Which Doctor To Consult For Throat Pain

0 Comments

Which Doctor To Consult For Throat Pain
Is it beneficial to approach an ENT specialist for a simple infection? Visiting a family doctor or a general doctor is usually the first preference for any kind of illness. But, in some cases, you may be required to consult a specialized doctor for certain symptoms in your body, especially when conditions are chronic or their effects do not seem to decrease with time.

An ENT specialist or otolaryngologist is a doctor who specializes in problems and diseases of the ear, nose and throat. You may be suggested to approach an ENT specialist by your general physician, since an ENT specialist has more experience and knowledge than a general physician in areas of the ear, nose and throat.

Conditions of ear: Conditions of the ear for which you need to visit an ENT specialist are hearing impairment, ringing in the ear (tinnitus), ear infections, pain in the ear, ear disorders that affect your balance etc. ENT specialists also treat congenital problems of ears.

Conditions of nose: Conditions of the nose for which you need to visit an ENT specialist include nasal cavity and sinus problems along with other conditions that affect your smelling sensation, physical appearance or breathing. Conditions of throat: ENT specialists can diagnose and treat problems of the throat including conditions that affect eating, swallowing, digestion, speech problems etc. Conditions of head and neck:

Conditions such as trauma, tumors, diseases or any deformities in the head, neck or face are also treated by ENT specialists. They can also treat problems arising from the nerves of the head and neck region that control vision, smell, hearing and facial movements. When do you need to visit an ENT specialist Infection or disorders for which you need to visit an ENT include:

Injury in the ear, nose or throat Problems related to nerves of your ear, nose and throat Pain in ear, nose or throat Dizziness Balance problems Ear infection Hearing impairment Swimmer’s ear Adenoid infection or tonsil Tinnitus Congenital problems of the ear, nose or throat Problems in breathing Down’s syndrome Allergy Asthma Sinus problem Deviated septum Development or growth of tumor in the ear, nose or throat Cleft palate Unpleasant appearance of the ear, nose or face Bleeding of nose Snoring Hair loss Drooping eye-lids Problems in smelling Nasal congestion Infection of the throat Sore throat Hoarseness Swallowing problems Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

If you are suffering from any of these conditions such as a throat or ear infection, no matter how mild it is, you must visit an ENT specialist and undergo necessary procedures as even mild infections can indicate serious issues that can affect your health later in life.

What specialist do you see for sore throat?

Throat conditions – Otolaryngologists also treat throat conditions, including:

Sore throat, which may result from infections, allergies or exposure to certain irritants. Tonsillitis, or infection of your tonsils, Laryngitis, or swelling of your voice box. Swallowing issues, Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) may result from a condition in your mouth, throat or esophagus. Vocal cord conditions, including vocal nodules, vocal cord dysfunction or vocal cord paralysis,

When should I see an ENT for throat pain?

When Should You See an ENT for Throat Issues? The human ear, nose and throat system is incredibly complex and highly interlinked, leading to the need for medical specialists who focus on this area alone. These specialists, known colloquially as ear, nose and throat doctors (ENT) offer expert guidance on the management of a wide range of health conditions.

  • However, many people are unsure when a consultation with an ENT may be a suitable choice.
  • One of the reasons for this confusion is due to the three bodily areas that ENTs specialize in.
  • After all, most specialists have a primary organ or bodily area that they focus on: cardiologists and the heart, dermatologists and the skin, pulmonologists and the lungs, and so on.

ENTs, however, have three areas of specialization. As a result, many people are unsure whether an ENT is the right choice if they are just experiencing an issue with one of the three areas – for example, if you have issues with throat health, but no symptoms related to the ears or nose.

Infection: Throat infections are characterized by pain, inflammation and visible white spots on the tissue of the throat and tonsils. If you notice any of these symptoms, visit an ENT as soon as possible. Injury : If you have injured your throat or suspect you may have done so, an ENT is the right choice to help ascertain the level of damage and provide the remedies you require. A persistent sore throat: Sore throats are part and parcel of life and most resolve without any medical intervention whatsoever. However, if you have a sore throat that lingers for more than three weeks, then visiting an ENT is the best choice. Problems swallowing: If you are struggling to swallow, or find that swallowing is uncomfortable, then an ENT is the right specialist to contact. Voice loss : If you have lost your voice, also known as, then a visit to an ENT can help to establish the cause and help you to find a solution.

You may have noticed that the points above are solely related to the throat. This is because you do not need to be experiencing problems with your ears or nose to visit an ENT. This may sound strange, but to understand what ENTs do, it’s helpful to think of eating ice cream.

  • Most people who have eaten ice cream will have, at some point, experienced the sensation that swallowing the cold ice cream makes their ear itch.
  • This is entirely normal and transitory, but it’s also a great example of just how interconnected the ENT system is.
  • The cold of the ice cream is “felt” in your ears due to how the nerves of the ear, nose and throat connect with one another – even though the ice cream goes nowhere near your ears, you can still feel it in (what seems to be) a completely separate part of the body.

This is why ENTs specialize in three bodily areas; because, medically speaking, they’re not really that separate from one another. The ear, nose and throat have nerves and structural connections which mean that to specialize in one area is effectively to specialize in all three; they cannot be treated distinctly, so there’s no requirement for an individual “throat specialist.” ENTs can treat each area separately, and as a combination.

You might be interested:  Prevention Is Better Than Cure Expansion Of Idea

What does an ENT check for in your throat?

Why Is Laryngoscopy Done? – Doctors do a laryngoscopy (lair-en-GOS-kuh-pee) to:

look into what is causing a long-lasting cough, throat pain, ear pain, hoarseness or other voice problems, swallowing problems, or constant bad breath check for inflammation (swelling and irritation) look for a possible narrowing or blockage of the throat remove foreign objects, such as small toys swallowed by mistake get a sample of a mass or tissue in the throat or on the vocal cords

What does an ENT stand for?

ENTs Treat the Fundamental Functions of Life – Imagine a singer not being able to sing, or you not being able to hear her beautiful music. Imagine not being able to smell the earth after a spring rain, or not being able to taste and enjoy your favorite holiday meal.

Imagine not being able to sleep through the night next to your loved one because they snore. These are some of the fundamental functions of life that make living so rich and wonderful. Yet when one or more of these functions no longer work the way they should, living is diminished or even jeopardized.

Hearing and balance, swallowing and speech, breathing and sleep issues, allergies and sinuses, head and neck cancer, skin disorders, even facial plastic surgery are just some of the conditions that “ENT” (ear, nose, and throat) specialists treat. Professionally, ENT specialists are called “otolaryngologists” (pronounced: oh/toe/lair/in/goll/oh/jists), but it’s easier just to say “ENT.”

Can ENT diagnose throat infection?

Disorders that affect our ability to speak and swallow properly can have a tremendous impact on our lives and livelihoods. ENT specialists treat sore throat, infections, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), throat tumors, airway and vocal cord disorders, and more. Dr. VyVy Young – Board Certified Otolaryngologist css id:

Can ENT treat throat infection?

Is it beneficial to approach an ENT specialist for a simple infection? Visiting a family doctor or a general doctor is usually the first preference for any kind of illness. But, in some cases, you may be required to consult a specialized doctor for certain symptoms in your body, especially when conditions are chronic or their effects do not seem to decrease with time.

  • An ENT specialist or otolaryngologist is a doctor who specializes in problems and diseases of the ear, nose and throat.
  • You may be suggested to approach an ENT specialist by your general physician, since an ENT specialist has more experience and knowledge than a general physician in areas of the ear, nose and throat.

Conditions of ear: Conditions of the ear for which you need to visit an ENT specialist are hearing impairment, ringing in the ear (tinnitus), ear infections, pain in the ear, ear disorders that affect your balance etc. ENT specialists also treat congenital problems of ears.

Conditions of nose: Conditions of the nose for which you need to visit an ENT specialist include nasal cavity and sinus problems along with other conditions that affect your smelling sensation, physical appearance or breathing. Conditions of throat: ENT specialists can diagnose and treat problems of the throat including conditions that affect eating, swallowing, digestion, speech problems etc. Conditions of head and neck:

Conditions such as trauma, tumors, diseases or any deformities in the head, neck or face are also treated by ENT specialists. They can also treat problems arising from the nerves of the head and neck region that control vision, smell, hearing and facial movements. When do you need to visit an ENT specialist Infection or disorders for which you need to visit an ENT include:

Injury in the ear, nose or throat Problems related to nerves of your ear, nose and throat Pain in ear, nose or throat Dizziness Balance problems Ear infection Hearing impairment Swimmer’s ear Adenoid infection or tonsil Tinnitus Congenital problems of the ear, nose or throat Problems in breathing Down’s syndrome Allergy Asthma Sinus problem Deviated septum Development or growth of tumor in the ear, nose or throat Cleft palate Unpleasant appearance of the ear, nose or face Bleeding of nose Snoring Hair loss Drooping eye-lids Problems in smelling Nasal congestion Infection of the throat Sore throat Hoarseness Swallowing problems Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

If you are suffering from any of these conditions such as a throat or ear infection, no matter how mild it is, you must visit an ENT specialist and undergo necessary procedures as even mild infections can indicate serious issues that can affect your health later in life.

What causes a prolonged sore throat?

Other causes – Other causes of a sore throat include:

Allergies. Allergies to pet dander, molds, dust and pollen can cause a sore throat. The problem may be complicated by postnasal drip, which can irritate and inflame the throat. Dryness. Dry indoor air can make your throat feel rough and scratchy. Breathing through your mouth — often because of chronic nasal congestion — also can cause a dry, sore throat. Irritants. Outdoor air pollution and indoor pollution such as tobacco smoke or chemicals can cause a chronic sore throat. Chewing tobacco, drinking alcohol and eating spicy foods also can irritate your throat. Muscle strain. You can strain muscles in your throat by yelling, talking loudly or talking for long periods without rest. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD is a digestive system disorder in which stomach acids back up in the food pipe (esophagus). Other signs or symptoms may include heartburn, hoarseness, regurgitation of stomach contents and the sensation of a lump in your throat. HIV infection. A sore throat and other flu-like symptoms sometimes appear early after someone is infected with HIV. Also, someone who is HIV-positive might have a chronic or recurring sore throat due to a fungal infection called oral thrush or due to a viral infection called cytomegalovirus (CMV), which can be serious in people with compromised immune systems. Tumors. Cancerous tumors of the throat, tongue or voice box (larynx) can cause a sore throat. Other signs or symptoms may include hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, noisy breathing, a lump in the neck, and blood in saliva or phlegm.

Rarely, an infected area of tissue (abscess) in the throat or swelling of the small cartilage “lid” that covers the windpipe (epiglottitis) can cause a sore throat. Both can block the airway, creating a medical emergency. Although anyone can get a sore throat, some factors make you more susceptible, including:

Age. Children and teens are most likely to develop sore throats. Children ages 3 to 15 are also more likely to have strep throat, the most common bacterial infection associated with a sore throat. Exposure to tobacco smoke. Smoking and secondhand smoke can irritate the throat. The use of tobacco products also increases the risk of cancers of the mouth, throat and voice box. Allergies. Seasonal allergies or ongoing allergic reactions to dust, molds or pet dander make developing a sore throat more likely. Exposure to chemical irritants. Particles in the air from burning fossil fuels and common household chemicals can cause throat irritation. Chronic or frequent sinus infections. Drainage from your nose can irritate your throat or spread infection. Close quarters. Viral and bacterial infections spread easily anywhere people gather, whether in child care centers, classrooms, offices or airplanes. Weakened immunity. You’re more susceptible to infections in general if your resistance is low. Common causes of lowered immunity include HIV, diabetes, treatment with steroids or chemotherapy drugs, stress, fatigue, and poor diet.

You might be interested:  Right Ankle Pain Icd 10

The best way to prevent sore throats is to avoid the germs that cause them and practice good hygiene. Follow these tips and teach your child to do the same:

Wash your hands thoroughly and frequently for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the toilet, before and after eating, and after sneezing or coughing. Avoid touching your face. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Avoid sharing food, drinking glasses or utensils. Cough or sneeze into a tissue and throw it away, and then wash your hands. When necessary, sneeze into your elbow. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizers as an alternative to washing hands when soap and water aren’t available. Avoid touching public phones or drinking fountains with your mouth. Regularly clean and disinfect phones, doorknobs, light switches, remotes and computer keyboards. When you travel, clean phones, light switches and remotes in your hotel room. Avoid close contact with people who are sick or have symptoms.

How can I check my throat at home?

– The triangle icon that indicates to play Step in front of a mirror and shine a flashlight toward the back of your throat. This classic trick elevates your soft palate—the fleshy tissue on the roof of your mouth—in order to give you a better view of your throat, says Landon J. Duyka, M.D., an ear, nose, and throat doctor at Northwestern Medicine Lake Forest Hospital.

Step 2. Do a Spot Check After you open wide, scan for any unusual colors or spots. Sometimes red spots on your throat are just normal lymphatic tissue, which actually fights infection, says Dr. Duyka. But smaller, painful red spots and ulcers on your tongue and in your throat can signal a virus—especially if you’ve got a fever, he says.

(In case it’s not obvious, this a clear indicator you should see a doctor.) White spots are also a sign of infection, but if they look chalky and sit on your tonsils, they might be tonsil stones. “These are made by normal bacteria in your throat, and though they’re a nuisance, they aren’t dangerous,” Dr.

Duyka says. Related: Step 3. Feel Your Lymph Nodes Lymph nodes are soft, pea-size glands underneath your jawbone that play a major role in making sure your immune system stays up to snuff. If they swell up and feel sore, you may have an infection, says Dr. Duyka. Use your thumb, index, and middle fingers to feel for your lymph nodes in the front of your neck, just ahead of the large muscle that runs diagonally from your ear to your collarbone.

If your nodes are swollen, you likely have an infection. But swelling is usually a good sign: Lymph nodes fill themselves up with infection-fighting cells called lymphocytes, which keep your infection from spreading to the rest of your body. But if your nodes are larger than a marble or don’t go back to normal size within a month—long after your other symptoms have gone—have a doctor check them to rule out cancer.

What doctor treats mucus in throat?

When should you see a pulmonologist? – A simple cough associated with allergies or a cold shouldn’t send you looking for a pulmonary specialist. Urgent care or your primary care doctor should be your first stop, and then on to an allergist or ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist.

Chest pain or tightnessDizziness, lightheadedness or faintingDifficulty breathing, especially during exerciseFatigueWheezingRecurring or chronic bronchitis or colds that impact your respiratory systemAsthma that isn’t well-controlled, or has unidentified triggers

How many types of ENT are there?

Functional ENT Disorders – The ears, nose and throat all have essential roles to play including for our senses, speech, breathing and eating. ENT disorders can sometimes get in the way of these essential functions, causing symptoms such as:

Hearing problems including tinnitus and hearing loss Difficulty swallowing Hoarseness or losing your voice Loss of the sense of taste Loss of the sense of smell Blocked airways causing snoring or breathing problems

If you’re experiencing these kinds of problems then you may need to see ear, nose and throat consultants to find out why. The treatment we provide can often help to improve your symptoms or at least help you to manage them. For example, getting fitted with hearing aids could have a dramatic impact on your daily life if you’ve been struggling to follow conversations.

What if my sore throat is not going away?

When Is It Time to See A Doctor? – It’s time to see a doctor when certain symptoms occur. In Children According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, you should take your child to a doctor if symptoms don’t go away with the first drink in the morning. Also, you should get immediate care if your child has severe signs such as difficulty breathing or swallowing or unusual drooling, which might indicate an inability to swallow.

A sore throat that is severe or lasts longer than a week Difficulty swallowing Difficulty breathing Difficulty opening your mouth Joint pain Earache Rash Fever higher than 101 F (38.3 C) Blood in saliva or phlegm Frequently recurring sore throats A lump in your neck Hoarseness lasting more than two weeks

When is a sore throat the worst?

Wonder if your painful sore throat is from a cold, strep throat, or tonsillitis ? Here’s help with how to tell. A sore throat is often the first sign of a cold. However, a sore throat from a cold often gets better or goes away after the first day or two.

Other cold symptoms such as a runny nose and congestion may follow the sore throat. Strep throat, which is an infection due to streptococcus bacteria, is another cause of sore throats and tonsillitis. With strep throat, the sore throat is often more severe and persists. Tonsillitis is a painful inflammation or infection of the ton sils, the tissue masses located at the back of the throat.

Sore throats can be caused by viruses or bacteria, The most common causes of sore throats are viruses. Viral sore throats are often accompanied by other cold symptoms that may include a runny nose, cough, red or watery eyes, and sneezing, Other causes of sore throat include smoking, pollution or irritants in the air, allergies, and dry air.

Runny nose Sneezing Cough Mild headache Mild body aches Fever

Although there is no cure for a sore throat caused by a cold virus, there are ways to help you feel more comfortable. Drinking warm liquids, gargling with warm salt water, sucking on ice chips, or taking an over-the-counter medicine may relieve symptoms of pain or fever.

You might be interested:  Wrist Pain When Lifting

Pain relievers, such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen and naproxen, to relieve the aches and pains of a cold and sore throat. ( Aspirin should not be given to children because of its link to Reye’s syndrome, a disorder that can cause brain damage and death.) Sore throat sprays and lozenges to soothe your throat and numb the throat pain temporarily. (Lozenges should not be given to young children.) Decongestant nasal sprays to relieve a sore throat caused by postnasal drip – nasal drainage that runs down your throat. (Be sure to stop using nasal decongestant sprays after three days, or you may have an increase in congestion when you stop them.)

Antibiotics should not be used to treat a cold virus and sore throat. Antibiotics are effective only against bacteria. They will not work on sore throats associated with colds, which are caused by viruses. Stre p throat is caused by an infection of streptococcus bacteria.

Strep throat spreads by having contact with an infected person’s saliva or nasal secretions. Although strep throat is more common in children ages 5 to 15, it also occurs in adults. To diagnose strep throat, your doctor can check a rapid strep test or send a throat swab to the lab for a culture. In some cases, they may be able to diagnose strep based on your reported symptoms and other signs, such as white spots in the throat area, fever, and swollen lymph nodes in the neck.

Strep throat can cause more serious illnesses, such as rheumatic fever, a disease that may harm the heart valves. That’s why it’s important to get proper medical treatment. With proper treatment, strep throat is usually cured within 10 days. Strep throat symptoms are usually more severe than symptoms of a sore throat with a cold and may include the following:

Sudden sore throatLoss of appetitePainful swallowingRed tonsils with white spotsFever

The symptoms of a cold and strep throat can be very similar. If you think you have symptoms of strep throat, visit your healthcare provider. Your doctor will ask you about your symptoms and do a physical exam, and you may be given a strep test. A rapid strep test checks for streptococcus bacteria infection in the throat.

The test is painless and takes very little time. The tip of a cotton swab is used to wipe the back of the throat. The swab is then tested right away. If the strep test is positive, you have strep throat. If the strep test is negative, you likely do not have strep throat. However, if there are strong signs of strep throat, your healthcare provider can do a different throat swab test that is sent to the lab to see if strep bacteria can be grown (cultured) from it.

A throat culture takes a couple of days for results. Strep throat is treated using antibiotics, which kill the bacteria causing the infection. Antibiotics are often taken as pills or given as a shot. Penicillin and amoxicillin are common antibiotics used to treat strep throat.

  1. Other antibiotics are prescribed for people who are allergic to penicillin.
  2. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for antibiotic use.
  3. Take all of the medication, even if you feel better.
  4. You should feel better within a day or two.
  5. A person with strep throat should stay home until 24 hours after starting the antibiotic.

If your strep throat is not getting better, let your healthcare provider know right away. Do not stop taking your prescribed medicine unless your health care provider tells you to. Call your healthcare provider if these symptoms occur:

Fever one or two days after feeling better Nausea or vomiting Earache Headache Neck stiffness Skin rash Cough Swollen glands Painful jointsShortness of breathDark urine, rash, or chest pain (may occur three to four weeks later)

Sometimes, a sore throat is caused by tonsillitis, an inflammation of the tonsils. Tonsillitis can be caused by viruses or bacteria. While the tonsils’ job is to help fight infection, the tonsils can also become infected. When they do, the result is tonsillitis and a very painful sore throat.

Bad breath FeverVoice changes because of swellingPainful swallowing Swollen lymph glands in neck

If the tonsillitis infection is bacterial like strep throat, then antibiotics are given. If the tonsillitis infection is viral, antibiotics will not help. The virus must run its course for the sore throat to resolve. For either type of throat infection, the following treatment measures may help:

Getting plenty of restDrinking lots of fluidEating smooth, soothing foods like gelatin, ice cream, shakes, frozen desserts, and soup Avoiding crunchy or spicy foodsUsing a vaporizerTaking over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen, naproxen, or ibuprofen. Children should not take aspirin,

If the tonsillitis infections occur repeatedly, or if the tonsils are interfering with sleep and breathing, the doctor may recommend a tonsillectomy, which is the surgical removal of the tonsils. What would you like to learn about next?

Tonsillitis Treatment Strep Throat Treatment Common Cold Treatment

Can throat infection heal on its own?

How is a sore throat treated? – Usually, no specific medical treatment is needed if a virus is causing the sore throat. The throat most often gets better on its own within five to seven days. Antibiotic medicine does not cure viral pharyngitis. For acute pharyngitis caused by bacteria, your health-care provider may prescribe an antibiotic.

Will throat infection go without antibiotics?

Will Strep Throat Go Away on Its Own? – We highly recommend being seen by a provider if you are concerned you may have strep throat. Strep throat typically goes away in three to seven days with or without antibiotic treatment. However, if you don’t take antibiotics, you can remain contagious for two to three weeks and are at a higher risk for complications, such as rheumatic fever.

  • What’re more, complications resulting from the bacterial infection can lead to increased susceptibility to other viral infections like influenza which can be fatal.
  • Pro Tip: If you have been diagnosed with strep throat, you can help prevent repeat infections by changing your and your family’s toothbrushes and thoroughly disinfecting all surfaces that may have been in contact with the strep virus.

Written by, Physician Assistant : Home Remedies for Strep Throat Symptoms | GoHealth Urgent Care

How long can a throat infection last?

Sore throats are very common and usually nothing to worry about. They normally get better by themselves within a week.

What causes a chronic sore throat?

Causes of Chronic Sore Throat – Most sore throats are the result of viral infections, often related to the common cold or flu. Bacterial infections can also lead to sore throats. Some of the more common ones include strep throat, tonsillitis, whooping cough and diphtheria,

What does it mean if a sore throat lasts more than a week?

Sore Throats – Infections from viruses or bacteria are the main cause of sore throats and can make it difficult to talk and breathe. Allergies and sinus infections can also contribute to a sore throat. If you have a sore throat that lasts for more than five to seven days, you should see your doctor.