What Is Clotrimazole And Betamethasone Dipropionate Cream Used To Treat

0 Comments

What Is Clotrimazole And Betamethasone Dipropionate Cream Used To Treat
Descriptions – Clotrimazole and betamethasone topical combination is used to treat fungus infections. Clotrimazole works by killing the fungus or preventing its growth. Betamethasone, a corticosteroid (cortisone-like medicine or steroid), is used to help relieve redness, swelling, itching, and other discomfort of fungus infections.

  • Ringworm of the foot (tinea pedis or athlete’s foot),
  • Ringworm of the groin (tinea cruris or jock itch), and
  • Ringworm of the body (tinea corporis).

This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms:

  • Cream
  • Lotion

Can you use betamethasone on your private parts?

Proper Use – Drug information provided by: Merative, Micromedex ® It is very important that you use this medicine only as directed by your doctor. Do not use more of it, do not use it more often, and do not use it for a longer time than your doctor ordered.

  1. To do so may cause unwanted side effects or skin irritation.
  2. This medicine is for use on the skin only.
  3. Do not get it in your eyes, mouth, or vagina.
  4. Do not use it on skin areas that have cuts, scrapes, or burns.
  5. If it does get on these areas, rinse it off right away with water.
  6. This medicine should come with a patient information leaflet.

Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions. This medicine should only be used for skin conditions that your doctor is treating. Check with your doctor before using it for other conditions, especially if you think that a skin infection may be present.

This medicine should not be used to treat certain kinds of skin infections or conditions, such as severe burns. To help clear up your skin problem completely, it is very important that you keep using this medicine for the full time of treatment, even if your symptoms begin to clear up after a few days.

Do not miss any doses. Do not use the topical cream, gel, lotion, ointment, and spray on the face, scalp, groin, or underarms unless directed to do so by your doctor. Do not use on skin areas that may rub or touch together. To use:

Wash your hands with soap and water before and after using this medicine. Apply a thin layer of this medicine to the affected area of the skin. Rub it in gently. With the lotion, protect the skin from water, clothing, or anything that causes rubbing until the medicine has dried. With the spray, shake well before each use. Do not bandage or otherwise wrap the skin being treated unless directed to do so by your doctor. If your doctor ordered an occlusive dressing or airtight covering to be applied over the medicine, make sure you know how to apply it. Occlusive dressings increase the amount of medicine absorbed through your skin, so use them only as directed. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

How long does it take for clotrimazole and betamethasone to work?

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? – This combination product contains two medications: betamethasone and clotrimazole. It is used to treat itchy, inflamed skin rashes caused by certain types of fungus (e.g., athlete’s foot, jock itch, ringworm).

  • Betamethasone belongs to the group of medications called corticosteroids and it works by decreasing inflammation.
  • Clotrimazole belongs to the group of medications called antifungals and it works by killing certain types of fungus.
  • Once treatment is started, itching and redness are usually relieved within 3 to 5 days.

If relief does not occur after 1 week of use for jock itch or ringworm, contact your doctor. If relief does not occur after 2 weeks of use for athlete’s foot, contact your doctor. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms.

  1. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here.
  2. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.
  3. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles.

If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do.

What is clotrimazole and betamethasone good for?

What is this medication? – CLOTRIMAZOLE; BETAMETHASONE (kloe TRIM a zole; bay ta METH a sone) is a corticosteroid and antifungal cream. It treats ringworm and infections like jock itch and athlete’s foot. It also helps reduce swelling, redness, and itching caused by these infections.

What skin conditions does betamethasone treat?

Betamethasone and breastfeeding – Betamethasone skin treatments are generally OK to use when breastfeeding. If you’re using betamethasone cream or ointment on your breasts, wash off any medicine from your breast, then wash your hands before feeding your baby. It’s usually better to use cream rather than ointment when breastfeeding, as it’s easier to wash off.

Where should you not apply betamethasone?

pronounced as (bay ta meth’ a sone) Betamethasone topical is used to treat the itching, redness, dryness, crusting, scaling, inflammation, and discomfort of various skin conditions, including psoriasis (a skin disease in which red, scaly patches form on some areas of the body) and eczema (a skin disease that causes the skin to be dry and itchy and to sometimes develop red, scaly rashes).

Betamethasone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works by activating natural substances in the skin to reduce swelling, redness, and itching. Betamethasone comes in ointment, cream, lotion, gel, and aerosol (spray) in various strengths for use on the skin and as a foam to apply to the scalp.

It is usually applied once or twice daily. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use betamethasone exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Do not apply it to other areas of your body or use it to treat other skin conditions unless directed to do so by your doctor. Your skin condition should improve during the first 2 weeks of your treatment. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve during this time. To use betamethasone topical, apply a small amount of ointment, cream, solution, gel, or lotion to cover the affected area of skin with a thin even film and rub it in gently.

To use the foam on your scalp, part your hair, apply a small amount of the medicine on the affected area, and rub it in gently. You may wash your hair as usual but not right after applying the medicine. Betamethasone foam may catch fire. Stay away from open fire, flames, and do not smoke while you are applying betamethasone foam, and for a short time afterward.

This medication is only for use on the skin. Do not let betamethasone topical get into your eyes or mouth and do not swallow it. Avoid use in the genital and rectal areas and in skin creases and armpits unless directed by your doctor. If you are using betamethasone on a child’s diaper area, do not use tight-fitting diapers or plastic pants.

Such use may increase side effects. Do not apply other skin preparations or products on the treated area without talking with your doctor. Do not wrap or bandage the treated area unless your doctor tells you that you should. Such use may increase side effects.

You might be interested:  Tmc P Care And Cure Polyclinic

Where do you apply clotrimazole betamethasone cream?

PATIENT INFORMATION – Clotrimazole (kloe trim’ a zole) and Betamethasone Dipropionate (bay” ta meth’ a sone dye proe’ pee oh nate) Cream, 1%/0.05% (base) Important information: Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream is for use on skin only.

  • Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream is a prescription medication used on the skin (topical) to treat fungal infections of the feet, groin, and body in people 17 years of age and older. Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream is used for fungal infections that are inflamed and have symptoms of redness or itching.
  • Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream should not be used in children under 17 years of age.

Before using clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream will harm your unborn baby. If you use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream during pregnancy, use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream on the smallest area of the skin and for the shortest time needed.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate passes into your breast milk. Breastfeeding women should use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream on the smallest area of skin and for the shortest time needed while breastfeeding. Do not apply clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream directly to the nipple and areola to avoid contact with your baby.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take other corticosteroid medicines by mouth or use other products on your skin or scalp that contain corticosteroids.

  • Use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to use it.
  • Use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream for the prescribed treatment time, even if your symptoms get better.
  • Do not use more than 45 grams of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream in 1 week.
  • Do not bandage, cover, or wrap the treated area unless your healthcare provider tells you to. Wear loose-fitting clothing if you use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream in the groin area.
  • Do not use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream on your face or underarms (armpits).
  • For treatment of fungal infections of the groin and body:
    • Apply a thin layer of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream to the affected skin area 2 times a day for 1 week.
    • Tell your healthcare provider if the treated skin area does not improve after 1 week of treatment.
    • Do not use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream for longer than 2 weeks.
  • For treatment of fungal infections of the feet:
    • Apply a thin layer of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream to the affected skin area 2 times a day for 2 weeks.
    • Tell your healthcare provider if the treated skin area does not improve after 2 weeks of treatment. Do not use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream longer than 4 weeks.
    • Wash your hands after applying clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream.

What are the possible side effects of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream? Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream may cause serious side effects, including:

  • Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream can pass through your skin. Too much clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream passing through your skin can cause your adrenal glands to stop working. Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check for adrenal gland problems.
  • Vision problems. Topical corticosteroids may increase your chance of developing cataracts and glaucoma. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop blurred vision or other vision problems during treatment with clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream.

The most common side effects of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream include burning, tingling, rash, swelling, and infections. These are not all the possible side effects of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

  • Store clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream at room temperature between 68 to 77°F (20 to 25°C).
  • Keep clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information about the safe and effective use of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream. Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information leaflet. You can ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for information about clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream that is written for health professionals.

  • What are the ingredients in clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream?
  • Active ingredients: clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate
  • Inactive ingredients: Ceteareth-30, cetyl alcohol, mineral oil, propylene glycol, purified water, sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate, stearyl alcohol and white petrolatum; benzyl alcohol as preservative.

This Patient Information has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  1. Manufactured For:
  2. Teva Pharmaceuticals Parsippany, NJ 07054
  3. Rev. B 2/2023

How do I know if clotrimazole is working?

How does clotrimazole work? Clotrimazole works by killing the fungus (yeast) that is causing the infection. Clotrimazole kills fungus by causing holes to appear in its cell membrane and the contents leak out. This kills the fungus and treats the infection.

  • How long does it take to work? The symptoms of fungal infections, such as itching or soreness, should get better within a few days of treatment.
  • Red and scaly skin may take longer to get better.
  • You may need treatment for between 1 and 4 weeks.
  • Eep using clotrimazole for 2 weeks even if your symptoms have gone.

This will stop the infection coming back. Talk to a doctor if your symptoms do not get better within 7 days. You may need a longer course of treatment or a stronger medicine. Are there any long-term side effects? Do not use clotrimazole cream, spray or solution for more than 4 weeks, unless a doctor tells you to.

econazole (cream)miconazole (cream, spray powder, powder) ketoconazole (cream) terbinafine (cream, gel, spray, solution)griseofulvin (spray)

You can buy any of these from a pharmacy. Ask the pharmacist what medicine is best for you. Will it affect my contraception? Clotrimazole cream, spray and solution will not affect any type of contraception, including the combined pill or emergency contraception,

Do not scratch the area with the infection as this will damage the surface of the skin and the infection could spread.Keep the affected areas of skin clean.Keep the affected areas of skin dry where possible, but do not rub too much with a towel.Do not share towels with other people as you could spread the infection to them.Always wash your hands after treating the infection to stop it from spreading.

Page last reviewed: 24 October 2022 Next review due: 24 October 2025

What are the side effects of clotrimazole and betamethasone?

What other drugs will affect betamethasone and clotrimazole topical? – Medicine used on the skin is not likely to be affected by other drugs you use. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products,

How many days to use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream?

Adults and children 17 years of age and older—Apply to the affected skin area(s) 2 times a day, in the morning and evening, for 2 weeks.

Is clotrimazole betamethasone an antibiotic?

Drug Summary Lotrisone (clotrimazole and betamethasone) is a combination of an antifungal antibiotic and a topical steroid cream or lotion used to treat or prevent fungal infections of the skin such as athlete’s foot, jock itch, and ringworm, and to reduce itching, swelling, and redness of the skin.

Is clotrimazole an antibiotic?

Similar articles –

  • The antifungal antibiotic, clotrimazole, inhibits Cl- secretion by polarized monolayers of human colonic epithelial cells. Rufo PA, Jiang L, Moe SJ, Brugnara C, Alper SL, Lencer WI. Rufo PA, et al. J Clin Invest.1996 Nov 1;98(9):2066-75. doi: 10.1172/JCI119012. J Clin Invest.1996. PMID: 8903326 Free PMC article.
  • Levamisole inhibits intestinal Cl- secretion via basolateral K+ channel blockade. Mun EC, Mayol JM, Riegler M, O’Brien TC, Farokhzad OC, Song JC, Pothoulakis C, Hrnjez BJ, Matthews JB. Mun EC, et al. Gastroenterology.1998 Jun;114(6):1257-67. doi: 10.1016/s0016-5085(98)70432-9. Gastroenterology.1998. PMID: 9609763
  • Inhibition of cAMP-activated intestinal chloride secretion by diclofenac: cellular mechanism and potential application in cholera. Pongkorpsakol P, Pathomthongtaweechai N, Srimanote P, Soodvilai S, Chatsudthipong V, Muanprasat C. Pongkorpsakol P, et al. PLoS Negl Trop Dis.2014 Sep 4;8(9):e3119. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003119. eCollection 2014 Sep. PLoS Negl Trop Dis.2014. PMID: 25188334 Free PMC article.
  • K+ and Cl- conductances in the distal colon of the rat. Schultheiss G, Diener M. Schultheiss G, et al. Gen Pharmacol.1998 Sep;31(3):337-42. doi: 10.1016/s0306-3623(97)00458-8. Gen Pharmacol.1998. PMID: 9703198 Review.
  • Apical potassium (BK) channels and enhanced potassium secretion in human colon. Sandle GI, Hunter M. Sandle GI, et al. QJM.2010 Feb;103(2):85-9. doi: 10.1093/qjmed/hcp159. Epub 2009 Nov 5. QJM.2010. PMID: 19892809 Review.
You might be interested:  Chest Pain When Bending Down

Is betamethasone a strong steroid?

Betamethasone is a highly potent steroid that prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation. Betamethasone topical (for the skin) is used to treat the inflammation and itching caused by a number of skin conditions such as eczema or psoriasis.

Is betamethasone cream an antibiotic?

Betamethasone is an anti-inflammatory steroid drug used in cases of anaphylactic and allergic reactions, of Alzheimer and Addison diseases and in soft tissue injuries.

Is betamethasone good for skin fungus?

Descriptions – Clotrimazole and betamethasone topical combination is used to treat fungus infections. Clotrimazole works by killing the fungus or preventing its growth. Betamethasone, a corticosteroid (cortisone-like medicine or steroid), is used to help relieve redness, swelling, itching, and other discomfort of fungus infections.

  • Ringworm of the foot (tinea pedis or athlete’s foot),
  • Ringworm of the groin (tinea cruris or jock itch), and
  • Ringworm of the body (tinea corporis).

This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms:

  • Cream
  • Lotion

Why is betamethasone banned?

PREVIOUS STORIES – “In other words, it has now been scientifically proven that what Bob Baffert said from the beginning was true – Medina Spirit was never injected with betamethasone and the findings following the Kentucky Derby were solely the result of the horse being treated for a skin condition by way of a topical ointment – all at the direction of Medina Spirit’s veterinarian,” W. Photo showing the dermatitis on the hind end of Medina Spirit following the Santa Anita derby. Trainer Bob Baffert says the dermatitis was being treated with ointment called Otomax to heal the area and keep it from spreading. (Source: Bob Baffert) Robertson said Medina Spirit received betamethasone valerate in the form of an ointment; betamethasone acetate, on the other hand, is administered as an injection.

The use of the ointment is not a race violation, he said. “This should definitively resolve the matter in Kentucky and Medina Spirit should remain the official winner of the 2021 Kentucky Derby,” Robertson said. According to the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission’s regulations on drug, medication and substance withdrawal guidelines, intra-articular administration of the drug through an injection is banned.

Clotrimazole Cream | How to use for ringworm and other infections

Betamethasone through an injection is not allowed to be used on horses on race day because the anti-inflammatory, the executive director of the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium (RMTC) said. The regulations state: “KRS 230.240(2) requires the commission to promulgate administrative regulations restricting or prohibiting the administration of drugs or stimulants or other improper acts to horses prior to the horse participating in a race.

The following have a fourteen (14) day stand down period for intra-articular injection. Any IA corticosteroid injection within fourteen (14) days is a violation: (i) Betamethasone, via IA administration at 9 mg total dose in a single articular space.” Read the KHRS drug, medication, and substance withdrawal guidelines,

WAVE 3 News has reached out to Baffert and Churchill Downs for comment. This story will be updated. Copyright 2021 WAVE 3 News. All rights reserved. : Baffert’s lawyers: Medina Spirit failed Derby drug test with ointment, not injection, test shows

What happens if you use too much betamethasone cream?

Precautions – Drug information provided by: Merative, Micromedex ® It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits for any unwanted effects that may be caused by this medicine. If your symptoms do not improve within 2 to 4 weeks, or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Using too much of this medicine or using it for a long time may increase your risk of having adrenal gland problems. The risk is greater for children and patients who use large amounts for a long time. Talk to your doctor right away if you have more than one of these symptoms while you are using this medicine: blurred vision, dizziness or fainting, a fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeat, increased thirst or urination, irritability, or unusual tiredness or weakness.

Check with your doctor right away if blurred vision, difficulty with reading, or any other change in vision occurs during or after treatment. Your doctor may want your eyes be checked by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor). Check with your doctor right away if you have a skin rash, blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, flaking of the skin, itching, scaling, severe redness, stinging, swelling, or irritation on the skin.

Is clotrimazole a strong steroid?

Lotrisone (clotrimazole / betamethasone) contains a moderate-to-high potency steroid, depending on whether you’re prescribed the lotion or the cream. Only use the least amount of medication possible for the shortest amount of time to avoid side effects, such as skin thinning and irritation.

How do you apply clotrimazole cream in private parts?

pronounced as (kloe trim’ a zole) Vaginal clotrimazole is used to treat vaginal yeast infections in adults and children 12 years of age and older. Clotrimazole is in a class of antifungal medications called imidazoles. It works by stopping the growth of fungi that cause infection.

  • Vaginal clotrimazole comes as a cream to be inserted into the vagina.
  • It also may be applied to the skin around the outside of the vagina.
  • The cream is inserted into the vagina once a day at bedtime for 3 or 7 days in a row, depending on the product instructions.
  • The cream is used twice a day for up to 7 days around the outside of the vagina.

Follow the directions on the package or your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use clotrimazole exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than directed on the package or prescribed by your doctor.

Vaginal clotrimazole is available without a prescription (over the counter). If this is the first time you have had vaginal itching and discomfort, talk to a doctor before using clotrimazole. If a doctor has told you before that you had a yeast infection and you have the same symptoms again, use the vaginal cream as directed on the package.

Do not have vaginal intercourse or use other vaginal products (such as tampons, douches, or spermicides) during your treatment. You should begin to feel better during the first three days of treatment with clotrimazole. If your symptoms do not improve or get worse, call your doctor.

Can you use too much clotrimazole and betamethasone?

Precautions – Drug information provided by: Merative, Micromedex ® If your skin infection does not improve within 1 week for jock itch or ringworm of the body, and 2 weeks for athlete’s foot, or if it becomes worse, check with your doctor. Using too much of this medicine or using it for a long time may increase your risk of having adrenal gland problems.

  • The risk is greater for children and patients who use large amounts for a long time.
  • Talk to your doctor right away if you have more than one of these symptoms while you are using this medicine: blurred vision, dizziness or fainting, a fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeat, increased thirst or urination, irritability, or unusual tiredness or weakness.

Check with your doctor right away if you have a skin rash, burning, stinging, swelling, redness, or irritation on the skin. Check with your doctor right away if blurred vision, difficulty with reading, or any other change in vision occurs during or after treatment.

For patients using this medicine for athlete’s foot:

Carefully dry the feet, especially between the toes, after bathing. Avoid wearing socks made from wool or synthetic materials (eg, rayon or nylon). Instead, wear clean, cotton socks and change them daily or more often if your feet sweat freely. Wear well-ventilated shoes (eg, shoes with holes) or sandals. Use a bland, absorbent powder (eg, talcum powder) or an antifungal powder freely between the toes, on the feet, and in socks and shoes once or twice a day. Be sure to use the powder after clotrimazole and betamethasone combination cream has been applied and has disappeared into the skin. Do not use the powder as the only treatment for your fungus infection.

You might be interested:  Belt For Leg Pain

For patients using this medicine for jock itch:

Carefully dry the groin area after bathing. Avoid wearing underwear that is tight-fitting or made from synthetic materials (eg, rayon or nylon). Instead, wear loose-fitting, cotton underwear. Use a bland, absorbent powder (eg, talcum powder) or an antifungal powder freely once or twice a day. Be sure to use the powder after clotrimazole and betamethasone combination cream has been applied and has disappeared into the skin. Do not use the powder as the only treatment for your fungus infection.

For patients using this medicine for ringworm of the body:

Carefully dry yourself after bathing. Avoid too much heat and humidity if possible. Try to keep moisture from building up on affected areas of the body. Wear well-ventilated clothing. Use a bland, absorbent powder (eg, talcum powder) or an antifungal powder freely once or twice a day. Be sure to use the powder after clotrimazole and betamethasone combination cream has been applied and has disappeared into the skin. Do not use the powder as the only treatment for your fungus infection.

If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

Can you put steroid cream on your private area?

Treatment – If you experience genital irritation, it is better to seek medical help than to self-medicate, since some over-the-counter treatments contain potentially allergenic and irritant ingredients. Your doctor will usually prescribe emollients and topical steroids (steroid creams and ointments) to treat genital and perianal eczema.

Emollients can be applied to the genital area as often as required. They should be reapplied after bathing and showering. Use emollient as a soap substitute and avoid all soap and cosmetic washes. It is also a good idea to wash with emollients after opening your bowels to prevent infection when the skin is inflamed (is red or darker than your usual skin tone, depending on skin colour) and sore.

Topical steroids are safe to use in the genital area as long as they are of the correct strength and are used appropriately. Genital skin absorbs topical steroids more readily than other parts of the body, and topical steroids should therefore be used carefully in this area.

  • Topical steroids are generally used once a day, or as prescribed, and a 30g tube should normally last at least 3 months.
  • It is also important to avoid prolonged or over-use of combination steroid preparations, in particular those containing certain antibiotics such as neomycin, which may cause allergic contact dermatitis.

If combined topical steroids and antibiotic creams are prescribed for infection, they should be used for a maximum of 14 days, after which time you should return to plain topical steroids if the eczema is still flaring. Ointment-based topical treatments contain fewer potential allergens than creams, so are especially suitable for sensitive areas.

  1. Since ointments are greasy, they spread easily and are well-absorbed.
  2. However, creams are easier to spread on hair-bearing skin.
  3. When using a topical steroid, leave a gap of 20-30 minutes between applying it and an emollient.
  4. This is to avoid diluting the topical steroid or transferring it to areas where it is not needed.

It does not matter which is applied first. Try to apply the topical steroid at the opposite time of day to when you usually have sex.

What steroid cream can I use on my pubic area?

Topical steroids, such as dermovate or nerisone forte, are often prescribed for a number of skin conditions of the vulva, such as lichen sclerosus or lichen planus. They are safe and highly effective, but often women will have anxiety about using steroids and be fearful of side effects.

What cream can be applied on private parts?

Emollients such as Dermol, E45, Diprobase and Zerobase (many other brands available) can be used as soap substitutes in the bath or shower and can be left on as a moisturiser. Aqueous cream can be used as a soap substitute but is not recommended to leave on as a moisturiser as it can cause irritation.

Which ointment is best for itching in private parts?

Genital itching may involve the vagina or the genital area (vulva), which contains the external genital organs. Itching is an unpleasant sensation that seems to require scratching for relief. The most common causes of genital itching include the following:

Irritation or allergic reactions: Chemicals that come in contact with the vagina or genital area, such as those in laundry detergents, bleaches, fabric softeners, synthetic fibers, bubble baths, soaps, feminine hygiene sprays, perfumes, menstrual pads, fabric dyes, toilet tissue, vaginal creams, douches, condoms, and contraceptive foams After menopause, thinning and drying of the lining of the vagina due to decreased estrogen levels

Doctors can usually determine the cause by asking about symptoms and by examining the genital area and vagina. Women should see a doctor if itching lasts more than a few days or is severe or if other symptoms suggesting an infection (such as pain or discharge) develop.

If women have a discharge, doctors use a cotton swab to take a sample of the discharge from the vagina or cervix. Doctors examine the sample under a microscope to check for the microorganisms that cause yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis, and Trichomonas vaginitis. They usually also send a sample to the laboratory to test for gonorrhea Diagnosis Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which infect the lining of the urethra, cervix, rectum, or throat, or the membranes that cover.

read more and chlamydial infections Diagnosis Chlamydial infections include sexually transmitted infections of the urethra, cervix, and rectum that are caused by the bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis, These bacteria can also infect. read more (which are sexually transmitted). The condition causing genital itching is corrected or treated when possible. General measures can help relieve symptoms. Changing underwear and bathing or showering once a day help keep the vagina and genital area clean and less likely to become irritated.

  • More frequent bathing or showering may cause excessive dryness, which can increase itching.
  • Using a cornstarch-based unscented body powder can help keep the genital area dry.
  • Women should not use talc-based powders.
  • Washing the area with plain warm water is recommended.
  • But if soap is needed, a nonallergenic soap should be used.

Other products (such as creams, feminine hygiene sprays, or douches) should not be applied to the vaginal area. These general measures may minimize exposure to irritants that cause itching. If itching persists, a sitz bath may help. A sitz bath is taken in the sitting position with water covering only the genital and rectal area.

  1. Sitz baths can be taken in the bathtub filled with a little water or in a large basin.
  2. If a medical product (such as a prescription cream) or a brand of condom appears to cause irritation and itching, it should not be used.
  3. Women should talk to their doctor before they stop using prescription products.

Applying a mild (low-strength) corticosteroid cream such as hydrocortisone to the genital area may provide temporary relief. The cream should not be put into the vagina and should be used for only a short period of time. For severe itching, an antihistamine taken by mouth may help temporarily.

Genital itching is a problem only when it persists, is severe, recurs, or is accompanied by pain or by a discharge that looks or smells abnormal, suggesting an infection. Keeping the genital area clean and dry and not using products that can irritate it can help. Sometimes a mild corticosteroid cream relieves itching temporarily. If a vaginal infection causes itching and a discharge, women are treated with antibiotics or antifungal drugs taken by mouth or inserted into the vagina.

NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: VIEW PROFESSIONAL VERSION VIEW PROFESSIONAL VERSION Copyright © 2023 Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA and its affiliates. All rights reserved.