to CLIMB till DIVINE as a CARRY

His past as a war orphan, and his loss of his best friend are explored. Due to his traumatic experiences, which stemmed from human conflict, Nagato aims to create a new world, free from the chaos of war. Nagato also appears in the series’ video games,

Nagato was conceived by Kishimoto as a villain, a victim of war, who would show Naruto the impact of world wars, something Kishimoto aimed to explore throughout the series. While Nagato does not fight in the story, he uses a group of corpses known as “The Six Paths of Pain” ( ペイン六道, Pein Rikudō ), All of them were given elaborate designs with multiple piercings across their bodies to reinforce the idea that despite his calm demeanor, Nagato is a dangerous person.

Critical response to Nagato’s character has been generally positive, praising the chaos he brings to the story, including the murder of Jiraiya and the destruction of Konoha itself while chasing Naruto. His eventual fight against Naruto has been regarded as one of the best battles in the entire series.

What is the most heartbreaking scene in Naruto?

4 Jiraya’s Death Is Shocking & Sudden – From the moment he’s introduced, Jiraiya is more of a comic relief than anything, He may be Naruto’s mentor, but when he’s not teaching his student new techniques, he’s out getting into all sorts of trouble and ridiculous antics. No one could have ever expected such a fun and humorous character would ever meet a tragic end, but that’s exactly what happened.

Why is Pain so bad in Naruto?

Pain is nominally a villain in Naruto but he has shown many heroic qualities in the series, leading some to question his allegiances. Pain was one of the main antagonists to the early act of Naruto: Shippuden, The leader of the Akatsuki, his diabolical intentions for the planet make him an easily contemptible villain. However, much of his motives are only on account of his troubled past, evincing there may be more to his morality than is immediately evident.

What is Japan’s response to Pain?

Swearing as a response to pain: A cross-cultural comparison of British and Japanese participants , October 2017, Pages 267-272 Research suggests swearing can moderate pain perception. The present study assessed whether changes in pain perception due to swearing reflect a “scripting” effect by comparing swearing as a response to pain in native English and Japanese speakers. Cognitive psychology denotes a ‘script’ to be a sequence of learnt behaviours expected for given situations. Japanese participants were included as they rarely, if ever, swear as a response to pain and therefore do not possess an available script for swearing in the context of pain. It was hypothesised that Japanese participants would demonstrate less tolerance and more sensitivity to pain than English participants, and – due to a lack of an available script of swearing in response to pain – that Japanese participants would not experience swearword mediated hypoalgesia. Fifty-six native English (mean age = 23 years) and 39 Japanese (mean age = 21) speakers completed a cold-pressor task whilst repeating either a swear on control word. A 2 (culture; Japanese, British) × 2 (word; swear; non-swear) design explored whether Japanese participants showed the same increase in pain tolerance and experienced similar levels of perceived pain when a swearing intervention was used as British participants. Pain tolerance was assessed by the number of seconds participants could endure of cold-pressor exposure and self-report pain measurements. Levels of perceived pain were assessed using a 120-mm horizontal visual analogue scale anchored by descriptors in the participant’s native language of “no pain” (left) and “terrible pain” (right). The participant was asked to mark a 10 mm vertical line to indicate overall pain intensity. The score was measured from the zero anchor to the participant’s mark. Japanese participants reported higher levels of pain ( p < 0.005) and displayed lower pain tolerance than British participants ( p < 0.05). Pain tolerance increased in swearers regardless of cultural background ( p < 0.001) and no interaction was found between word group and culture ( p = 0.96), thereby suggesting that swearing had no differential effect related to the cultural group of the participant. The results replicate previous findings that swearing increases pain tolerance and that individuals from an Asian ethnic background experience greater levels of perceived pain than those from a Caucasian ethnic background. However, these results do not support the idea of pain perception modification due to a "scripting" effect. This is evidenced as swearword mediated hypoalgesia occurs irrespective of participant cultural background. Rather, it is suggested that modulation of pain perception may occur through activation of descending inhibitory neural pain mechanisms. As swearing can increase pain tolerance in both Japanese and British people, it may be suggested that swearword mediated hypoalgesia is a universal phenomenon that transcends socio-cultural learnt behaviours. Furthermore, swearing could be encouraged as an intervention to help people cope with acute painful stimuli. Research has shown that the act of repeating a swearword can elicit an increase in pain tolerance when compared with repeating a non-swear word,,, The hypoalgesic effect has been explained as being mediated by the sympathetic nervous system triggered by swearing, However, an alternative explanation posits that the act of voluntarily vocalising modulates responses to pain by engaging in a pre-learnt scripted behaviour. The term "script" in cognitive psychology was coined to denote the idea that many transactions are stereotypical to the point that they can be written down like a script, It may be this scripted aspect of swearing in response to pain that produces the hypoalgesic effect by distracting attention from processing the pain response, perhaps by evoking familiarity or positive emotions. One way of assessing the scripted explanation of swearing in response to pain would be a cross-cultural comparison between cultures that differ in the degree of social acceptability afforded to swearing as a pain behaviour. The English language has a colourful and expansive profane vocabulary and swearing as a response to pain is culturally accepted and commonplace within British culture, In contrast, the Japanese language is filled with subtle verbal nuances that allow for verbal denigration to occur without profane language, and has been described as a language largely devoid of swearing,, For example, a Japanese speaker could cause offence by using a pronoun implying that their own status is higher than the listener, Anecdotal accounts indicate that Japanese speakers rarely, if ever, swear as a response to pain. Rather, onomatopoeic expressions are used in response to and as an expression of pain. For example, ‘ Zuki - zuki ' indicates a moderate to severe throbbing pain. Forty-percent of native Japanese patients reporting tension headaches expressed their headache characteristics using zuki-zuki, Therefore, while the average native English speaker can be thought of as having a well-rehearsed "script" for swearing in response to pain, the average native Japanese speaker would not. Comparing the efficacy of swearing in response to pain in native English and Japanese speakers would therefore shed light on the "script" theory of hypoalgesia of swearing. The current study recruited 95 (56 British) participants, and asked them to complete a cold-pressor pain task whilst repeating either an English or Japanese language-specific swear or neutral (control) word. Based on previous research indicating that individuals with an Asian ethnic background demonstrate less tolerance and more sensitivity to pain than Caucasians,, we hypothesise that native English speakers would show increased pain tolerance and reduced pain perception compared to native Japanese speakers. Further, as Japanese speakers do not commonly use swearing in response to pain, swearing should not trigger a rehearsed "script" and so should not result in a reduced pain experience. Therefore, we would expect only English speakers to show an increased pain tolerance and reduced pain experience when they swear. A 2 (culture; Japanese, English) × 2 (word intervention; swearing, non-swearing) fully independent design was implemented. Pain tolerance was measured using cold-pressor latency and pain perception was self-assessed using a visual analogue scale. Participants were randomly assigned to the swearing and non-swearing conditions. Ninety-five students (59 females and 36 males; age range 18–44; mean age 22.42 years) based on an a priori power calculation. The power calculation indicated that a minimum The pain tolerance (time that the participant's hand remained in the iced water) and self-reported pain perception (score on the Visual Analogue Scale) were recorded and these data were then analysed using SPSS version 24. A series of 2 × 2 fully independent analyses of variances was used to explore the impact of culture and the intervention of swearing on pain tolerance and pain perception. Descriptive statistics were computed and normality of each variable was assessed by means of the The current research replicated previous studies finding that swearing during exposure to a cold-pressor pain stimulus increases pain tolerance,, In addition, the present work explored whether differences in the effectiveness of swearing as a method of pain control would be governed by social and cultural factors, namely that of a "scripting effect". The results indicate that swearing increased pain tolerance irrespective of cultural background. Swearing as a response to pain did not In conclusion, the present study indicates that, in line with Stephens' and colleagues research,, swearing can modify the length of time that people can tolerate a painful stimulus. However, the current study is the first to show that this increase in pain tolerance as a result of a swearing intervention can occur beyond English speaking cultures, specifically in this study within Japanese culture. It is interesting that there was no evidence of any differential effect of swearing This article presents evidence for an hypoalgesic effect of swearing across cultures. The observed hypoalgesic effect of swearing in native Japanese speakers indicates that the underlying mechanism is unlikely to be a scripting effect. Rather the results suggest that swearword-associated hypoalgesia is a universal phenomenon. For the current study informed consent was required. All participants gave verbal consent and were tested in accordance with the national and local ethics guidelines adhering to the Declaration of Helsinki. Study protocol was not pre-registered. The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest. This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

You might be interested:  How Do Pain Relief Spray Work

R. Stephens et al. A. Hunt et al. M. Hobara O. Komiyama et al. D.D. Price et al. R.A. Seymour et al. C.L. von Baeyer et al. J.A. Lipton et al. C.L. Edwards et al. A.Y. Hsieh et al.

P.J. Watson et al. G. Swee et al. S. Bruehl et al. F.J. Keefe et al. R. Stephens et al. R. Stephens et al. R.C. Schank M. Roy et al. S. Pinker

Swearing produces effects that are not observed with other forms of language use. Thus, swearing is powerful. It generates a range of distinctive outcomes: physiological, cognitive, emotional, pain-relieving, interactional and rhetorical. However, we know that the power of swearing is not intrinsic to the words themselves. Hence, our starting question is: How does swearing get its power? In this Overview Paper, our aim is threefold. (1) We present an interdisciplinary analysis of the power of swearing (‘what we know’), drawing on insights from cognitive studies, pragmatics, communication, neuropsychology, and biophysiology. We identify specific effects of swearing, including, inter alia: emotional force and arousal; increased attention and memory; heightened autonomic activity, such as heart rate and skin conductance; hypoalgesia (pain relief); increased strength and stamina; and a range of distinctive interpersonal, relational and rhetorical outcomes. (2) We explore existing (possible) explanations for the power of swearing, including, in particular, the hypothesis that aversive classical conditioning takes place via childhood punishments for swearing. (3) We identify and explore a series of questions and issues that remain unanswered by current research/theorising (‘what we don’t know’), including the lack of direct empirical evidence for aversive classical conditioning; and we offer directions for future research. In certain circumstances, words can be uttered as an involuntary action. We hypothesize that, once pronunciation of a word is fully prepared it can be triggered as a reflex with no need for cortical processing. We used modified protocols of picture naming tasks, with different levels of cognitive demands, to measure reaction time to word pronunciation (RTWP). In test trials, picture presentation was accompanied by a startling auditory stimulus (SAS). When one and the same picture was repeatedly shown, SAS shortened RTWP by about 30% (StartReact effect), which did not occur when random pictures were shown. If subjects were led to learn which picture was to appear after repeated presentation of three pictures in sequence, they exhibited again the StartReact effect. We conclude that word pronunciation may be fully prepared for execution in absence of cognitive demands. However, the StartReact effect is inhibited during cognitive tasks.

A 57-year-old woman sustained gradually progressive sensorimotor disturbance in the left upper extremity for one year. Neurological examination found a diminished sensation below the left C7 dermatome and reduced strength in the left interosseous muscles. Computed tomography of the cervical spine revealed a high density mass at C7, in the left dorsal part of the spinal canal. Magnetic resonance imaging found an enhancing, en-plaque tumor at C6-T1, involving a non-enhancing part, and considerable compression of the spinal cord. The patient underwent tumor resection through hemilaminectomy of C5-C7. The tumor was located epidurally, highly fibrous including bony-hard parts, and severely adhered to the dura mater that necessitated drilling for debulking. A subtotal resection was achieved and histological diagnosis was a fibrous meningioma with metaplastic ossification. Ossification may be a pathognomonic appearance of spinal extradural meningiomas that makes resection maneuvers difficult. The use of intrathecal morphine therapy has been increasing. Intrathecal morphine therapy is deemed the last resort for patients with intractable chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) who failed other treatments including surgery and pharmaceutical interventions. However, effective treatments for patients with CNCP who “failed” this last resort because of severe side effects and lack of optimal pain control remain unclear. Here we report two successfully managed patients (Ms. S and Mr. T) who had intractable pain and significant complications years after the start of intrathecal morphine therapy. The two patients had intrathecal morphine pump implantation due to chronic consistent pain and multiple failed surgical operations in the spine. Years after morphine pump implantation, both patients had significant chronic pain and compromised function for activities of daily living. Additionally, Ms. S also had four episodes of small bowel obstruction while Mr. T was diagnosed with end stage severe “dementia”. The successful management of these two patients included the simultaneous multidisciplinary approach for pain management, opioids tapering and discontinuation. The case study indicates that for patients who fail to respond to intrathecal morphine pump therapy due to side effects and lack of optimal pain control, the simultaneous multidisciplinary pain management approach and opioids tapering seem appropriate. Our foulest outbursts may reveal just how important words are to thought and feeling. They might even hint at our ancestors’ first utterances, finds Tiffany O’Callaghan To improve care and management of patients with chronic pain it is important to understand patients’ experiences of treatment, and of the people and the environment involved. As chronic pain patients often have long relationships with medical clinics and pain management centres, the team and team interactions with the patients could impact the treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to elicit as honest as possible an account of chronic pain patients’ experiences associated with their care and feed this information back to the clinical team as motivation for improvement. The research was conducted at a large hospital-based pain management centre. One hundred consecutive patients aged 18 years and above, who had visited the centre at least once before, were invited to participate. Seventy patients agreed and were asked to write a letter, as if to a friend, describing the centre. On completion of the study, all letters were transcribed into NVivo software and a thematic analysis performed. Six key themes were identified: (i) staff attitude and behaviour; (ii) interactions with the physician; (iii) importance of a dedicated pain management centre; (iv) personalized care; (v) benefits beyond pain control; (vi) recommending the pain management centre. The findings suggest that the main reasons that patients recommended the centre were: (i) support and validation provided by the staff; (ii) provision of detailed information about the treatment choices available; (iii) personalized management plan and strategies to improve overall quality of life alongside pain control. None of the letters criticized the care provided, but eight of seventy reported long waiting times for the first appointment as a problem. Patient views are central to improving care. However, satisfaction questionnaires or checklists can be intimidating, and restrictive in their content, not allowing patients to offer spontaneous feedback. We used a novel approach of writing a letter to a friend, which encouraged reporting of uncensored views. The results of the study have encouraged the clinical team to pursue their patient management strategies and work to reduce the waiting time for a first appointment.

You might be interested:  Api General Cure

: Swearing as a response to pain: A cross-cultural comparison of British and Japanese participants

What God said about pain?

My favorite Bible verses about finding Purpose in Pain — Nothing Is Wasted I’m not normally one to cherry-pick verses from the Bible. I believe there is usually much more richness to be experienced in understanding entire passages and their context. I guess this is why I love preaching and teaching.

I want people to experience those “aha” moments where a verse or a passage becomes more real and relevant to them than ever before. However, there are definitely some verses that I keep logged in my memory bank—or hidden in my heart, if you will. These verses help me in times of distress and emotional unrest.

These verses keep me focused on God’s promises rather than my problems. I would encourage you to also memorize these. Keep them close to you. Put them on your phone background screen. Write them on sticky notes and hang them on your mirror so you can see them first thing in the morning.

  1. I pray they encourage your heart and lift your head today! Isaiah 30:20-21 And though the Lord give you the bread of adversity and the water of affliction, yet your Teacher will not hide himself anymore, but your eyes shall see your Teacher.
  2. And your ears shall hear a word behind you, saying, “This is the way, walk in it,” when you turn to the right or when you turn to the left.1 Peter 5:10 And after you have suffered a little while, the God of all grace, who has called you to his eternal glory in Christ, will himself restore, confirm, strengthen, and establish you.

Psalm 34:18 The Lord is near to the brokenhearted and saves the crushed in spirit. Philippians 4:5b-7 The Lord is near. Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Romans 8:18 I consider that our present sufferings are not worth comparing with the glory that will be revealed in us.2 Cor 4:16-18 Therefore we do not lose heart. Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day. For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all.

So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. Isaiah 43:2 When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and when you pass through the rivers, they will not sweep over you.

When you walk through the fire, you will not be burned; the flames will not set you ablaze. James 1:2-4 Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything.

John 16:33 “I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” Psalm 23:4 Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.

  • Romans 8:28 And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.1 Peter 1:6-7 In all this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials.
  • These have come so that the proven genuineness of your faith—of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire—may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed.

James 1:12 Blessed is the one who perseveres under trial because, having stood the test, that person will receive the crown of life that the Lord has promised to those who love him. Romans 5:3-5 Not only so, but we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope.

  • And hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit, who has been given to us.
  • Romans 8:26 In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness.
  • We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us through wordless groans.

Psalm 30:5b Weeping may stay for the night, but rejoicing comes in the morning. Ecclesiastes 3:1-4 There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens: a time to be born and a time to die, a time to plant and a time to uproot, a time to kill and a time to heal, a time to tear down and a time to build, a time to weep and a time to laugh, a time to mourn and a time to dance, Galatians 6:9 Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up.2 Corinthians 1:3-4 Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of compassion and the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves receive from God.2 Chronicles 16:9a For the eyes of the Lord range throughout the earth to strengthen those whose hearts are fully committed to him.

Romans 8:1 Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus, Phil 1:6 being confident of this, that He who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus. Hosea 2:14-15 “Therefore I am now going to allure her; I will lead her into the wilderness and speak tenderly to her.

There I will give her back her vineyards, and will make the Valley of Achor a door of hope. There she will respond as in the days of her youth, as in the day she came up out of Egypt. Matthew 7:24-25 “Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock.

You might be interested:  Pain In The Groin Area Female

What is Jiraiya’s famous quote?

“: ” The Tale of Jiraiya the Gallant (TV Episode 2009) – IMDb

: Never going back on your word no matter what and never giving up despite what the odds may tell you to do. Naruto- if that is truly your ninja way, than as you teacher I have no buisiness at all whining. Because as everyone knows, a student inherits his ninja way from his teacher. Right Natuto? Isn’t that so? Never give up! No matter what. That was the true choice that I was supposed to make. Naruto, you are the prophecy. I’m sure of it now. I leave the rest to you. : The Tale of Jiraiya the Gallant. Now it’ll end a bit better, I hope. The final chapter. I’ll call it: Frog at the bottom of the well drifts of into the great ocean. Just barely glorious. But glorious indeed. Now I suppose it’s abaut time I put down my pen. Oh, right. What should I name the sequel? I wonder. Let’s see: The Tale of Naruto Uzumaki. Yes. That has a nice ring to it. : In the shinobi world it’s not how you live, it’s how you die. A shinobi’s life is not measured by how they live but rather it’s measured by what they accomplish before their death. And looking back, my life has really been full of nothing but failure. Continually rejected by Tsunade, : not being able to stop my friend and unable to protect either my student or my mentor. Compared to the great deeds of the hokage my actions are all insignificant things and deed. I wish I could have died like each of the hokage. A tale is only good as it’s final turn of events. A plot twist. And mistakes are important part of a plot, too. I lived my life always believing that the lessons I learned are what hound me. I swore I’d accomplish a deed so great that it would obliterate all my failures. I’d die as a splendid shinobi, at least that’s least that’s how it’s supposed to go. But my tale ending like this. The Great lord Elder prophesied that I would be the one to guide the revolution. A person who would make a great choice that will bring either peace or destruction to the world of the shinobi. I thought I would defeat Pain, stop the Akatsuki and save the world from destruction. But in the end, I failed that, too. How pitiful. How sad that this will be the end twist to the tale of Jiraiya the Gallant. What a worthless story it turned out to be. : Never going back on your word no matter what and never giving up despite what the odds may tell you to do. Naruto- if that is truly your ninja way, than as you teacher I have no business at all whining. Because as everyone knows, a student inherits his ninja way from his teacher. Right, Natuto? Isn’t that so? Never give up! No matter what. That was the true choice that I was supposed to make. Naruto, you are the prophecy. I’m sure of it now. I leave the rest to you. : Naruto. Now that I think about it, you’re just like that novel’s main character. You’ve inherited Minato and Kushina’s wishes. Their hopes. And yet. And yet I. : You are my sensei Jiraiya. You are a great ninja who possesses true talent. There’s no one else like you in a whole world! : A real ninja is one who endorse no matter what gets thrown at him. Let me explain something to you: There’s only one thing that matters if you are a shinobi. And it isn’t the number of jutsu you possess. What do you need is the guts. to never give up! : The Tale of Jiraiya the Gallant. Now it’ll end a bit better, I hope. The final chapter. I’ll call it: Frog at the bottom of the well drifts of into the great ocean. Just barely glorious. But glorious indeed. Now I suppose it’s about time I put down my pen. Oh, right. What should I name the sequel? I wonder. Let’s see: The Tale of Naruto Uzumaki. Yes. That has a nice ring to it. : In the shinobi world it’s not how you live, it’s how you die. A shinobi’s life is not measured by how they live but rather it’s measured by what they acomplish before their death. And looking back, my life has really been full of nothing but faliure. Continiually rejected by Tsunade, : not being able to stop my friend and unable to protect either my student or my mentor. Compared to the great deeds of the hokage my actions are all insignificant things and deed. I wish I could have diel like eact of the hokage. A tale is only good as it’s final turn of events. A plot twist. And mistakes are important part of a plot, too. I lived my life always believing that the lessons I learned are what haund me. I swore I’d acomplish a deed so great that it would oblitorate all my faliures. I’d die as a splendid shinobi, at least that’s least that’s how it’s supposed to go. But my tale ending like this. The Great lord Elder prophesied that I would be the one to guide the revolution. A person who would make a great choice that will bring either peace or destruction to the world of the shinobi. I thought I would defeat Pain, stop the Akatsuki and save the world from destruction. But in the end, I failed that, too. How pitiful. How sad that this will be the end twist to the tale of Jiraiya the Gallant. What a worthless story it tourned out to be. : Now that I think about it, you’re just like that novel’s main character. You’ve inherited Minato and Kushina’s wishes. Their hopes. And yet. And yet I. : You are my sensei Jiraiya. You are a great ninja who possesses true talent. There’s no one else like you in a whole world! : A real ninja is one who endorse no matter what gets thrown at him. Let me explain something to you: There’s only one thing that matters if you are a shinobi. And it isn’t the number of jutsu you possess. What do you need is the guts. to never give up!

: “: ” The Tale of Jiraiya the Gallant (TV Episode 2009) – IMDb

What is Jiraiya’s motto?

11. He Graduated The Academy At Six Years Old – While a student can enter the academy at any age, most start around the age of eight and graduate four years later. The only exceptions to this general rule were Kakashi (who graduated at five years old), Orochimaru (six), Jiraiya (six), and Itachi (seven).

  1. As the possible psychological issues of graduating at such an early age manifested in these prodigies, other talented children waited until they were eight before entering the academy.
  2. Recent geniuses and prodigies like Neji and Sasuke graduated with their peers instead, allowing themselves time to mature for psychological benefits.

Graduating early makes sense for Jiraiya, however, since his motto for life was “free and uninhibited” (自由奔放, Jiyū Honpō). Jiraiya was a wanderer, even at the age of six.

Is Pain a god in Naruto?

There are many things in Naruto considered god-tier, but the villain Pain takes it to a whole new level with the inspiration behind his character. From extremely powerful chakra modes and overpowered villains to jutsu literally named after divine beings, there are many things in Naruto that one can consider to be ” god-tier,” Two villains, Madara and Pain, even go as far to declare themselves as gods, but Pain is the only one who really has a stake on the claim, and his many forms prove it.

Pain’s power, aptly named the Six Paths of Pain, is based on the Buddhist Paths of Reincarnation. Therefore, Pain really does bring a whole new meaning to “god-tier.” In Naruto, Pain is an alias that denotes six corpses controlled by the ninja Nagato via chakra receiver rods and the Rinnegan. Nagato, alongside Yahiko and Konan, was a student of the Toad Sage Jiraiya, Naruto’s best mentor and worst enemy,

Coincidentally, every single corpse that makes up Pain is a ninja whom Jiraiya encountered in his travels, and ergo Jiraiya is able to learn the secret of what Pain really is. This information later becomes crucial to Naruto, who brings down Pain and Nagato later in the series.

  1. Using corpses to represent the Buddhist Paths of Reincarnation is a clever trick on the part of Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto.
  2. The Paths refer to one of six realms a being is reborn into after death, perpetuating an endless cycle of birth, death, and rebirth until one attains enlightenment and moves on to a higher state of existence.

Here’s each one of the Six Paths of Pain: who they are in Naruto, and what their Path represents.